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Irom Sharmila unlikely to appear in court this time

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New Delhi: The Iron Lady, charged with attempt to suicide is probably not going to appear in Delhi’s Patiala House court this time. Irom Sharmila is supposed to be present on February 3 and 4, however, may miss it due to the failure of Manipur authorities to sanction travelling expenses for her and her team.

Rs 1.40 lakh which was supposed to be sanctioned by the home department of the Manipur government for travelling expense for Sharmila and her team has not been passed. The same has happened in the past as well.

According to the jail manual, she has to be accompanied by police, jail and medical staff while travelling to Delhi.

She is undergoing trial under Section 309 of the IPC (attempt to commit suicide).

She is on fast unto death since November 4, 2000, demanding a repeal of the Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act, 1958.

It was imposed in Manipur on September 8, 1980, as the foreign trained insurgents got the upper hand. One amicus curiae is representing her.

This act permits her detention for a whole year and at the end of each year, she will be ritually released. But due to her continuation of fast outside the jail, she is always rearrested.

On October 6, 2006, she rushed to Delhi to carry out her fast at Jantar Mantar, after being released by the court of chief judicial magistrate, Imphal west.

All this time, she has denied the charge of attempt to commit suicide.

She said, “I love my life and want to live. I am using fast as a weapon to achieve my goal”.

Imphal west, the district and sessions court, on January 22, 2015, ordered her release finding her not guilty of the charge. But later, was rearrested on the same charge.

A Romenkumar, a high court advocate said the prosecution should file a petition for appeal or revision within three months of the court order. After expiry of this period, the order reaches finality and becomes the rule of the law.

Under the circumstances, the arrest of Sharmila under the same charge is questionable.(IANS)

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Physical illness And injury Raises The Risk of Suicide in Men, Not Women: Study

The researchers also found new potential risk patterns, including that diagnoses and prescriptions four years before a suicide were more important to prediction than diagnoses

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Men
Suicide is incredibly challenging to predict, because every suicide death is the result of multiple interacting risk factors in one's life, Especially for Men. Pixabay

When it comes to identify who is more at suicide risk, scientists have found that physical illness and injury raises the risk of Suicide in Men but not women, along with a plethora of other insights into the complex factors that may increase a person’s risk of suicide.

The study, led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and published in JAMA Psychiatry, is the first to use data from the population of an entire country (Denmark) and parse it with a Machine Learning (ML) system to identify suicide risk factors.

“Suicide is incredibly challenging to predict, because every suicide death is the result of multiple interacting risk factors in one’s life,” said lead study author Dr Jaimie Gradus, associate professor of epidemiology at BUSPH.

Dr Gradus and her colleagues looked at thousands of factors in the health histories of 14,103 individuals who died from suicide in the country from 1995 through 2015, and the health histories of 265,183 other Danes in the same period, using a machine-learning system to look for patterns.

Many of the study’s findings confirmed previously-identified risk factors, such as psychiatric disorders and related prescriptions.

Men
When it comes to identify who is more at suicide risk, scientists have found that physical illness and injury raises the risk of Suicide in Men but not women, along with a plethora of other insights into the complex factors that may increase a person’s risk of suicide. Pixabay

The researchers also found new potential risk patterns, including that diagnoses and prescriptions four years before a suicide were more important to prediction than diagnoses and prescriptions six months before, and that physical health diagnoses were particularly important to men’s suicide prediction but not women’s.

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“The findings of this study do not create a model for perfectly predicting suicide”, said Dr Gradus, in part because medical records rarely include the more immediate experiences — such as the loss of a job or relationship — that combine with these longer-term factors to precipitate suicide.

The findings, however, point to new factors to examine in working to prevent this persistent public health issue. (IANS)