Tuesday August 20, 2019
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Now China under ISIS radar

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New Delhi: With the release of a four-minute song “We are jihadi” in Mandarin, terror outfit ISIS stamped their presence in China.

Indian government might have played down the incident of ISIS flags fluttering in Srinagar prior to Prime Minister’s historic address in November. But the release of the song in China definitely testifies the presence of ISIS influence in the Indian subcontinent.

Reportedly, a US-based Kashmiri was behind the hoisting of the ISIS flag. He also released a video revealing the atrocities on Muslims in Gaza. The release of the video was aimed at instilling the idea of ‘jihad’ among the youths of Kashmir.

Notably, Pakistani and Islamic state flags are waved by Hurriyat supporters every Friday which results in disrupting the peace and stability of the region.

However, the ISIS went a step further by releasing the song was to expand their influence in India’s biggest neighbouring nation, China. The song provoked the Muslims in China to take up arms and fight for their just rights. Analysts on Monday said the song, released on Sunday by the ISIS propaganda website “Jihadology”, attempted to strengthen its presence in the country.

The song said: “It’s our dream to die fighting on the battlefield”, “No power could stop us from moving forward”, “Pick up your weapons to revolt” and “The shameless enemy would panic”.

It might be mentioned that this was the first time such a song was released by the outfit to influence the Muslims in China. It was also the first instance when the outfit made a bold attempt to recruit from the country.

Notably, Muslims from China’s Xinjiang Uygur region migrated to Syria and Iraq via Turkey to join the ISIS. It was expected that these militants would return to China and carry out subversive activities in the region.

(With inputs from agencies)

(Picture Credit: abcnews.go.com)

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Can Huawei’s HarmonyOS be Successful Outside China?

Can Huawei pull off its HarmonyOS outside China?

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A possible alternative to Android and iOS is finally here -- in Huawei HarmonyOS. Pixabay

Over the last decade, the smartphone operating system (OS) business has become a duopoly. Either you have Apples iPhones running on iOS or a device powered by Googles Android.

A possible alternative to Android and iOS is finally here — in Huawei HarmonyOS. Can it win the love of consumers who are on Android or iOS for years? According to Neil Shah, Research Director at Counterpoint Research, it won’t be easy for Huawei to break the duopoly of Apple and Google. Beyond China, there are two key challenges for Harmony OS in the global market.

“Firstly, to attract global developers to optimize apps for HarmonyOS and integrate other monetization options via Harmony software development kit (SDKs) at scale. This is something other OS providers were not able to do — for example Microsoft with Windows Phone,” Shah told IANS.

“Secondly, from a smartphones perspective, it is not fully complete until HarmonyOS features quality, diverse apps, AI, services, user-experience, support for multiple technologies, and ad platform integration, with respect to Android Google Mobile Services (GMS),” he explained.

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Developing an ecosystem of partners and developers to create applications and services for a platform is hard. Pixabay

Building and maintaining app stores in each country along with localization options, developer support, GDPR guidelines and security scanning, all with huge overheads, is a massive undertaking. “Further, issuing regular security patches and software updates, while the platform is open to millions of disparate devices, will be resource-intensive and costly,” said Shah.

Working with different global operators is going to be another challenge if the value is just captured by Huawei or close partners. At some point, to maintain openness and scale, Huawei will have to spin off HarmonyOS into a separate entity to drive the growth of the platform. According to Julie Ask, Vice President and Principal Analyst, eBusiness & Channel Strategy Professionals at Forrester, it’s a smart and long-overdue move by Huawei.

“The owner of the operating systems on smartphones (and a host of other devices) has far more market power than simply hardware manufacturers. Fundamentally, it’s a window or data and insights on every user of that phone – even if just under the pretense of collecting data to improve the product in the long term,” Ask told IANS. The open question is: Can Huawei pull it off?

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Necessity is the mother of invention applies well to Huawei. Pixabay

“Samsung has tried. Nokia (and employees of Nokia) tried. Developing an ecosystem of partners and developers to create applications and services for a platform is hard. While hard, Huawei has the advantages of a large home marketing (China) plus some financial freedom to pursue a large – and what could be long-term strategic initiative like this,” she elaborated. Could the HarmonyOS be a threat to other OS developed by the US companies like Google?

“In China, yes. Because China has a unique digital ecosystem that foreign Internet companies like Google don’t have the advantages to adapt to it very well,” said Xiaofeng Wang, Senior Analyst at Forrester.

Being a local Chinese company/brand, it would be easier for Huawei/HarmonyOS to build a well-rounded mobile ecosystem given its familiarity of the digital ecosystem there and the large scale of Huawei’s mobile phone penetration. “Plus, Chinese consumers are growing preferences on home-grown brands; and Chinese brands are doing better in marketing and engaging with Chinese consumers,” Wang told IANS.

Also Read: Alexandre Aja’s Love for Horror Lead to Great Success

Shah added: “Necessity is the mother of invention applies well to Huawei, though it will have to remain inventive and prudent on how to scale outside China if forced to, and make sure it has everything in place it is in harmony with the industry and consumers.” The Chinese conglomerate has indicated that it won’t be migrating to HarmonyOS for smartphones, unless it is completely cut-off from Google Android’s access outside China.

When the time is right, and Huawei has more developers working on HarmonyOS, they might take full advantage of the scalability of the micro-kernel architecture the OS provides. (IANS)