Monday May 27, 2019
Home Lead Story Japan Starts ...

Japan Starts Testing the World’s Fastest Bullet Train

The flurry of new models coincides with Japan's preparations to host the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo

0
//
Bullet train project will generate around 15 lakh new jobs. Wikimedia Commons
Bullet train project will generate around 15 lakh new jobs. Wikimedia Commons

Japan has started testing its fastest-ever bullet train — capable of reaching 400 kilometers per hour (249 mph) — as it continues to develop the revolutionary mode of travel.

The ALFA-X version of the Shinkansen train began three years’ worth of test runs on Friday, the CNN reported.

Once it enters operation sometime around 2030, it will run at speeds of up to 360 kph (224 mph), comfortably making it the world’s fastest bullet train.

It will also outpace China’s Fuxing train, which runs at 10 kph slower despite being designed with the same top speed capabilities as the ALFA-X.

The model’s futuristic design features 10 cars and a long pointed nose.

It’ll be tested on the line between the cities of Sendai and Aomori, which are about 280 kilometers apart as the crow flies. Tests will take place after midnight, when the line is quiet, and will occur twice a week.

Bullet Train
Railway Board Chairman held a high-level meeting in Rail Bhavan last Thursday which was attended by Japanese Ambassador Kenji Hiramatsu, and Niti Aayog Vice Chairman. (Representational image). Wikimedia

The ALFA-X marks a new stage of growth for the Shinkansen, pushing the world-renowned high speed rail service even faster towards the future.

Its testing debut comes as Japan’s new high-speed Shinkansen N700S continues tests that began just over a year ago.

Also Read- Account Information Requests Jump From India: Twitter

That model will enter operation in 2020, but its maximum speeds of 300 kph — the same as other N700 series trains — will be easily surpassed by the ALFA-X.

The flurry of new models coincides with Japan’s preparations to host the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

No matter what speeds the train achieves during its test runs, it won’t match the record-breaking pace of Japan Railway’s magnetic levitation, or maglev, train which hit 603 kph (374 mph) on an experimental track in 2015. (IANS)

Next Story

Fukushima’s Nuclear Power Plant: Japan Begins Removing Fuel

The three units at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant melted down after a major earthquake, followed by a tsunami struck Japan in 2011, killing about 18 thousand people and forced the evacuation of areas near the plant.

0
Japan
Tour guide Katsuaki Shiga, right, and a tourist check radiation levels at Joroku Park, near Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, May 17, 2018. VOA

The operator of Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power plant began removing fuel rods Monday from one of three reactors that melted down in 2011.

The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) said workers started removing the first of the used and unused fuel units from a cooling pool at reactor 3.

tide
The three units at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant melted down after a major earthquake, followed by a tsunami struck Japan in 2011, killing about 18 thousand people and forced the evacuation of areas near the plant. Pixabay

The operation was was more than four years behind schedule, and had a short further delay Monday afternoon, after a problem with the equipment, but resumed after the mishap was addressed.

TEPCO has estimated that it will take up to two years to remove 566 of nuclear fuel rods from that reactor.

 

map
After the cleaning operation at Unit 3, TEPCO expects to continue with the removal of 1000 nuclear fuel rods from the storage pools of reactors one and two. VOA

 

The work is being managed remotely from a control room about 500 meters away, because of high radiation level still present inside the building of Unit 3.

After the cleaning operation at Unit 3, TEPCO expects to continue with the removal of 1000 nuclear fuel rods from the storage pools of reactors one and two.

Also Read: Women Representation in Lok Sabha as Low as 12 Percent

The three units at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant melted down after a major earthquake, followed by a tsunami struck Japan in 2011, killing about 18 thousand people and forced the evacuation of areas near the plant. (VOA)