Tuesday March 31, 2020
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Now China under ISIS radar

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New Delhi: With the release of a four-minute song “We are jihadi” in Mandarin, terror outfit ISIS stamped their presence in China.

Indian government might have played down the incident of ISIS flags fluttering in Srinagar prior to Prime Minister’s historic address in November. But the release of the song in China definitely testifies the presence of ISIS influence in the Indian subcontinent.

Reportedly, a US-based Kashmiri was behind the hoisting of the ISIS flag. He also released a video revealing the atrocities on Muslims in Gaza. The release of the video was aimed at instilling the idea of ‘jihad’ among the youths of Kashmir.

Notably, Pakistani and Islamic state flags are waved by Hurriyat supporters every Friday which results in disrupting the peace and stability of the region.

However, the ISIS went a step further by releasing the song was to expand their influence in India’s biggest neighbouring nation, China. The song provoked the Muslims in China to take up arms and fight for their just rights. Analysts on Monday said the song, released on Sunday by the ISIS propaganda website “Jihadology”, attempted to strengthen its presence in the country.

The song said: “It’s our dream to die fighting on the battlefield”, “No power could stop us from moving forward”, “Pick up your weapons to revolt” and “The shameless enemy would panic”.

It might be mentioned that this was the first time such a song was released by the outfit to influence the Muslims in China. It was also the first instance when the outfit made a bold attempt to recruit from the country.

Notably, Muslims from China’s Xinjiang Uygur region migrated to Syria and Iraq via Turkey to join the ISIS. It was expected that these militants would return to China and carry out subversive activities in the region.

(With inputs from agencies)

(Picture Credit: abcnews.go.com)

Next Story

Chinese Scientists Develop Nanomaterial To Combat Novel Coronavirus

According to the US NIH, scientists have not unanimously settled on a precise definition of nanomaterials, but agree that they are partially characterized by their tiny size, measured in nanometers

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Coronavirus
According to Global Times, the new weapon is not a drug or a compound but some nanomaterial. Pixabay

A team of Chinese scientists has reportedly developed a novel way to combat the new coronavirus that causes the Covid-19 disease which has killed over 32,000 people globally.

According to Global Times, the new weapon is not a drug or a compound but some nanomaterial. “Chinese scientists have developed a new weapon to combat the #coronavirus,” the news portal tweeted on Sunday.

“They say they have found a nanomaterial that can absorb and deactivate the virus with 96.5-99.9 per cent efficiency,” it added.

Nanomaterials are used in a variety of manufacturing processes, products and healthcare including paints, filters, insulation and lubricant additives.

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In healthcare, Nanozymes are nanomaterials with enzyme-like characteristics.

Coronavirus
A team of Chinese scientists has reportedly developed a novel way to combat the new coronavirus that causes the Covid-19 disease which has killed over 32,000 people globally. Pixabay

According to the US NIH, scientists have not unanimously settled on a precise definition of nanomaterials, but agree that they are partially characterized by their tiny size, measured in nanometers.

“Nanotechnology can be used to design pharmaceuticals that can target specific organs or cells in the body such as cancer cells, and enhance the effectiveness of therapy,” said NIH.

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However, while engineered nanomaterials provide great benefits, “we know very little about the potential effects on human health and the environment. Even well-known materials, such as silver for example, may pose a hazard when engineered to nano size,” according to NIH. (IANS)