Tuesday January 21, 2020
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Is Your Relationship Suffering Due to Mobile Technology?

If your partner is using their mobile phone a huge amount, it can even create paranoia as you may think they are up to no good

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While his agency said the risks to rats don’t directly apply to people, the study raises safety questions. Pixabay

We all know that relationships have to be worked on in order to keep the spark going but there are many things that can get in the way of this. When you lead busy lifestyles, have the responsibility of family life to manage, have financial issues to sort out, and have other commitments that get in the way of spending time together, things can get very difficult. Over recent years, there is one more thing that has affected many relationships and this is mobile technology.

Mobile technology has become hugely popular and has a positive effect on our lives in many ways. We can work more easily and flexibly, browse the Internet, contact friends and family, make purchases, enjoy entertainment, and much more thanks to this technology. However, the downside is that some people become obsessed with mobile technology and the services that they can access on these devices, and this can really get in the way of a relationship.

Improving your communication and enjoying more quality time

Every couple must try to spend quality time together to improve communication
Every couple must try to spend quality time together to improve communication. Pixabay

When it comes to mobile phones, there are many people that are barely ever seen without their device in their hand. While it is find to use your phone while out and about or when making and taking calls, spending more time on your device rather than talking to your partner can cause a lot of issues. If you already get little enough time to work on your relationship, the last thing you want is to find that your partner is more interested in their phone during the short periods you do get to spend together. This is why it is important to talk and lay down some ground rules when it comes to mobile phone usage as a couple.

If your partner is using their mobile phone a huge amount, it can even create paranoia as you may think they are up to no good. Many people have gone onto their partner’s social media accounts or used tools to find out whose phone number is on their partner’s log because they have become suspicious. Often, it is all perfectly innocent but that doesn’t mean that you won’t become worried or paranoid if your partner spends more time on their mobile device than they do talking to you.

It is important for both partners to be aware of the ground rules when it comes to mobile phone use. Of course, if you have an urgent call or a family member needs to get in touch you should take the call. However, when you are both snuggling up to watch a movie and one of you then goes on their phone and starts messing around on social media, it can ruin the whole experience. When you spend time together, it should be quality time where you can talk, watch films, listen to music, go out for meals, and do other things you enjoy rather than just watching one another using mobile phones in total silence.

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Women Who Have Less Sex Experience an Early Menopause: Study

Having less sex linked to earlier menopause

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Women who reported having sexual activity weekly were 28 per cent less likely to have experienced menopause than those who had sex less than once a month. Lifetime Stock

Women who have sex more often are less likely to have an early menopause, researchers say, adding that women who reported having sexual activity weekly were 28 per cent less likely to have experienced menopause than those who had sex less than once a month.

While the study, published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, didn’t look at the reason for the link, the researchers said that the physical cues of sex may signal to the body that there is a possibility of getting pregnant.

But for women who aren’t having sex frequently in midlife, an earlier menopause may make more biological sense, the study said.

“The findings of our study suggest that if a woman is not having sex, and there is no chance of pregnancy, then the body ‘chooses’ not to invest in ovulation, as it would be pointless,” said study researcher Megan Arnot from University College London in the US.

“There may be a biological energetic trade-off between investing energy into ovulation and investing elsewhere, such as keeping active by looking after grandchildren,” Arnot added.

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Women who aren’t having sex frequently in midlife, an earlier menopause may make more biological sense. Lifetime Stock

During ovulation, the woman’s immune function is impaired, making the body more susceptible to disease, the study said.

Given a pregnancy is unlikely due to a lack of sexual activity, then it would not be beneficial to allocate energy to a costly process, especially if there is the option to invest resources into existing kin.

The research is based on data collected from 2,936 women, recruited as the baseline cohort for the SWAN study in 1996/1997.

The women were asked to respond to several questions, including whether they had engaged in sex with their partner in the past six months, the frequency of sex including whether they engaged in sexual intercourse, oral sex, sexual touching or caressing in the last six months and whether they had engaged in self-stimulation in the past six months.

The most frequent pattern of sexual activity was weekly (64 per cent).

Interviews were carried out over a ten-year follow-up period, during which 1,324 (45 per cent) of the 2,936 women experienced a natural menopause at an average age of 52.

By modelling the relationship between sexual frequency and the age of natural menopause, women of any age who had sex weekly had a hazard ratio of 0.72, whereas women of any age who had sex monthly had a hazard ratio of 0.81.

This provided a likelihood whereby women of any age who had sex weekly were 28 per cent less likely to experience the menopause compared to those who had sex less than monthly.

Likewise, those who had sex monthly were 19 per cent less likely to experience menopause at any given age compared to those who had sex less than monthly.

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The study also tested whether living with a male partner affected menopause as a proxy to test whether exposure to male pheromones delayed menopause.

The researchers found no correlation, regardless of whether the male was present in the household or not. (IANS)