Thursday April 25, 2019

How the Internet can help those who self-injure

The study, published in the journal Digital Health, suggested that those who engage in NSSI, the Internet can provide a less threatening and more anonymous information and support network, especially if individuals are not getting support elsewhere.

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Social Media has facilitated a phenomenal rise of businesses in terms of both products and services and created many positive socio-political trend

Positive messaging through social media could be a powerful tool to help people overcome non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), a new study has found.

The study, published in the journal Digital Health, suggested that those who engage in NSSI, the Internet can provide a less threatening and more anonymous information and support network, especially if individuals are not getting support elsewhere.

“Self-injury, including cutting and burning, is a serious public health concern around the world,” said lead author Stephen Lewis, Professor at Canada’s University of Guelph.

The researchers also found that while it affects people of all ages, self-injury is more prevalent among people from 14 to 24. Within that age range, up to one in five have engaged in self-injury.

“We know that young people who struggle with self-injury often go online to obtain needed social support,” said Lewis, adding that the stigma surrounding self-injury contributes to a strong sense of isolation.

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Exposure to pessimistic comments about recovery did not increase participants’ sense of hopelessness. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers measured how online comments about self-injury affected the attitudes about recovery in people who have engaged in self-injury.

The team embedded fictional peer comments in a screenshot of an NSSI-themed YouTube video and assessed attitudes about NSSI recovery before and after positive and negative messaging.

While there is growing concern that accessing NSSI content online may hinder recovery, the researcher found that exposure to positive comments improved participants’ attitudes about recovery.

They also found that exposure to pessimistic comments about recovery did not increase participants’ sense of hopelessness.

“NSSI is a complex concern, but many who self-injure experience very painful, intense and difficult emotions that are perceived as extremely difficult to tolerate and control,” Lewis said.

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“To this end, we see that the most common reason given for self-injury is to get relief from these adverse experiences, even if for a moment,” Lewis noted. (IANS)

Next Story

YouTube Slammed For Hosting Controversial Conspiracy Theorist Alex Jones

YouTube along with its community guidelines that do not actually prohibit banned users from appearing on other channels are being roasted on the Internet

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YouTube
YouTube. Pixabay

Google-owned video sharing platform YouTube is being heavily criticised for hosting controversial conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, who is banned from several major social networking platforms for his offensive posts, on a two-hour long podcast episode accessible to its 1.8 billion global users.

Eight months after being banned from YouTube itself, Jones returned to the platform for Internet-famed Logan Paul’s podcast called “Impaulsive”, where he discussed conspiracy theories and questionable information on sensitive subjects like autism, The Verge reported on Thursday.

Now the platform is being accused of being unwise for giving a notorious theorist space in a show which is accessable by impressionable minors as well.

“Logan Paul, a YouTube meathead who recently mocked suicide victims and has 18 million teenage subscribers, is hosting far right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones on his podcast today. This is how radicalisation happens online,” free speech activitist, Nathan Bernard wrote on Twitter.

While Paul has nearly 19 million subscribers of himself, his podcast “Impaulsive” is subscribed by 1.4 million people.

Since YouTube projects to be working hard on combatting the spread of such content on its platform, Jones’ appearance on a famous show has put the video sharing platform in a problematic spot.

YouTube, Google, google services
The YouTube Music app is displayed on a mobile phone in Los Angeles. VOA

The episode already managed to gather 330,873 views and 5,599 comments on the platform, however the episode does not come with any context-providing information boxes about the show.

“YouTube may have taken action restricting this episode of Paul’s podcast. The episode isn’t running with any ads, the video also doesn’t appear on YouTube’s front page, nor does it appear on its trending section, which means YouTube may have limited its promotional reach,” the report said.

By last October, tech majors including Google-owned YouTube, Apple, Facebook, Spotify and Twitter either removed or restricted Jones’ activities on their platforms for promoting hate speech and abusive comments on transgenders, Muslims, immigrants and other sensitive subjects.

Also Read- WHO Might Declare Congo’s Ebola Outbreak an International Health Emergency

YouTube along with its community guidelines that do not actually prohibit banned users from appearing on other channels are being roasted on the Internet.

This was the second time in a month that Jones was allowed to appear on a popular YouTube personality’s channel, following a four-hour appearance on Joe Rogan’s podcast in February. (IANS)