Tuesday January 21, 2020

Does IVF Raise Risk of Cancer in Children? Find it out Here

“There are also lifestyle and other factors that could contribute to cancers in this group, which are not explored in the paper,” Stewart said

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IVF
IVF treatments are always supported by other associated treatments which aid in the entire treatment. Pixabay

While pregnancies enabled by in vitro fertilisation (IVF) have faced more difficulties, with children born earlier and smaller, according to a new study, they may also raise the risk of cancer in babies.

IVF is associated with birth defects and imprinting disorders. Because these conditions are associated with an increased risk of childhood cancer, many of which originate in utero, descriptions of cancers among children conceived via IVF are imperative, said researchers from the University of Minnesota in the US.

The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics journal, found that the overall cancer rate among IVF children was about 17 per cent higher than non-IVF children.

In addition, the rate of liver tumours was over 2.5 times higher among IVF children than naturally conceived children.

However, there was no difference in the rates of other cancers between the two groups.

“The most important takeaway from our research is that most childhood cancers are not more frequent in children conceived by IVF,” said Logan Spector, Professor at the University of Minnesota in the US.

Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

“There may be an increased risk of one class of cancers in children. However, due to the nature of our study, we could not distinguish between IVF itself versus the parents’ underlying infertility,” he said.

The study consisted of 275,686 IVF children and 2,266,847 naturally conceived children.

While the study found a link between IVF and childhood cancer, it’s important to note that this does not suggest IVF causes cancer, the Mirror.co.uk reported.

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“An association between IVF and cancer is found but it is impossible to say what the cause is,” Jane Stewart, Chair of the British Fertility Society, was quoted as saying.

“We still need to know whether it is the treatment itself or underlying infertility that accounts for this difference.

“There are also lifestyle and other factors that could contribute to cancers in this group, which are not explored in the paper,” Stewart said. (IANS)

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71% Parents Feel That Video Games May Have Positive Impact on Kids

71% parents believe video games good for teens

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Video Games
86 per cent of parents agree that teeagers spend too much time on video games. Pixabay

Seventy-one per cent of parents believe that video games may have a positive and healthy impact on their kids’ lifestyle, while 44 per cent try to restrict video game content, says a new study.

According to the CS Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health in US, 86 per cent of parents agree that teeagersspend too much time gaming. Parents also reported very different gaming patterns for teenage boys than girls.

Twice as many parents said that their teen boy plays video games every day compared to parents of teen girls. Teen boys are also more likely to spend three or more hours gaming.

“Although many parents believe video games can be good for teens, they also report a number of negative impacts of prolonged gaming,” said poll co-director Gary Freed from University of Michigan.

Video Games
Parents can play an important role by setting clear rules about appropriate content and how much time is too much time spent on video games. Pixabay

“Parents should take a close look at their teen’s gaming behaviour and set reasonable limits to reduce harmful impacts on sleep, family and peer relationships and school performance,” Freed added.

Overall, parents surveyed said that gaming often gets in the way of other aspects of their teen’s life, such as family activities and interactions (46 per cent), sleep (44 per cent), homework (34 per cent), friendship with non-gaming peers (33 per cent) and extracurricular activities (31 per cent).

Parents of teens ages 13-15 (compared to those with older teens) are more likely to use rating systems to try to make sure games are appropriate (43 per cent versus 18 per cent), encourage their teen to play with friends in person rather than online and to ban gaming in their teen’s bedroom.

Parents polled also use different strategies to limit the amount of time their teen spends gaming, including encouraging other activities (75 per cent), setting time limits (54 per cent), providing incentives to limit gaming (23 per cent) and hiding gaming equipment (14 percent).

The researchers noted that while gaming may be a fun activity in moderation, some teens -such as those with attention issues — are especially susceptible to the constant positive feedback and the stimulus of video games.

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This may lead to prolonged play that is disruptive to other elements of a teen’s life, the researchers added.

“Parents can play an important role by setting clear rules about appropriate content and how much time is too much time spent on video games,” Freed said. (IANS)