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Introduction of Bhagwad Gita for young minds

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By Yajush Gupta

Crumble the thought! It’s unconstitutional. What about secularism? what about article 15 and 25 of the Indian constitution? Is it not forcing religion on fragile minds of children?

And most importantly , Is it lawful?

These are just the kind of questions that come to mind.

Before we answer these questions, let’s decipher the Article 25 of the Indian Constitution. Law is about how we interpret it. And article 25 is perhaps, the most misinterpreted article in the Indian constitution. It guarantees the freedom to follow any religion and propagate it,yet this freedom comes with a responsibility to ensure that the public order,morality and health are not compromised in the process.

Now the important question is, does including Gita as part of school curriculum serve any purpose? Can it help the youth to develop into something better?

Haryana chief minister, Manohar Lal Khattar already decided to introduce Bhagavad Gita in schools last year. The proposed notion has been strongly misunderstood by many. It is important to understand the purpose, more like an offering for morality and spirituality.

If only we understand, Bhagwad Gita to be the eternal message of spiritual wisdom, from one of the most ancient Indian text, rather than a religious book. If we desperately want to preserve our vast culture and literature,and promise a better future for ourselves, how is it unfair? Also to study history of ancient India, it is necessary to study the Gita, simultaneously making sure to not harm the belief of any religious group, so as to grasp a better understanding of our countries ancient past.

Can there be a midway approach, so that no sentiments are hurt?

If the content to be taught is meticulously arranged,which can actually offer the students with values and truthfulness, unbiased to any religion, it would define the true meaning of education. The motto is not to preach any religion but to inculcate non-material knowledge into little minds so that roots are still bridged together with our rich ancient culture.
The scope of education and knowledge would be limitless. I mean, This is what education is about! Right?

Source://bhagavad-gita.org

Facts from://huffingtonpost.in //centreright.in

Contactme @yajush_gupta

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  • sudheer naik

    The teachings of Bhagwad Gita to students improves positive mindset.Students can know the difference between what is right to do and not to do.

  • Annesha Das Gupta

    Let’s see. As far as I can see, the decision is drowned up to its neck in power politics and playing the ‘majority card’. By saying ‘majority’, I mean, the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism. Oh, just consider the population of our country. We already have Hindu epics like Ramayana and Mahabharata in our middle-school curriculum ( including the English-mediums) and which preach what? True education? Misogynistic customs like Ram asking to Sita to give a ‘Agni Pariksha’ to prove her purity (read virginity) and the level of casteism in Mahabharata, don’t make me even start on it. Why there is no decision regarding implementation of Quran or Bible? Well, because you say it is a decision taken to foster morality and spirituality. But I say what about science, rationale and Atheism?

    • Yajush Gupta

      Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe,meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is Hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, at a convent.

      Mahabharata and Ramayana are “Sanskrit epics” ! They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-Hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Yajush Gupta

    Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe.
    meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, if you ever have studied in a convent.
    More over MAHABHARATA AND RAMAYANA ARE SANSKRIT EPICS. They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    Do not forget that even before court of law one has to swear by Geeta and not by Mahabharata or Ramayana or Bible. Bhagwad Geeta is not any religious or historical novel. The doctrine of Bhagwad Geeta guides humans to follow the path of truth and mankind.

  • sudheer naik

    The teachings of Bhagwad Gita to students improves positive mindset.Students can know the difference between what is right to do and not to do.

  • Annesha Das Gupta

    Let’s see. As far as I can see, the decision is drowned up to its neck in power politics and playing the ‘majority card’. By saying ‘majority’, I mean, the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism. Oh, just consider the population of our country. We already have Hindu epics like Ramayana and Mahabharata in our middle-school curriculum ( including the English-mediums) and which preach what? True education? Misogynistic customs like Ram asking to Sita to give a ‘Agni Pariksha’ to prove her purity (read virginity) and the level of casteism in Mahabharata, don’t make me even start on it. Why there is no decision regarding implementation of Quran or Bible? Well, because you say it is a decision taken to foster morality and spirituality. But I say what about science, rationale and Atheism?

    • Yajush Gupta

      Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe,meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is Hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, at a convent.

      Mahabharata and Ramayana are “Sanskrit epics” ! They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-Hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Yajush Gupta

    Okay, to begin with “the largest or perhaps most wide spread religion in this world, will have to be Hinduism”. Seriously? to the best of my knowledge, India is the only Hindu country on the globe.
    meaning, not more than 15 % of the world population is hindu. And what’s wrong with introducing a book of spirituality in the school curriculum? I mean, we have no problem in reading a bible, if you ever have studied in a convent.
    More over MAHABHARATA AND RAMAYANA ARE SANSKRIT EPICS. They were never meant to preach anything, not at least morality. You can’t judge an epic war tale ! It’s like reading Ben-hur to learn something from it ! And lastly the majority card? we are a secular nation. It’s the minority card that works wonders here.

  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    Do not forget that even before court of law one has to swear by Geeta and not by Mahabharata or Ramayana or Bible. Bhagwad Geeta is not any religious or historical novel. The doctrine of Bhagwad Geeta guides humans to follow the path of truth and mankind.

Next Story

Savitribai Phule: The Pioneer Of The Women Education In India

Savitribai Phule fought for women’s education from the cultural patterns of the male-dominated society as a mission of her life

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Savitribai Phule along with her husband, Jyotirao Phule played a vital role in raising the women's rights in India during the British Rule. Wikimedia Commons
Savitribai Phule along with her husband, Jyotirao Phule played a vital role in raising the women's rights in India during the British Rule. Wikimedia Commons
  • Savitribai Phule was the first female teacher of the first women’s school in India
  • Savitribai Phule is regarded as a crucial asset in the social reform movement in Maharashtra
  • Savitribai Phule started her own school for girls education in Pune in 1848

Savitribai Phule is India’s first Modern feminist and a well-known social reformer who along with her husband, Jyotirao Phule played a vital role in raising the women’s rights in India during the British Rule. She was the first female teacher of the first women’s school in India and also considered as the pioneer of modern Marathi poetry. In 1852, Savitribai Phule opened a school for Untouchable girls which were a great challenge to take at that time.

Savitribai Phule was born on 3 January 1831 in Naigaon, Maharashtra, British India. She was married to 12-year-old Jyotirao Phule at the age of nine. Savitribai Phule is regarded as a crucial asset in the social reform movement in Maharashtra.

Battling for women education

Savitribai Phule fought for women’s education from the cultural patterns of the male-dominated society as a mission of her life. She worked towards tackling some of the then major social issues like women’s liberation, removal of untouchability and widow remarriages. Due to her efforts for women empowerment in the society, Savitribai Phule used to be followed by orthodox men and was abused by them in obscene language. People would target her with rotten eggs, cow dung, tomatoes, stones but she ignored all that, just to reach her school. After suffering so much, she once decided to give up but her husband, Jyotiba Phule came in full support for her. Jyotiba Phule encouraged his wife to continue with her cause.

Also Read: 15 Amazing Facts About The Revolutionary Bhagat Singh

But still, both husband and wife faced fierce resistance from the orthodox elements of society. Savitribai Phule got herself admitted to a training school and came out with flying colours with another Muslim lady, Fatima Sheikh. After that, she started her own school for girls education in Pune in 1848. Although, the response Savitribai Phule got was not that much uplifting but she was determined by what she was doing.

In 1852, Jyotirao Phule and Savitribai Phule were felicitated by the government for their commendable efforts in the field of education and other social causes. Wikimedia Commons
In 1852, Jyotirao Phule and Savitribai Phule were felicitated by the government for their commendable efforts in the field of education and other social causes. Wikimedia Commons

With the passage of time, people started to accept them and hence both husband and wife were able to open 5 more schools in the year 1848 itself. Taking a note of Savitribai Phule’s hard work, British government honoured her for her educational work. Jyotiba and Savitribai were also opposed to idol worship. For their work, both husband and wife were socially isolated and were attacked by the people whom they questioned.

The next big step that she took was to take a stand for widows. In those days, if a man used to die of old age or some sickness and the girls they had married were left, widows. The windows were treated like an unwanted piece of dump in the society. Widow’s head was shaved and they were not allowed to use any cosmetics that may make them look beautiful. Such a condition of widows moved Savitribai Phule and her husband. Thus, they went on for a protest to stop barbers from shaving the heads of widows.

Also Read: 10 Facts You Need To Know About Homi Bhabha

Here are some of the facts related to the life of Savitribai Phule and her husband, Jyotirao Phule during there struggling for various social causes.

  1. In 1897, Savitribai Phule with the full support of her son, Yashwantrao Gupta, opened a clinic to treat those affected by the pandemic of the bubonic plague when it appeared in the area around Nallasopara. As per records, she used to feed two thousand children every day during the time of the epidemic.
  2. Two books of her poems were published posthumously, Kavya Phule (1934) and Bavan Kashi Subodh Ratnakar (1982). Savitribai Phule wrote many poems against discrimination and advised to get educated. Being a poet and a philosopher and wrote on the importance of education and knowledge and removal of caste discrimination.
  3. In 2015, the University of Pune was renamed as Savitribai Phule Pune University to her honour deeds.
  4. Savitribai Phule died on 10 March 1897 while serving a plague patient.
  5. Google India Celebrate her Birthday January 3, 2017, with Doodle.
  6. Savitribai Phule was herself a victim of child marriage as she was married to Jyotirao Phule when she was only 12 years old.
  7. Savitribai Phule opened ‘Infanticide prohibition house’ care centre for pregnant rape victims and helped them to deliver their babies. She put up boards on streets about the “Delivery Home” for women, who were forced for their pregnancy. The delivery home was called “Balhatya  Pratibandhak Griha”.
  8. Savitribai Phule worked towards abolishing the caste-based and gender-based discrimination in the Indian society.
  9. In 1852, Jyotirao Phule and Savitribai Phule were felicitated by the government for their commendable efforts in the field of education and other social causes.
  10. After her marriage, Savitribai Phule enrolled herself in a training centre at Ms Farar’s Institution at Ahmednagar and in Ms Mitchell’s school in Pune.

Also Read: 10 Must-Know Facts About Subhas Chandra Bose

In 1852, Savitribai Phule opened a school for Untouchable girls which were a great challenge to take at that time.Wikimedia Commons
In 1852, Savitribai Phule opened a school for Untouchable girls which were a great challenge to take at that time.Wikimedia Commons

Savitribai Phule fought against all forms of social inequalities for any section of the society. They even moved by the plight of untouchables in the society. As untouchables were not allowed to take out water from the wells, meant for the upper caste. So, Savitribai Phule and Jyotiba Phule started their own reservoir of water for the untouchables in the vicinity of their house.