Wednesday December 19, 2018

Japanese Minimalist Movement: Why Less is More?

The Japanese minimalist movement promotes ideas of simplicity and to keep just what you need

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Japanese house
Japanese style house. Source: Pixabay
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  • Zen Buddhism is promoting simplistic way of life
  • Japanese people are being promoted to only keep just what they need
  • People are focussing on more important things in life rather than keeping up with the trends

New Delhi, July 8, 2017: A new trend, which has become prominent in Japan is called minimalist movement. it promotes stress-free simplicity and has become popular under the influence of Zen Buddhism. It supports simplicity and ideas like less is more. A de-cluttering expert Marie Condo influences people to throw everything out and retain just what you are just in need of. There are thousands of people who are hardcore minimalists with almost thousands more interested.

Japan is regularly hit by natural disasters like an earthquake which does not make it sensible to fill their homes with a lot of valued possessions. Studies reveal that falling objects cause nearly half of earthquake injuries. Moreover, it is cheaper to be minimalist.

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Some of the bedrooms in Japan are so simple that they do not have beds. All consumerist products are kept out of sight in drawers. Everything is kept right where it was picked up from after use. In some houses, even the living rooms have been de-cluttered and are filled with only a desk and chair. They manage to decorate their houses with simple yet beautiful objects. It is easier to find items you need and they are kept within reach. A popular storage strategy used by minimalists is hanging objects on hooks.

Fumio Sasaki is one of the many Japanese people who decided that less is more and lives in a minimalist way. His friends compare his one room apartment to an interrogation room. He, who was once a collector of books, CDs, and DVDs, got tired of following trends and starting selling his belongings or giving them to his friends.

According to him, if he spends less time on cleaning and gathering trendy things he would be able to focus on the more important things in life like friends and traveling and it’ll make him a lot more active. Definitions of minimalists vary because the aim is not just de-cluttering but re-considering what possessions mean to them in order to gain something else.

In the West, an empty space is made complete by filling it with different things but here, in Japan, spaces are left empty to let people’s imaginations make them complete. It is a way of valuing the more important things in your life and discarding the less important ones.

– prepared by Harsimran Kaur of NewsGram. Twitter: Hkaur1025

 

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Narendra Modi Concludes Japan-US-India Partnership Successful

He said that the three leaders felt that such meetings were useful and they should continue on the margins of subsequent G-20 meetings

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According to LocalCircles, each person who voted in the survey is registered with the portal with their detailed information and in many cases they shared their residential address.
Congress helping those who want to weaken Army: Modi, wikimedia commons

Terming the India-US-Japan partnership as “Jai” (literal: victory), Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Friday said the partnership between the three nations would go a long way in ensuring world peace and prosperity.

“If I put it differently, Japan, America and India is Jai. In Hindi, ‘Jai’ means success,” Narendra Modi said after the first-ever trilateral meet with US President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on the sidelines of the G-20 summit here.

“In a way, Jai (the trilateral meet) is a message of success and we are making a new beginning. Our arrangement I believe, will play a big role in promoting world peace and prosperity,” Modi said.

Narendra Modi said it was a “good occasion” as the three nations dedicated to democratic values met to discuss how to promote peace, prosperity and stability in the world.

“I am glad both US and Japan are our strategic partners. Both the leaders (Turmp and Abe) have been my good friends. It is a good opportunity to work together.

Briefing the media about the meeting Foreign Secretary Vijay Gokhale said that it was a “very warm meeting” and Trump and Abe complimented Prime Minister Modi for the “reforms and development that he has done”.

Donald Trump, democrats, government
U.S. President Donald Trump. VOA

“The three leaders exchanged views on the Indo-Pacific. They all agreed that free, open, inclusive and rules-based order is essential for the regional peace and prosperity. The Prime Minister offered some ideas on how we should take forward on the concept of Indo-Pacific and how the three countries can work together to promote this concept,” Gokhale said.

He said that Modi felt it was necessary that the three countries reach out to all the stakeholders to explain the benefits of Indo-Pacific strategy and their advantages to these countries.

“The leaders also agreed to the central role of Asean and they also agreed to work on maritime and connectivity issues and to synergise efforts in this regard,” Gokhale said.

He said that the three leaders felt that such meetings were useful and they should continue on the margins of subsequent G-20 meetings.

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“Overall, there was a very positive atmosphere and the outcome of this first trilateral has been very encouraging. Prime Minister Modi and the other two leaders were pleased with this outcome,” Gokhale added.

Earlier, making an intervention at the first session of the G-20 meet on global economy, future of work and women’s empowerment, Modi highlighted some of the flagship programmes of his government undertaken to modernise economy and promote inclusive growth, such as Jan Dhan Yojana, MUDRA Yojana and Start-up India. (IANS)