Saturday November 23, 2019

How the Internet can help those who self-injure

The study, published in the journal Digital Health, suggested that those who engage in NSSI, the Internet can provide a less threatening and more anonymous information and support network, especially if individuals are not getting support elsewhere.

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Social Media has facilitated a phenomenal rise of businesses in terms of both products and services and created many positive socio-political trend

Positive messaging through social media could be a powerful tool to help people overcome non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), a new study has found.

The study, published in the journal Digital Health, suggested that those who engage in NSSI, the Internet can provide a less threatening and more anonymous information and support network, especially if individuals are not getting support elsewhere.

“Self-injury, including cutting and burning, is a serious public health concern around the world,” said lead author Stephen Lewis, Professor at Canada’s University of Guelph.

The researchers also found that while it affects people of all ages, self-injury is more prevalent among people from 14 to 24. Within that age range, up to one in five have engaged in self-injury.

“We know that young people who struggle with self-injury often go online to obtain needed social support,” said Lewis, adding that the stigma surrounding self-injury contributes to a strong sense of isolation.

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Exposure to pessimistic comments about recovery did not increase participants’ sense of hopelessness. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers measured how online comments about self-injury affected the attitudes about recovery in people who have engaged in self-injury.

The team embedded fictional peer comments in a screenshot of an NSSI-themed YouTube video and assessed attitudes about NSSI recovery before and after positive and negative messaging.

While there is growing concern that accessing NSSI content online may hinder recovery, the researcher found that exposure to positive comments improved participants’ attitudes about recovery.

They also found that exposure to pessimistic comments about recovery did not increase participants’ sense of hopelessness.

“NSSI is a complex concern, but many who self-injure experience very painful, intense and difficult emotions that are perceived as extremely difficult to tolerate and control,” Lewis said.

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“To this end, we see that the most common reason given for self-injury is to get relief from these adverse experiences, even if for a moment,” Lewis noted. (IANS)

Next Story

India Becomes Top-Priority Gaming Creator on YouTube

To promote Indian content creators, YouTube is set to kick off its "NextUp for Gamers" initiative in Chennai

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YouTube
More than 200 million gamers come to YouTube every single day globally to watch gaming videos and streams. In 2018, they watched over 50 billion hours of gaming content on the platform. Pixabay

Unrepresented in the global online gaming community till couple of years back, India today is churning out next-generation of gaming creators on YouTube and the momentum is picking up fast not only in English and Hindi but also in vernacular languages, a top company executive said on Monday.

Games like PUBG have created a sizable livestreaming community in India which is the third largest gaming market for the Google-owned video-sharing website, which last reported over 265 million monthly active users in the country.

“India is the top-priority gaming market for us in the APAC region. We are excited to see a growing livestreaming community on YouTube from here and will extend all our support to help them gain further ground,” Ines Cha, Head of Creator Ecosystem and Gaming Partnerships, APAC, YouTube, told IANS.

“The Indian gaming creators were waiting for so long. They were so hungry to showcase their gaming skills to the world. Seeing their passion and engagement, we will double down on our efforts to help them create more useful content like in the field of education,” Cha added.

More than 200 million gamers come to YouTube every single day globally to watch gaming videos and streams. In 2018, they watched over 50 billion hours of gaming content on the platform.

In India, PUBG Mobile videos are over 15 times more frequently uploaded while “Garena Free Fire” (mobile game) videos are fine times more frequently uploaded in India compared to the rest of the world.

“Gaming content in India used to be mostly in Hindi and English. Now we’re seeing the rise of gaming content in other Indic languages such as Marathi, Tamil, Bengali, Telugu and Malayalam. Non-Hindi creators with less than 5,000 subscribers in 2018 are hitting six-figure subscriber numbers today,” informed Cha.

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The time is ripe to see the Indian gaming ecosystem explode and YouTube will make sure it is right there for the gaming enthusiasts. Pixabay

Livestreaming continues to be an area of growth for creators, with watch-time increasing by 10 times over the last three years.

Among the most-viewed genres in India are Battle Royale, Action Adventure, and Sandbox games such as PUBG Mobile, GTA5 and Minecraft.

In Chennai, the most popular game is “Garena Free Fire” while PUBG Mobile is very popular in Mumbai.

Back in 2017, there was only one channel in the gaming genre over one million subscribers — CarryMinati — which was also an entertainment first channel doing commentary on gameplay.

Over the last two years, there has been a shift from entertainment-led gaming content to core gaming, including live streaming, e-sports and tutorials in local and regional languages, says YouTube.

YouTube
India today is churning out next-generation of gaming creators on YouTube and the momentum is picking up fast not only in English and Hindi but also in vernacular languages. Pixabay

The growth of online gaming in India has exploded over the past few years.

Some of the leading creators include Dynamo Gaming with over 5.61 subscribers, Mortal with over 3.39 million subscribers and CarryisLive with 2.97 million subscribers.

To promote Indian content creators, YouTube is set to kick off its “NextUp for Gamers” initiative in Chennai on November 21.

Launched in India last year, the initiative provides creators with an opportunity to be mentored by production and channel development experts in new production techniques to further enhance their content.

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“The time is ripe to see the Indian gaming ecosystem explode and YouTube will make sure it is right there for the gaming enthusiasts. The momentum is all across the country and is not just limited to few cities,” said Cha. (IANS)