Monday May 27, 2019
Home Lead Story 61% IT Profes...

61% IT Professionals Report Data Breaches: McAfee

In Asia-Pacific countries, intellectual property theft is of greater concern than personally identifiable information, the study said

0
//
McAfee
Sensitive data in Cloud more exposed than organisations think: McAfee. IANS

IT security professionals are struggling to secure their organisations and protect them against breaches with 61 per cent claiming to have experienced a data breach at their current employer, says a new report from global cyber security firm McAfee.

Data is now being stolen by several methods, with no single technique dominating the industry.

The top vectors used to appropriate data are database leaks, Cloud applications and removable USB drives, said the report titled “Grand Theft Data II — The Drivers and Shifting State of Data Breaches”.

Data breaches are becoming more serious as cyber criminals continue to target intellectual property, putting the reputation of company brand at risk and increasing financial liability, the results showed.

“Threats have evolved and will continue to become more sophisticated,” Candace Worley, Vice-President and Chief Technical Strategist at McAfee, said in a statement.

Logo of McAfee
Logo of McAfee. Flickr

“Organisations need to augment security measures by implementing a culture of security and emphasising that all employees are part of an organisation’s security posture, not just the IT team,” Worley said.

For the study, data was collected via online interviews of IT professional in several countries, including India, between 12 and December 31, 2018. To qualify for the survey, organisations had to have more than 1,000 employees.

Also Read- Amazon India Witness 56% Growth in E-commerce Exporters

According to results, personally identifiable information is of greater concern in Europe, most likely due to enforcement of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

In Asia-Pacific countries, intellectual property theft is of greater concern than personally identifiable information, the study said. (IANS)

Next Story

WhatsApp Breach Has Huge Privacy Implications, Say Experts

The spyware developed by the NSO Group had the capability to attack both Android and iOS devices

0
whatsapp business app
FILE - The WhatsApp app logo is seen on a smartphone in this picture illustration. VOA

The victims of the latest WhatsApp spyware attack may have lost important personal information including location data and email content, say experts.

A bug in the Facebook-owned messaging app’s audio call feature allowed hackers to install spyware onto Android and iOS phones just by calling the target.

The spyware was reportedly developed by the Israeli cyber intelligence company NSO Group.

“The bug can be exploited based on a decades-old type of vulnerability – a buffer overflow,” Carl Leonard, Principle Security Analyst at cybersecurity company Forcepoint, said in a statement on Wednesday.

“While no details of the actions taken by this malware have emerged, one could assume that an attacker may seek out bulk contact lists, email data, location data or other personal information,” Leonard said.

WhatsApp has not yet shared much details on the nature of the attack and its implications, but it said it had provided information to the US law enforcement to help them conduct an investigation.

“We are early in our investigation and we don’t have numbers to share though this is a relatively small amount of people,” said WhatsApp, while urging its 1.5 billion users to update the app.

The company did not immediately share how the attack impacted users in India.

“Unbeknownst to the victims, the attackers obtained complete access to everything on the their mobile devices: personal and corporate information, email, contacts, camera, microphone, and the individual’s location,” Brian Gleeson, Mobile Product Marketing Manager at Check Point Software Technologies Ltd. wrote in a blog post on Tuesday.

WhatsApp, however, said that earlier this month, it identified and “promptly” fixed the vulnerability that could enable an attacker to insert and execute code on mobile devices.

WhatsApp
WhatsApp on a smartphone device.

The spyware developed by the NSO Group had the capability to attack both Android and iOS devices.

In fact, according to a report in the Financial Times, the secretive Israeli company called in its sales people last month to talk about its software that can even breach the privacy of iPhone users.

The executives from the NSO Group made a claim that it had figured out a way to “drop its payload”, a piece of software called Pegasus that can penetrate the darkest secrets of any iPhone, using just one simple missed call on WhatsApp, said the report citing one unnamed person at the meeting.

The phone starts revealing its encrypted content shortly after the missed call.

“It then transmits back the most intimate details such as private messages or location, and even turns on the camera and microphone to live-stream meetings,” said the report.

Also Read- Apple Starts Rolling out its TV App in Over 100 Countries

While the software itself is not new, the WhatsApp hack was an enticing new “attack vector”, the person was quoted as saying.

“The WhatsApp hack illustrates that despite their best efforts, Apple and Google cannot completely secure the users of mobile devices running their operating systems,” Gleeson of Check Point said.

“In order to ensure users are properly protected, a mobile threat defence solution must be in place that can prevent spyware from gathering intelligence on their targets,” he added. (IANS)