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Introduction of Bhagwad Gita for young minds

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By Yajush Gupta

Crumble the thought! It’s unconstitutional. What about secularism? what about article 15 and 25 of the Indian constitution? Is it not forcing religion on fragile minds of children?

And most importantly , Is it lawful?

These are just the kind of questions that come to mind.

Before we answer these questions, let’s decipher the Article 25 of the Indian Constitution. Law is about how we interpret it. And article 25 is perhaps, the most misinterpreted article in the Indian constitution. It guarantees the freedom to follow any religion and propagate it,yet this freedom comes with a responsibility to ensure that the public order,morality and health are not compromised in the process.

Now the important question is, does including Gita as part of school curriculum serve any purpose? Can it help the youth to develop into something better?

Haryana chief minister, Manohar Lal Khattar already decided to introduce Bhagavad Gita in schools last year. The proposed notion has been strongly misunderstood by many. It is important to understand the purpose, more like an offering for morality and spirituality.

If only we understand, Bhagwad Gita to be the eternal message of spiritual wisdom, from one of the most ancient Indian text, rather than a religious book. If we desperately want to preserve our vast culture and literature,and promise a better future for ourselves, how is it unfair? Also to study history of ancient India, it is necessary to study the Gita, simultaneously making sure to not harm the belief of any religious group, so as to grasp a better understanding of our countries ancient past.

Can there be a midway approach, so that no sentiments are hurt?

If the content to be taught is meticulously arranged,which can actually offer the students with values and truthfulness, unbiased to any religion, it would define the true meaning of education. The motto is not to preach any religion but to inculcate non-material knowledge into little minds so that roots are still bridged together with our rich ancient culture.
The scope of education and knowledge would be limitless. I mean, This is what education is about! Right?

Source://bhagavad-gita.org

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  • sudheer naik

    The teachings of Bhagwad Gita to students improves positive mindset.Students can know the difference between what is right to do and not to do.

  • Annesha Das Gupta

    Let’s see. As far as I can see, the decision is drowned up to its neck in power politics and playing the ‘majority card’. By saying ‘majority’, I mean, the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism. Oh, just consider the population of our country. We already have Hindu epics like Ramayana and Mahabharata in our middle-school curriculum ( including the English-mediums) and which preach what? True education? Misogynistic customs like Ram asking to Sita to give a ‘Agni Pariksha’ to prove her purity (read virginity) and the level of casteism in Mahabharata, don’t make me even start on it. Why there is no decision regarding implementation of Quran or Bible? Well, because you say it is a decision taken to foster morality and spirituality. But I say what about science, rationale and Atheism?

    • Yajush Gupta

      Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe,meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is Hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, at a convent.

      Mahabharata and Ramayana are “Sanskrit epics” ! They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-Hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Yajush Gupta

    Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe.
    meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, if you ever have studied in a convent.
    More over MAHABHARATA AND RAMAYANA ARE SANSKRIT EPICS. They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    Do not forget that even before court of law one has to swear by Geeta and not by Mahabharata or Ramayana or Bible. Bhagwad Geeta is not any religious or historical novel. The doctrine of Bhagwad Geeta guides humans to follow the path of truth and mankind.

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  • sudheer naik

    The teachings of Bhagwad Gita to students improves positive mindset.Students can know the difference between what is right to do and not to do.

  • Annesha Das Gupta

    Let’s see. As far as I can see, the decision is drowned up to its neck in power politics and playing the ‘majority card’. By saying ‘majority’, I mean, the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism. Oh, just consider the population of our country. We already have Hindu epics like Ramayana and Mahabharata in our middle-school curriculum ( including the English-mediums) and which preach what? True education? Misogynistic customs like Ram asking to Sita to give a ‘Agni Pariksha’ to prove her purity (read virginity) and the level of casteism in Mahabharata, don’t make me even start on it. Why there is no decision regarding implementation of Quran or Bible? Well, because you say it is a decision taken to foster morality and spirituality. But I say what about science, rationale and Atheism?

    • Yajush Gupta

      Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe,meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is Hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, at a convent.

      Mahabharata and Ramayana are “Sanskrit epics” ! They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-Hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Yajush Gupta

    Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe.
    meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, if you ever have studied in a convent.
    More over MAHABHARATA AND RAMAYANA ARE SANSKRIT EPICS. They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    Do not forget that even before court of law one has to swear by Geeta and not by Mahabharata or Ramayana or Bible. Bhagwad Geeta is not any religious or historical novel. The doctrine of Bhagwad Geeta guides humans to follow the path of truth and mankind.

Next Story

Conventional vs Unconventional Classroom

So where would you be learning, conventional or an unconventional classroom?

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online Training
Unlike the conventional learning in a classroom, online training makes the content available for students digitally. Flickr

Learning is the process of acquiring new skills or knowledge and for quite some time students have followed the process of enrolling in an offline centre to learn and study from the material provided but now, there is a new and an unconventional approach to upskilling yourself and that is through online learning.

While I was growing up, if I ever wanted to learn a new skill, I had to travel a minimum of 2-3 kms to the nearest learning or tuition centre to enquire and then enrol for the desired training. Though there were interactions with the teacher, but inhibitions got the better of me and with time, because of all the unresolved doubts, the learning started to become monotonous and I lost interest. But online learning has made that journey for a student interesting, fun and a cakewalk. You can relax in your seat while the knowledge is displayed on your screen and ask all that you wish to.

To begin with, what is online learning?

Unlike the conventional learning in a classroom, online learning makes the content available for students digitally. Students can learn online, anywhere and anytime. Instead of physical copies of books, e-learning uses visual content and gamification.

To help you understand the differences better I would like to compare both the classrooms and the learning associated on the basis of parameters that are essential for an overall learning.

1.       Affordability: 

In offline centres or conventional classrooms there are a lot of miscellaneous expenses incurred and hence the fee structure is designed accordingly.

Whereas in online learning, students’ aim is to learn so companies spend resources only on developing the content and thereby lowering the cost of the training.

From text to graphics, this software does it all. Pixabay
In offline centres or conventional classrooms there are a lot of miscellaneous expenses incurred and hence the fee structure is designed accordingly. Pixabay

2.       Flexibility and convenience:

In a conventional classroom, if you miss a class it gets difficult to grasp the topic and understand what is being taught. The classes have to be attended on fixed days
and timings, offering almost no flexibility. Whereas in online learning, the classes can be taken as per your availability and thus giving you an opportunity to design your own curriculum. You could also watch the classes over and understand the topics in-depth.

3.       Answers to your questions:

While learning, doubts might arise about the topic being taught but students usually hesitate in asking questions in a classroom. Whereas in online learning, you are an anonymous user and your doubts, as frivolous they may be, can be asked without any hesitation.
4.       Practical experience:
The learning journey in a conventional classroom is about reading and grasping, it involves little or none practical applications of the learnings. Whereas in online learning, the training is designed in such a manner that the content is informative and involves practical applications as well. The test and assignments in the module are made to ensure that the student has a holistic growth.

Also Read- Apple Watch Helps Users in US Take ECG

Only 20 percent of the five million students who graduate every year get employed, industry lobby Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India (ASSOCHAM) said in a report, published last year.

The competition is stiff and is going to get worse with time so It essential to make yourself stand out from the rest to increase your chances of getting hired. The certificate you will receive at the successful completion of the training will help in making the employer realise that you have relevant skills and in-depth knowledge about the subject.

So where would you be learning, conventional or an unconventional classroom?

About the Author: Sarvesh Agrawal is the Founder and CEO of Internshala, an internship and trainings platform. (Internshala.com)