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Muslim sects unite to decry interference in personal laws

Muslim registered their protest against what they termed was "the government's interference in personal laws

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Representational image. Pixabay

Mumbai, October 17, 2016: In a rare display of solidarity, Islamic scholars and clerics of all Muslim sects on Monday attacked the government for trying to introduce a Uniform Civil Code.

The scholars and clerics from Sunni, Shia, Barelvi, Deobandi and Ahlehadi sects registered their protest against what they termed was “the government’s interference in personal laws”.

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In a joint statement issued after a brainstorming session, the leaders took umbrage to the Centre’s proposals on Triple Talaq and other practices which they said would violate their personal laws.

“Any interference in Muslim Personal Law will not be tolerated. Any efforts to impose a Uniform Civil Code in the name of social reform and gender justice will prove counterproductive,” they said.

The President of All India Ulema Council, Maulana Zaherudin Khan, condemned the move of banning Triple Talaq as a conspiracy to impose a Uniform Civil Code which he said was opposed by most Muslims.

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“We will boycott this questionnaire. No Muslim will respond to it because it is misleading and deceitful. The Uniform Civil Code is divisive and will lead to social unrest,” he cautioned.

“The government should respect this position of the Muslims instead of conspiring to forcibly put an end to it,” said Darul Uloom Mohamadiya’s President Maulana Sayed M.K. Ashraf.

“It cannot force Muslims to follow other communities in issues related to personal laws as it tantamount to an infringement on their fundamental rights,” Ashraf said.

He said that Muslims clamouring against Triple Talaq and demanding a ban on polygamy “are a miniscule minority who do not represent the sentiments of the majority of Indian Muslims”.

All Indian Ulema Association President Maulana Sayed Athar Ali urged the government to refrain from interfering in the beliefs and religions of all citizens.

“Muslims consider divorce, polygamy and other personal laws as an intrinsic part of their religion and are obliged to follow the Sharia in these matters,” Maulana Ali pointed out.

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The latest move comes shortly after the All India Muslim Personal Law Board (AIMPLB) came out strongly against Triple Talaq.

The meeting in Mumbai was chaired by Maulana Ashraf and attended by AIUC President Maulana Khan; Mushwarat President Naveed Hamid; AIMPLB executive committee member Maulana Sayed Athar Ali; All India Jamiat Islami Vice-President Maulana Nusrat; Imam of Haji Ali Dargah, Mumbai, Maulana Mohammed Islam; Shia scholar Maulana Asgar Haideri and Ahlehadis scholar Maulana Asgar Imam Salfi.(IANS)

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Ban ‘Triple Talaq’: India Criminalizes Centuries-Old Practice of Sudden Divorce Among Muslims

The bill sets a fine and a jail sentence of up to three years for men convicted of using the practice

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FILE - Indian Muslims protest against the government approving an ordinance to implement a top court ruling striking down a Muslim practice that allows men to instantly divorce in Mumbai, India, Sept. 19, 2018. VOA

India’s parliament has passed a measure to criminalize the centuries-old practice of instant divorce among Muslims and punish men with jail terms if they defy a ban on what is known as “triple talaq.”

The government said a law was necessary because there have been instances of Muslim men continuing to terminate marriages by repeating the Arabic word “talaq” three times, although the practice was outlawed by India’s Supreme Court in 2017.

The bill sets a fine and a jail sentence of up to three years for men convicted of using the practice. It will become law as soon as the president signs it. In a tweet, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said “an archaic and medieval practice has finally been confined to the dustbins of history,” and it “corrects a historical wrong done to Muslim women.”

The measure, called the Muslim Women Protection of Rights on Marriage Bill, was passed in the upper house of parliament amid protests from the main opposition Congress party,  which opposed setting a prison term for offenders and wanted further scrutiny of the bill.

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Indian Muslims stand outside Parliament House in New Delhi, India, Friday, July 26, 2019. VOA

Critics of the law say it is a harsh measure that’s open to misuse and is being used by the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party to target Muslims. Law Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad defended the bill, saying it was necessary to protect the dignity and honor of Muslim women and ensure gender justice.

The bill’s passage is seen as a major victory for Modi’s government, which failed to pass it during Modi’s first term in office. The bill had been passed by the lower house last week, but all eyes were on Tuesday’s vote because the government does not have a majority in the Upper House. It passed 99 to 84.

The practice of “triple talaq” has long been banned in several Muslim countries like Egypt, Bangladesh and Pakistan but continued in India.

Zakia Soman, a cofounder of the Bharatiya Muslim Mahila Andolan (BMMA) organization, which was at the forefront of the legal battle to scrap “triple talaq,” welcomed passage of the bill. “It will not change our lives overnight, but it would give strength to the movement for justice for Muslim women,” according to Soman. She said “it was a moment to rejoice.”

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If we don’t cry now, Triple Talaq, and such other vices, might go digital, and burn millions of households. VOA

Women rights activists had cited many cases where men had divorced women via letter, telephone and, increasingly, by text message, WhatsApp and Skype by uttering or writing the three words. They said what was practiced in India was a misinterpretation of Islamic law.

Conservative Muslim clerics, however, had staunchly opposed efforts to scrap “triple talaq,” calling it a religious issue that should not be interfered with. Although India’s constitution guarantees equality, it allows matters such as marriage, divorce and alimony to be governed by religious laws.

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Tahir Mahmood, an expert on Islamic law, said he hoped the law would act as a deterrent on Muslim men divorcing wives in an arbitrary manner. He said the practice should not have been made a criminal offense, but he pointed out that religious leaders of the community had failed to do anything to curb the practice.

Some scholars of Sharia law call “triple talaq” a travesty of divorce as envisaged in the Quran. They say the word has to be pronounced over three months and accompanied by efforts at reconciliation. (VOA)