Tuesday March 26, 2019
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Jan Lokpal Bill tabled in Delhi assembly amid protests

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New Delhi: Amid protests by Swaraj Abhiyan leaders Prashant Bhushan and Yogendra Yadav, the Delhi government on Monday tabled the anti-corruption legislation, the Delhi Jan Lokpal Bill, in the assembly.

Tabling it, Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia said it was a “historic” bill and no such bill was as effective as this one.

There was thumping of desks by members of the ruling Aam Aadmi Party who also raised slogans in its support. The Bharatiya Janata Party members in the assembly were not present.

According to the bill, a person involved in corruption will face life imprisonment and the fine imposed will be five times the loss caused to the public exchequer.

Meanwhile, hours before AAP’s 2015 Jan Lokpal bill was tabled in Delhi Assembly, Opposition BJP’s two MLAs were evicted out of the House and Bhushan and Yadav detained by police allegedly on the orders of the Speaker.

Vijender Gupta, the BJP MLA who was evicted from the House, alleged that he was beaten up by the Marshals and abused by the AAP MLAs while protesting against the suspension of the party MLA OP Sharma.

“I was attacked in the Assembly by the Marshals over the orders of the Speaker. The AAP MLAs also hurled abuses at me,” Gupta told a news channel.

Having termed ruling AAP’s 2015 ombudsman bill “mahajokepal”, the Swaraj Abhiyan on Sunday challenged Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal to a public debate on the Jan Lokpal Bill.

“Swaraj Abhiyan challenges the Delhi chief minister for an open debate with Prashant Bhushan on their Jan Lokpal Bill,” Swaraj Abhiyan, founded by former Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) leaders Prashant Bhushan and Yogendra Yadav, said in a statement.

“We hope that Arvind Kejriwal stops misguiding the common people through lies and false propaganda and accepts the challenge for a healthy debate in the interest of transparency and common people of Delhi,” it added.

(With inputs from agencies)

Next Story

The United States Of America Drops Out Of Top 20 Corrupt Countries

For the 2018 index, 180 countries were surveyed. Denmark and New Zealand topped the list while Somalia, Syria, and South Sudan were at the bottom.

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USA, Corruption
U.S. President Donald Trump is seen through his transparent teleprompter as he speaks during the Missile Defense Review announcement at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., January 17, 2019. VOA

A global anti-corruption watchdog says the United States has dropped four spots in its list of nations’ anti-corruption efforts and is now no longer listed in the top 20 for the first time.

Acting U.S. Representative at Transparency International, Zoe Reiter, calls a four point drop in the 2018 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) a “red flag.”

She says it comes at a time when the U.S. is experiencing “threats to its system of checks and balances” and an “erosion of ethical norms at the highest levels of power.”

USA. government
Caravans from Central America have inflamed the debate over U.S. immigration policy, with U.S. President Donald Trump using the migrants to try to secure backing for his plan to build a border wall on the frontier with Mexico., VOA

“If this trend continues, it would indicate a serious corruption problem in a country that has taken a lead on the issue globally,” Reiter says.

The United States scored a 71 in the perceptions index after scoring 75 the previous year.

“The expert opinion captured by the CPI supports the deep concern over corruption in government reported by America in our 2017 survey. Both experts and the public believe the situation is getting worse,” Reiter said.

Anti-Corruption
Bulgarian anti-corruption protesters march during a demonstration in downtown Sofia, VOA

Transparency International uses several criteria for measuring how well a country is fighting corruption, including checks and balances on political power, controls on conflicts of interest and private influence on government, and voter suppression.

Also Read: World’s Anti-Corruption Day

For the 2018 index, 180 countries were surveyed. Denmark and New Zealand topped the list while Somalia, Syria, and South Sudan were at the bottom. (VOA)