Tuesday February 19, 2019
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IWC Shuts Down A Proposal To Create A Sanctuary For South Atlantic Whales

The issue has fractured the IWC for decades and there appears to be no room for compromise on either side.

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An effort to create a safe haven for whales in the South Atlantic was defeated Tuesday at the meeting of the (IWC) in Brazil.

The proposal, which was introduced by Brazil in 2001, received support from 39 countries but was opposed by 25, denying it the three-quarters’ majority it needed to pass.

Environmental organizations and conservationists had argued that the sanctuary would not only keep the mammoth mammals safe from hunting, but also protect them from getting entangled in fishing gear or being struck by ships.

But pro-whaling nations, led by Japan, argued there was no need for the sanctuary because no countries were conducting commercial whale hunting in the South Atlantic.

IWC
The South Atlantic Whale. Pixabay

Brazilian Environmental Minister Edson Duarte vowed to push to get the proposal passed at future meetings of the IWC.

“We will work in other meetings of this commission this year to ensure that the sanctuary will finally be created,” Duarte said.

Pro-whaling nations, including Japan, Iceland and Norway, are pushing for resumption of sustainable hunting of whales and are unlikely to allow for the creation of a sanctuary unless their demand is met.

IWC
The proposal, which was introduced by Brazil in 2001, received support from 39 countries but was opposed by 25.

 

Japan, which has pushed for an amendment to the ban for years, accuses the IWC of siding with anti-whaling nations rather than trying to reach a compromise between conservationists and whalers.

 

Also Read: Asia’s Increase In Consumption of Meat to Cause Environmental Problems: Researchers

The issue has fractured the IWC for decades and there appears to be no room for compromise on either side.

The conference ends Sept. 14. (VOA)

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Researchers Develop Wearable Device to Measure Wearer’s Physiological Response to Environment

The team says the aim of Project Coolbit is to create a personalised comfort model for each wearer, as well as crowdsourcing environmental data in the city in real-time.

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Fitbit watches, Sensors, Environment
Fitbit watches have sensors that get information from air temperature and humidity, but also from the physiological response of the individual in that environment. Pixabay

Researchers are developing a wearable device that aims to provide individualised information while gathering environmental data.

According to researchers, the device can measure the wearer’s physiological response to their immediate environment.

“We have added some sensors to the Fitbit watches that get information from air temperature and humidity, but also from the physiological response of the individual in that environment, such as your heart rate, your skin temperature, and your skin humidity,” said Negin Nazarian from UNSW.

“We have also developed some apps where you can interact with and tell us how you feel about the environment, so that way we can develop a methodology and a solution that is personalised and not one-size-fits-all,” Nazarian added.

Fitbit watches, Environment
There are some apps where you can interact with and tell us how you feel about the environment. Pixabay

The team says the aim of Project Coolbit is to create a personalised comfort model for each wearer, as well as crowdsourcing environmental data in the city in real-time.

“So your wearable already knows your personal comfort model, it knows your preference of the environment, the type of activities you like and some information about your physiological response,” the team said.

ALSO READ: Scientists Find Solution to Reduce Air Pollution, Develop Smart Windows

A Coolbit user could create a personalised heat safe route for a run, based on the previous information received by the wearable, according to the researcher.

“It also knows, based on the environmental information that other parties may give about the cities, the climate of the city,” the researchers said. (IANS)