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Introduction of Bhagwad Gita for young minds

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By Yajush Gupta

Crumble the thought! It’s unconstitutional. What about secularism? what about article 15 and 25 of the Indian constitution? Is it not forcing religion on fragile minds of children?

And most importantly , Is it lawful?

These are just the kind of questions that come to mind.

Before we answer these questions, let’s decipher the Article 25 of the Indian Constitution. Law is about how we interpret it. And article 25 is perhaps, the most misinterpreted article in the Indian constitution. It guarantees the freedom to follow any religion and propagate it,yet this freedom comes with a responsibility to ensure that the public order,morality and health are not compromised in the process.

Now the important question is, does including Gita as part of school curriculum serve any purpose? Can it help the youth to develop into something better?

Haryana chief minister, Manohar Lal Khattar already decided to introduce Bhagavad Gita in schools last year. The proposed notion has been strongly misunderstood by many. It is important to understand the purpose, more like an offering for morality and spirituality.

If only we understand, Bhagwad Gita to be the eternal message of spiritual wisdom, from one of the most ancient Indian text, rather than a religious book. If we desperately want to preserve our vast culture and literature,and promise a better future for ourselves, how is it unfair? Also to study history of ancient India, it is necessary to study the Gita, simultaneously making sure to not harm the belief of any religious group, so as to grasp a better understanding of our countries ancient past.

Can there be a midway approach, so that no sentiments are hurt?

If the content to be taught is meticulously arranged,which can actually offer the students with values and truthfulness, unbiased to any religion, it would define the true meaning of education. The motto is not to preach any religion but to inculcate non-material knowledge into little minds so that roots are still bridged together with our rich ancient culture.
The scope of education and knowledge would be limitless. I mean, This is what education is about! Right?

Source://bhagavad-gita.org

Facts from://huffingtonpost.in //centreright.in

Contactme @yajush_gupta

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  • sudheer naik

    The teachings of Bhagwad Gita to students improves positive mindset.Students can know the difference between what is right to do and not to do.

  • Annesha Das Gupta

    Let’s see. As far as I can see, the decision is drowned up to its neck in power politics and playing the ‘majority card’. By saying ‘majority’, I mean, the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism. Oh, just consider the population of our country. We already have Hindu epics like Ramayana and Mahabharata in our middle-school curriculum ( including the English-mediums) and which preach what? True education? Misogynistic customs like Ram asking to Sita to give a ‘Agni Pariksha’ to prove her purity (read virginity) and the level of casteism in Mahabharata, don’t make me even start on it. Why there is no decision regarding implementation of Quran or Bible? Well, because you say it is a decision taken to foster morality and spirituality. But I say what about science, rationale and Atheism?

    • Yajush Gupta

      Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe,meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is Hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, at a convent.

      Mahabharata and Ramayana are “Sanskrit epics” ! They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-Hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Yajush Gupta

    Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe.
    meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, if you ever have studied in a convent.
    More over MAHABHARATA AND RAMAYANA ARE SANSKRIT EPICS. They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    Do not forget that even before court of law one has to swear by Geeta and not by Mahabharata or Ramayana or Bible. Bhagwad Geeta is not any religious or historical novel. The doctrine of Bhagwad Geeta guides humans to follow the path of truth and mankind.

  • sudheer naik

    The teachings of Bhagwad Gita to students improves positive mindset.Students can know the difference between what is right to do and not to do.

  • Annesha Das Gupta

    Let’s see. As far as I can see, the decision is drowned up to its neck in power politics and playing the ‘majority card’. By saying ‘majority’, I mean, the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism. Oh, just consider the population of our country. We already have Hindu epics like Ramayana and Mahabharata in our middle-school curriculum ( including the English-mediums) and which preach what? True education? Misogynistic customs like Ram asking to Sita to give a ‘Agni Pariksha’ to prove her purity (read virginity) and the level of casteism in Mahabharata, don’t make me even start on it. Why there is no decision regarding implementation of Quran or Bible? Well, because you say it is a decision taken to foster morality and spirituality. But I say what about science, rationale and Atheism?

    • Yajush Gupta

      Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe,meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is Hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, at a convent.

      Mahabharata and Ramayana are “Sanskrit epics” ! They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-Hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Yajush Gupta

    Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe.
    meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, if you ever have studied in a convent.
    More over MAHABHARATA AND RAMAYANA ARE SANSKRIT EPICS. They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    Do not forget that even before court of law one has to swear by Geeta and not by Mahabharata or Ramayana or Bible. Bhagwad Geeta is not any religious or historical novel. The doctrine of Bhagwad Geeta guides humans to follow the path of truth and mankind.

Next Story

Child Rights Summit: Nations Should Spend More on Education Over Weapons

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child rights summit
Displaced Syrian children look out from their tents at Kelbit refugee camp, near the Syrian-Turkish border, in Idlib province, Syria, Jan. 17, 2018. VOA

Countries should spend more on schooling and less on weapons to ensure that children affected by war get an education, a child rights summit heard Monday.

The gathering in Jordan was told that a common thread of war was its devastating impact in keeping children out of school.

Indian Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi, who founded the summit, said ensuring all children around the world received a primary and secondary education would cost another $40 billion annually — about a week’s worth of global military expenditure.

ALSO READ: Politics and Education: A Relationship that contributes a lot in shaping our Future

child rights summit
Nobel Peace Prize laureates Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai listen to speeches during the Nobel Peace Prize awards ceremony at the City Hall in Oslo, Dec. 10, 2014. VOA

“We have to choose whether we have to produce guns and bullets, or we have to produce books and pencils to our children,” he told the second Laureates and Leaders for Children Summit that gathers world leaders and Nobel laureates.

Global military expenditure reached almost $1.7 trillion in 2016, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. The United Nations children’s agency UNICEF said last year 27 million children were out of school in conflict zones.

ALSO READ: Exclusive: How is One Woman Army changing the notions of Education in society?

“We want safe schools, we want safe homes, we want safe countries, we want a safe world,” said Satyarthi, who shared the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai for his work with children.

Jordan’s Prince Ali bin al-Hussein told the summit, which focused on child refugees and migrants affected by war and natural disasters, that education was “key,” especially for “children on the move.”

“Education can be expensive, but never remotely as close to what is being spent on weapons. … They [children] are today’s hope for a better future,” he told the two-day summit.

Kerry Kennedy, president of Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights, a nonprofit group, described the number of Syrian refugees not in school in the Middle East as “shocking” as the war enters its eighth year.

Kennedy cited a report being released Tuesday by the KidsRights Foundation, an international children’s rights group, which found 40 percent of school-aged Syrian children living in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, and Iraq cannot access education. VOA