Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×



By NewsGram Staff Writer

Keeping in mind a recent attack during a Prophet Mohammed Cartoon contest held in Texas, the FBI director James Comey has said that Islamic State is leveraging social media to recruit people in the US.

“Hundreds, maybe thousands” of people across the country are receiving recruitment overtures from the terrorist group or directives to attack the US, he told reporters on Thursday, according to USA Today.

At a time when US is surrounded with problems like racism, the Islamic State took the opportunity to recruit a large number of youth from the badly affected states of Texas, Mississippi, Buffalo and other areas. “It’s like the devil sitting on their shoulders, saying ‘kill, kill, kill,’” Comey said while talking about a recent attack at Garland in Texas.

Comey said that Texas case is symbolic to counterterrorism and we are repeatedly trying to find the operative unit of IS in America. IS recruiters operating from safe havens in Syria are making initial contacts with recruits, mostly on Twitter, and are then “steering” them into encrypted venues where their subsequent communications are “lost to us,” he said.

“The haystack is the entire country,” Comey was quoted as saying. “We are looking for the needles, but increasingly the needles are unavailable to us. This is the ‘going dark’ problem in living color. There is Elton Simpsons out there that I have not found and I cannot see,” he added.

The FBI is investigating around the country with a focus on every violent organization with inquiries open in all 56 of the FBI’s field divisions, he said. “ISIS is a very popular fad among a lot of disturbed people,” he concluded.


Popular

Unsplash

Digital becomes more popular and companies expand their D2C (direct-to-consumer) connections

Smartphone companies which have strong consumer pull now face most of the reputation issues caused by infringement of their brands in the digital space, according to a new report.

There are three main techniques pertaining to brand infringement —fake gratification, fake presence and fake representation.

According to Faisal Kawoosa, founder and chief analyst, Techarc, as digital becomes mainstream and brands increase their D2C (direct-to-consumer) engagements, they need to proactively police the digital space to hunt for any infringement cases.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter to stay updated about the World news.

"The first thing brands need to do is to come out of denial mode and create a common synergy between marketing, ecommerce, IT and digital teams," he said in the Brand Reputation Index (BRIX) report.

In fake gratification, scammers infringe any brand's identity by offering fake coupons, rewards, schemes, and discounts. This is the easiest trap for consumers who are searching for best deals when they decide about buying a smartphone of their interest.

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

Tesla new FSD Beta update

Elon Musk-owned Tesla has started to push a new Full Self-Driving (FSD) Beta software update -- version 10.6 -- to its fleet with improved object detection.

According to the auto-tech website Electrek, the company is starting to push a new version of the FSD Beta to owners in the US with a safety score of 98 and up.

Follow NewsGram on LinkedIn to know what's happening around the world.

The company said that the new update brings improved object detection network architecture for non-VRUs (e.g. cars, trucks, buses), seven per cent higher recall, 16 per cent lower depth error and 21 per cent lower velocity error for crossing vehicles.

It also brings a new visibility network with 18.5 per cent less mean relative error, the report said.

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

The researchers exposed saliva samples from Covid-19 patients to the ACE2 gum and found that levels of viral RNA fell so dramatically to be almost undetectable.

A chewing gum laced with a plant-grown protein serves as a "trap" for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, reducing viral load in saliva and potentially tamping down transmission, finds a new study.

The researchers exposed saliva samples from Covid-19 patients to the ACE2 gum and found that levels of viral RNA fell so dramatically to be almost undetectable, indicates the study published in the journal Molecular Therapy.

Follow NewsGram on Instagram to keep yourself updated.

"SARS-CoV-2 replicates in the salivary glands, and we know that when someone d sneezes, coughs, or speaks some of that virus can be expelled and reach others," said researcher Henry Daniell from the University of Pennsylvania in the US.

"This gum offers an opportunity to neutralise the virus in the saliva, giving us a simple way to possibly cut down on a source of disease transmission," Daniell added.

To test the chewing gum, the team grew angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in plants, paired with another compound that enables the protein to cross mucosal barriers and facilitates binding, and incorporated the resulting plant material into cinnamon-flavoured gum tablets.

Keep reading... Show less