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To Provide Internet Connectivity in Areas With Inadequate Infrastructure, Facebook Project Uses Drones

But the social networking giant still has its Internet.org initiative that has the stated aim of bringing Internet access and the benefits of connectivity to the portion of the world that doesn't have them.

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In 2017, Facebook discontinued a small helicopter drone project that could temporarily replace cellular services in emergency situations, The Verge earlier reported. VOA

As part of its efforts to increase Internet connectivity in areas with inadequate infrastructure, Facebook recently explored ways to use tiny, almost pocket-sized, drones to boost mobile data speeds, according to a report from Business Insider.

The drones were designed to carry “high-density solid state drives… that could then be used to ferry data”.

So perhaps the drones would act as a mesh network of sorts between a grounded connection and a user’s smartphone to facilitate high-bandwidth data transfers, The Verge reported on Friday.

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Facebook began the Aquila project in 2014. In 2017, the solar-powered drone successfully completed the second full-scale test flight. Pixabay

The project, codenamed “Catalina”, was discontinued a year ago, adding to the list of aerial Internet projects that the social networking giant abandoned.

In 2017, Facebook discontinued a small helicopter drone project that could temporarily replace cellular services in emergency situations, The Verge earlier reported.

The project was discontinued a few months after being shown off at the F8 developer conference in May of 2017.

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A high altitude platform station (HAPS) system, Aquila’s mission, according to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, was to connect the world and help people who do not have online access all the opportunities of the Internet. Pixabay

The idea was to send a helicopter equipped with telecommunications equipment hundreds of metres up in the air to be able to tether to fibre and power lines in places where wireless capacity was compromised due to disaster or other factors.

In June 2018, Facebook announced it decided to abandon its plan to develop high-flying solar-powered drones called Aquila that was aimed to deliver Internet to nearly four billion people in remote parts of the world.

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The drones were designed to carry “high-density solid state drives… that could then be used to ferry data”. Pixabay

A high altitude platform station (HAPS) system, Aquila’s mission, according to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, was to connect the world and help people who do not have online access all the opportunities of the Internet.

Also Read: Study Identifies, Frequent Urinal Trips in Night An Indicator To High Blood Pressure

Facebook began the Aquila project in 2014. In 2017, the solar-powered drone successfully completed the second full-scale test flight.

But the social networking giant still has its Internet.org initiative that has the stated aim of bringing Internet access and the benefits of connectivity to the portion of the world that doesn’t have them. (IANS)

 

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US Judge Orders Facebook to Disclose Malicious Apps’ Data: Report

The social networking giant found that the apps -- primarily social media management and video streaming apps -- retained access to group member information, like names and profile pictures in connection with group activity, from the Groups API (application programming interface)

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Social Media, Facebook, Authenticity, Posts
The social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple's App Store, July 30, 2019. VOA

As part of a probe ordered in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica data scandal involving 87 million users, a US judge has ordered Facebook to hand over data of thousands of apps that violated its user privacy.

Facebook admitted last year that it suspended “tens of thousands” of apps for possible privacy violations.

A Massachusetts judge rejected the social networking giant’s attempts to withhold the key details from state investigators, The Washington Post said in a report on Friday.

“We are disappointed that the Massachusetts Attorney General and the Court didn’t fully consider our arguments on well-established law. We are reviewing our options, including appeal,” a Facebook spokesperson Andy Stone was quoted as saying in the report.

Maura Healey, the Democratic Attorney General of Massachusetts, said: “We are pleased that the Court ordered Facebook to tell our office which other app developers may have engaged in conduct like Cambridge Analytica.”

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FILE – Attendees walk past a Facebook logo during Facebook Inc’s F8 developers conference in San Jose, California, United States. VOA

The state of Massachusetts launched the probe last September after Facebook admitted that it had suspended “tens of thousands” of apps on its platform as a result of its review on privacy practices launched following the scandal involving Cambridge Analytica.

The review, launched in 2018, followed revelations that the political consultancy hijacked personal data on millions of Facebook users and included attorneys, external investigators, data scientists, engineers, policy specialists and others, according to a Facebook statement.

The Cambridge Analytica scandal resulted in a record-breaking, $5 billion fine for Facebook from the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Also Read: I Fall in Love with India Every Time I Return Here: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos

In November 2019, Facebook revealed that at least 100 app developers may have accessed Facebook users’ data for months, confirming that at least 11 partners “accessed group members’ information in the last 60 days”.

The social networking giant found that the apps — primarily social media management and video streaming apps — retained access to group member information, like names and profile pictures in connection with group activity, from the Groups API (application programming interface). (IANS)