Friday April 19, 2019
Home Lead Story ISRO Puts Emi...

ISRO Puts Emisat, 28 Foreign Satellites into Orbit

India will also launch two more defence satellites some time in July or August with its new rocket Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV)

0
//
credit: static.dnaindia.com

By Venkatachari Jagannathan

The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on Monday put Emisat — an electronic intelligence satellite for the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) — and 28 other foreign satellites into orbit in a copybook style.

With Monday’s launch, India has successfully put into orbit 297 foreign satellites to date.

So far, Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) rocket has put into orbit nation’s 46 satellites, including 10 satellites built by students from Indian universities.

Notable aspects of this space mission are the flying of a new variant of PSLV, switching off and on the fourth stage engine couple of times and the use of the fourth stage as an orbital platform carrying three experimental payloads.

After the successful launch, space agency’s Chairman K. Sivan said: “Today the PSLV has successfully injected the ISRO-made Emisat satellite into its intended orbit and 28 customer satellites at a 504-km altitude.

“The mission is special for the ISRO on many counts as it was the first time a PSLV rocket was launched with four strap-on motors; the mission has three different orbits for the very first time; the fourth stage was made an orbital platform for experiments; and there was also a new team for the PSLV.”

Sivan said the industry contributed a lot for the building of the rocket and satellite.

“Ninety-five per cent of the rocket hardware and 60-65 per cent of satellite components were fabricated by the industry,” he said.

At 9.27 a.m, the PSLV rocket standing at 44.5 metres tall and weighing 239 tonne with a one-way ticket, hurtled itself towards the skies.

With the fierce orange flame at its tail lighting, the rocket slowly gathered speed and went up.

Heeding to the demand of the public to view the rocket launch, Sivan said that a viewers’ gallery was built and 1,200 people enjoyed spectacle.

He said for the next mission about 5,000 people will be allowed to witness the launch.

ISRO
Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) Chairman K. Sivan, left, and Junior Indian Minister for Department of Atomic Energy and Space Jitendra Singh address a news conference in New Delhi. VOA

The PSLV is a four-stage engine expendable rocket with alternating solid and liquid fuel. In its normal configuration, the rocket will have six strap-on motors hugging its first stage.

On January 24, the ISRO flew a PSLV with two strap-on motors, while in March, it had four strap-on motors.

The space agency also has two more PSLV variants — Core Alone (without any strap-on motors) and the larger PSLV-XL.

The ISRO selects the kind of rocket to be used based on the weight of satellites it carries.

Forty-seven seconds after the launch, the Emisat was ejected at an altitude of about 753 km.

Meanwhile, at about 60 minutes after the PSLV’s lift-off, its fourth stage was restarted and run for about 10 seconds before it was cut off again.

At about 108 minutes after the lift-off, the rocket’s fourth stage was again restarted for few seconds before it was again cut off.

Finally, at about 110 minutes, the first of the 28 foreign satellites were ejected and in five minutes, they were put into orbit.

Later, the fourth stage was restarted and stopped twice to bring its altitude to 485 km at the end of three hours after the lift-off.

Also Read- Social Media Giant Facebook Removes 687 Fake Accounts, Pages Linked to Congress

At this point, the fourth stage began its role as the orbital platform for three experimental payloads: (a) Automatic Identification System (AIS) from ISRO for Maritime satellite applications capturing messages transmitted from ships (b) Automatic Packet Repeating System (APRS) from AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation), India – to assist amateur radio operators in tracking and monitoring position data and (c) Advanced Retarding Potential Analyser for Ionospheric Studies (ARIS) from Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology (IIST) – for the structural and compositional studies of ionosphere, the space agency said.

As regards future missions, Sivan said the next PSLV rocket will carry RISAT and it will be followed by another PSLV launch carrying Cartosat-3 satellite.

India will also launch two more defence satellites some time in July or August with its new rocket Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV). (IANS)

Next Story

CMFRI, ISRO Join Hands to Protect Coastal Wetlands

“Wetlands are highly prospective for some selective aquaculture ventures which will help the local people earn economical gains” he added

0

In an effort to build resilience against the impact of climate change on wetlands, the Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI) and the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) have teamed up to map, validate and protect smaller wetlands in the coastal region and restore them through coastal livelihood programmes.

This is the first time that a fisheries institute is collaborating with the ISRO to develop a comprehensive climate resilient framework for fisheries and wetlands.

A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed between the CMFRI and the Space Applications Centre (SAC) of the ISRO to develop a mobile app and a centralised web portal with complete database of wetlands in the country which were smaller than 2.25 hectares.

Such smaller wetlands cover an area of more than 5 lakh hectares across the country, with Kerala alone having as many as 2,592 such wetlands.

According to the MoU, the two institutes will identify and demarcate the wetlands and restore the degraded ones through suitable livelihood options such as coastal aquaculture.

The mobile app will be used for real-time monitoring of the wetlands and giving advisories to the stakeholders and the coastal people.

climate, global warming, celsisu, oceansac
A fisherman stands on his boat as he fishes at the Tisma lagoon wetland park, also designated as Ramsar Site 1141 in the Convention on Wetlands, in Tisma, Nicaragua. VOA

The collaborative move is part of a national framework for fisheries and wetlands recently developed by the National Innovations in Climate Resilient Agriculture (NICRA), a project of the CMFRI.

The NICRA project aims to find ways and means to mitigate the impact of climate change on marine fisheries and coastal region. According to the MoU, the National Wetland Atlas, already developed by the SAC, will be updated with real-time data of physical, chemical and biological parameters of the wetlands to be provided by the CMFRI.

P.U. Zacharia, who is attached to the NICRA project, said the real-time data of the demarcated coastal wetlands would greatly help in developing a conservation plan for the degraded wetlands in the region, besides utilising these resources for livelihood prospects in the area such as shrimp and crab farming.

Also Read- Samsung India to Launch Galaxy A70 Next Week

“Smaller wetlands across the country are in a highly neglected state owing to multiple reasons. Climate variability induced rainfall drastically changes the physio-chemical characteristics of such wetlands, which was evidently seen during the devastating floods in Kerala last year.

“The collaborative initiative will help develop a comprehensive wetland information system which could facilitate the village-level wetland advisories to the local people by scientific communities,” Zacharia said.

“Wetlands are highly prospective for some selective aquaculture ventures which will help the local people earn economical gains” he added. (IANS)