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To Provide Internet Connectivity in Areas With Inadequate Infrastructure, Facebook Project Uses Drones

But the social networking giant still has its Internet.org initiative that has the stated aim of bringing Internet access and the benefits of connectivity to the portion of the world that doesn't have them.

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In 2017, Facebook discontinued a small helicopter drone project that could temporarily replace cellular services in emergency situations, The Verge earlier reported. VOA

As part of its efforts to increase Internet connectivity in areas with inadequate infrastructure, Facebook recently explored ways to use tiny, almost pocket-sized, drones to boost mobile data speeds, according to a report from Business Insider.

The drones were designed to carry “high-density solid state drives… that could then be used to ferry data”.

So perhaps the drones would act as a mesh network of sorts between a grounded connection and a user’s smartphone to facilitate high-bandwidth data transfers, The Verge reported on Friday.

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Facebook began the Aquila project in 2014. In 2017, the solar-powered drone successfully completed the second full-scale test flight. Pixabay

The project, codenamed “Catalina”, was discontinued a year ago, adding to the list of aerial Internet projects that the social networking giant abandoned.

In 2017, Facebook discontinued a small helicopter drone project that could temporarily replace cellular services in emergency situations, The Verge earlier reported.

The project was discontinued a few months after being shown off at the F8 developer conference in May of 2017.

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A high altitude platform station (HAPS) system, Aquila’s mission, according to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, was to connect the world and help people who do not have online access all the opportunities of the Internet. Pixabay

The idea was to send a helicopter equipped with telecommunications equipment hundreds of metres up in the air to be able to tether to fibre and power lines in places where wireless capacity was compromised due to disaster or other factors.

In June 2018, Facebook announced it decided to abandon its plan to develop high-flying solar-powered drones called Aquila that was aimed to deliver Internet to nearly four billion people in remote parts of the world.

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The drones were designed to carry “high-density solid state drives… that could then be used to ferry data”. Pixabay

A high altitude platform station (HAPS) system, Aquila’s mission, according to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, was to connect the world and help people who do not have online access all the opportunities of the Internet.

Also Read: Study Identifies, Frequent Urinal Trips in Night An Indicator To High Blood Pressure

Facebook began the Aquila project in 2014. In 2017, the solar-powered drone successfully completed the second full-scale test flight.

But the social networking giant still has its Internet.org initiative that has the stated aim of bringing Internet access and the benefits of connectivity to the portion of the world that doesn’t have them. (IANS)

 

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Facebook Commits $130 mn to Build Global Oversight Board for Ensuring Accountability

Facebook intends to continue funding the board's operations in the future, and these reports will be used to assess the need for additional, substantive and long-term funding

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Facebook
Facebook said it has established the independent Oversight Board Trust to ensure the board can safeguard its ability to make independent decisions and recommendations. Pixabay

Facebook has made an initial commitment of $130 million to build a global oversight board that will ensure good governance and accountability across its services and platforms.

The initial funding will cover operational costs such as office space, staff and travel expenses and should allow the board to operate for at least its first two full terms, approximately six years, Brent Harris, Director of Governance and Global Affairs at Facebook, said in a statement.

The board will submit a yearly budget to the trust for approval and disbursement of funds.

Annual reports from the board and trust will help to document the health and effectiveness of the board, including its stewardship of these resources.

Facebook intends to continue funding the board’s operations in the future, and these reports will be used to assess the need for additional, substantive and long-term funding.

Last November, Mark Zuckerberg wrote about his vision for what content governance should look like for Facebook.

Facebook said it has established the independent Oversight Board Trust to ensure the board can safeguard its ability to make independent decisions and recommendations.

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Facebook has made an initial commitment of $130 million to build a global oversight board that will ensure good governance and accountability across its services and platforms. Pixabay

“The board will have its own staff, independent from Facebook. To start, we expect this staff to include a director, case managers and dedicated staff members (or contracted services) who can support things such as the board’s communications, legal, human resources and research needs,” said Harris.

ALSO READ: Google Maps Captures Over 10 mn Miles of Street View Imagery

In addition, said Facebook, it will continue to work with outside experts to source and review candidates for board membership, including those who’ve been recommended through the public portal, which we opened in September.

“We are eager to see the Oversight Board take shape and start hearing cases next year,” said Facebook. (IANS)