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ISRO Showcases The Statue of Vikram Sarabhai, The Space Pioneer

Sarabahi was awarded (posthumously) the Padma Vibhushan in 1972, Padma Bhushan in 1966 and Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar medal in 1962.

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Private agencies will also participate in the mission. Flickr commons
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Marking the 99th birth anniversary of India’s space pioneer Vikram Sarabhai, the state-run Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on Sunday unveiled his bust at its headquarters here.

The space agency’s former chairmen K. Kasturirangan and A.S. Kiran Kumar and incumbent Chairman K. Sivan were present on the occasion at the Antriksh Bhavan.

Sarabhai was born on August 12, 1919, in Ahmedabad. Gujarat. He died on December 30, 1971, at the age of 52 at Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala.

Vikram Sarabhai
The space agency will mark Sarabhai’s birth centenary in 2019. Flickr Commons

As the founding father of the Indian space programme, Sarabhai set up the Physical Research Laboratory in Ahmedabad in 1947 as a precursor to the ISRO.

“Sarabhai chose space technology to reduce inequality. Under his guidance and leadership, India has been able to achieve what he had envisioned,” Sivan said.

The space agency will mark Sarabhai’s birth centenary in 2019 and celebrate the event through the year with space-related activities.

“To mark the centenary, knowledge centres will be set up across the country and scholarships, fellowships and the Sarabhai international award for innovation in space technology will be presented,” said Sivan.

Chandrayan 2
Chandrayan Was India’s First Mission to Moon. Flickr Commons

The unveiling of his statue (bust) is a curtain raiser to his birth centenary.

The proposal to name Chandrayaan-2 lander as “Vikram” was approved by the Department of Space.

“As the true tribute we can offer Sarabhai is through our space missions, we will launch nine missions over the next five months, with at least two a month,” asserted Sivan.

Also Read: SpaceX Launches Communications Satellite

Sarabahi was awarded (posthumously) the Padma Vibhushan in 1972, Padma Bhushan in 1966 and Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar medal in 1962. (IANS)

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Another Space Telescope Shuts Down: NASA

Launched by space shuttles in the 1990s, Hubble and Chandra are part of NASA's Great Observatories series.

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NASA's Chandra Observatory back in action. Pixabay

Another NASA space telescope has shut down and halted science observations.

Less than a week after the Hubble Space Telescope went offline, the Chandra X-ray Observatory did the same thing. NASA said Friday that Chandra automatically went into so-called safe mode Wednesday, possibly because of a gyroscope problem.

Hubble went into hibernation last Friday because of a gyroscope failure.

NASA
This illustration made available by NASA shows the Chandra X-ray Observatory. On Oct. 12, 2018, the space agency said that the telescope automatically went into so-called safe mode on Oct. 10, possibly because of a gyroscope problem. VOA

Both orbiting observatories are old and in well-extended missions: Hubble is 28, while Chandra is 19. Flight controllers are working to resume operations with both.

NASA said it’s coincidental both went “asleep” within a week of one another. An astronomer who works on Chandra, Jonathan McDowell of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, tweeted Friday that “Chandra decided that if Hubble could have a little vacation, it wanted one, too.”

Also Read: Astronomers Capture 15,000 Galaxies Using Hubble Telescope

Launched by space shuttles in the 1990s, Hubble and Chandra are part of NASA’s Great Observatories series. The others are the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, which was also launched in the 1990s but eventually failed and was destroyed, and the Spitzer Space Telescope, launched in 2003 and still working. Each was intended to observe the cosmos in different wavelengths. (VOA)

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