Monday January 20, 2020
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IOA Sets Limits to Fast-Rising Talents For Asiad 2018

A qualification criteria for the performers

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IOA Sets Limits to fast-rising talents For Asiad 2018
IOA Sets Limits to fast-rising talents For Asiad 2018. Pixabay

Apart from fast-rising talents, only the top-eight performers in team events and the top-six performers in individual events in the last four years’ continental competitions will be part of India’s contingent for the Asian Games later this year, the Indian Olympic Association (IOA) announced on Saturday.

IOA president Narinder Batra said that they have shared the qualification criteria with the sports federations at the Executive Council Meeting held earlier on Saturday.

The qualification criteria means that even if someone has crossed the performance criteria approved by the Olympic Council of Asia (OCA) but has not finished in the top-six in individual events in continental championships or the 2014 Asiad, he or she will not board the flight to Indonesia.

However, Batra said that IOA’s performance analysis team will consider athletes who would have shown upscale performances.

“This is the criteria set by us and athletes need to meet this criteria. Athletes need to earn the Indian jersey,” Batra declared at a press conference.

The IOA also announced that they have registered 2370 members, including athletes and officials, for the quadrennial showpiece to be held in Indonesia from August 18.

“The long list for the 18th Asian Games has also been submitted to the organisers of the event. We shall shortlist the final contingent at the conclusion of final selections by various federations,” explained Batra. The names of the shortlisted athletes will be finalised by June 30.

Batra also announced to submit Expression Of Interest for IOC Congress 2021 or onwards, Youth Olympic Games 2026, Asian Games 2030 and Olympic Games 2032.

Indian flag
Indian flag. Representational image, Pixabay

 

Batra also said that country should aim to win “double digit” medals at the Tokyo Olympics and around 20 at the 2024 games in Paris.

The IOA president feels that a good show will then help them gain public support in its bid to host the 2032 Summer Games.

Meanwhile, IOA Secretary General Rajeev Mehta said that the dates for the upcoming National Games are yet to be finalised. According to Mehta, IOA wants it to take place in December but the 36th National Games’ organising state Goa is asking for some time and plans to host it in February.

Mehta said that during the Goa National Games, at least four events, namely cycling, shooting, kayaking and canoeing will not take place in the western state. While Delhi is to host shooting, Kerala will organise the rest of the three. Mehta also said that Karnataka may host hockey and tennis events of the National Games.

Mehta also announced the formation of an Associate Category within IOA to incorporate the disciplines which are not part of Olympics, Commonwealth Games and Asian Games programmes. “There are some sports federation which are registered with OCA but not with the IOA. Those will be part of the Associate Category,” Mehta reckoned.

However, the Associate Category will not have voting rights within the IOA.

The IOA also announced the formation of various committees like Arbitration Committee, 2024 Olympic Games Preparation Committee.

“The additional committees and new commissions have been set up to help us achieve our ambitions as a rising sporting nation. It’s imperative for the IOA to make sure there are action points to every review and a thorough process is followed for every global event,” Batra said.

“From EOI for hosting global events to announcing new committees and commissions, it’s all formally plotted in our future roadmap,” Batra concluded.

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During the meeting, it was also decided that no parents of athletes will be part of the country’s contingent for the Asiad. During the Gold Coast CWG held in April, the inclusion of Saina Nehwal’s father was controversial. (IANS)

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Study Says, Excess Physical Activity Can Be Harmful for Athletes

The researchers believe that fatigue and reduced cognitive control might also constitute the first stage in the development of a "burnout syndrome"

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Athletes
This excessive physical activity in Athletes leads to reduced activity of the lateral prefrontal cortex (a key region for cognitive control), similar to that observed during mental effort. Pixabay

Researchers have found that, in top Athletes, excess physical activity could be harmful and also associated with major fatigue and reduced performances.

The study published in the journal Current Biology shows that intensive physical training could harm brain capacity, particularly cognitive control.

For the findings, Mathias Pessiglione and his team from Inserm Research Institute in France said that they were interested in identifying the causes of a common phenomenon in top athletes, known as “overtraining syndrome”.

This was characterised by reduced athletic performance and intense fatigue.

Athletes suffering from this syndrome might be tempted by products likely to restore their performance.

The primary hypothesis of the researchers were clear: the fatigue caused by overtraining is similar to that caused by mental efforts.

To test this idea, the team spent nine weeks working with 37 triathletes, who were split into two groups.

The first underwent the “usual” high-level training whereas the second had additional training during the last three weeks of the experiment, with sessions lasting 40 per cent longer, on average.

From this, the researchers were able to identify similarities between overly intensive physical training and excessive mental work.

Athletes
Researchers have found that, in top Athletes, excess physical activity could be harmful and also associated with major fatigue and reduced performances. Pixabay

This excessive physical activity leads to reduced activity of the lateral prefrontal cortex (a key region for cognitive control), similar to that observed during mental effort.

This reduction in brain activity was associated with impulsive decision-making, in which short-term gratification was prioritised over long-term goals.

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In the case of top athletes, being this impulsive could lead to their decision to stop right in the middle of a performance or to abandon a race in order to end the pain felt during physical exertion.

The researchers believe that fatigue and reduced cognitive control might also constitute the first stage in the development of a “burnout syndrome”, which affects many people across various professional sectors. (IANS)