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Interviewees Judged Based on their Social Status Seconds after they Start to Speak

The researchers based their findings on five separate studies

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Interviewees, Social, Status
Our study shows that even during the briefest interactions, a person's speech patterns shape the way people perceive them, including assessing their competence and fitness for a job. Pixabay

Candidates at job interviews expect to be evaluated on their experience, conduct, and ideas, but now a new study provides evidence that interviewees are judged based on their social status seconds after they start to speak.

The study, to be published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that people can accurately assess a stranger’s socioeconomic position — defined by their income, education, and occupation status — based on brief speech patterns.

The findings shows that these snap perceptions influence hiring managers in ways that favour job applicants from higher social classes.

“Our study shows that even during the briefest interactions, a person’s speech patterns shape the way people perceive them, including assessing their competence and fitness for a job,” said study researcher Michael Kraus, Assistant Professor oat the Yale University.

Interviewees, Social, Status
The study, to be published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that people can accurately assess a stranger’s socioeconomic position — defined by their income, education, and occupation status — based on brief speech patterns. Pixabay

The researchers based their findings on five separate studies. The first four examined the extent that people accurately perceive social class based on a few seconds of speech.

They found that reciting seven random words is sufficient to allow people to discern the speaker’s social class with above-chance accuracy.

They discovered that speech adhering to subjective standards for English as well as digital standards — i.e. the voices used in tech products like the Amazon Alexa or Google Assistant — is associated with both actual and perceived higher social class.

The researchers also showed that pronunciation cues in an individual’s speech communicate their social status more accurately than the content of their speech.

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The fifth study examined how these speech cues influence hiring. Twenty prospective job candidates from varied current and childhood socioeconomic backgrounds were recruited to interview for an entry-level lab manager position at Yale.

Prior to sitting for a formal job interview, the candidates each recorded a conversation in which they were asked to briefly describe themselves.

A sample of 274 individuals with hiring experience either listened to the audio or read transcripts of the recordings.

The hiring managers who listened to the audio recordings were more likely to accurately assess socioeconomic status than those who read transcripts, according to the study.

Interviewees, Social, Status
The findings shows that these snap perceptions influence hiring managers in ways that favour job applicants from higher social classes. Pixabay

Devoid of any information about the candidates’ actual qualifications, the hiring managers judged the candidates from higher social classes as more likely to be competent for the job, and a better fit for it than the applicants from lower social classes.

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Moreover, they assigned the applicants from higher social classes more lucrative salaries and signing bonuses than the candidates with lower social status. (IANS)

Next Story

Google Purchasing Social Video App ‘Firework’ that Lets Users Share Short Videos Like TikTok

TikTok's parent, Beijing-based ByteDance, is valued around $75 billion

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Google, Social, Video
Based in Redwood City, California, Firework that entered India last month was valued at more than $100 million in a fundraising round earlier this year. Pixabay

Google is reportedly interested in purchasing US-based social video app Firework that lets users share short videos like Chinese player TikTok.

According to a report in The Wall Street Journal, Chinese micro-blogging platform Weibo had also shown interest in acquiring Firework but “talks with Google are further along”.

Based in Redwood City, California, Firework that entered India last month was valued at more than $100 million in a fundraising round earlier this year. TikTok’s parent, Beijing-based ByteDance, is valued around $75 billion.

irework is part of a suite of apps created by Loop Now Technologies, a start-up that focuses on next-generation consumer mobile applications.

Google, Social, Video
According to a report in The Wall Street Journal, Chinese micro-blogging platform Weibo had also shown interest in acquiring Firework but “talks with Google are further along”. Pixabay

Similar to Tiktok that allows users to post 15-seconed short videos, Firework allows users to create 30-second videos and with “Reveal”, its patent pending technology, it will allow creators to take both horizontal and vertical video in one shot from their mobile device.

The app is currently available on both iOS and Android smartphones with over a million registered users.

Firework has appointed Sunil Nair as CEO and MD for its India operations.

“My vision for Firework in India is to become more relevant and give our users every opportunity to stay meaningful and seamlessly experience a new view from their lens,” Nair said in a statement.

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In November last year, Facebook also quietly released a stand-alone app called “Lasso” to compete with TikTok.

On Lasso, which is currently available in the US, users can record themselves dancing and lip-syncing to music, similar to what they can do on TikTok.

In addition, Facebook recently roped in former Google employee Jason Toff for a key portfolio and the speculation is rife about the social networking giant preparing the global launch of its short video-sharing app. (IANS)