Tuesday March 26, 2019

Japanese Minimalist Movement: Why Less is More?

The Japanese minimalist movement promotes ideas of simplicity and to keep just what you need

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Japanese house
Japanese style house. Source: Pixabay
  • Zen Buddhism is promoting simplistic way of life
  • Japanese people are being promoted to only keep just what they need
  • People are focussing on more important things in life rather than keeping up with the trends

New Delhi, July 8, 2017: A new trend, which has become prominent in Japan is called minimalist movement. it promotes stress-free simplicity and has become popular under the influence of Zen Buddhism. It supports simplicity and ideas like less is more. A de-cluttering expert Marie Condo influences people to throw everything out and retain just what you are just in need of. There are thousands of people who are hardcore minimalists with almost thousands more interested.

Japan is regularly hit by natural disasters like an earthquake which does not make it sensible to fill their homes with a lot of valued possessions. Studies reveal that falling objects cause nearly half of earthquake injuries. Moreover, it is cheaper to be minimalist.

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Some of the bedrooms in Japan are so simple that they do not have beds. All consumerist products are kept out of sight in drawers. Everything is kept right where it was picked up from after use. In some houses, even the living rooms have been de-cluttered and are filled with only a desk and chair. They manage to decorate their houses with simple yet beautiful objects. It is easier to find items you need and they are kept within reach. A popular storage strategy used by minimalists is hanging objects on hooks.

Fumio Sasaki is one of the many Japanese people who decided that less is more and lives in a minimalist way. His friends compare his one room apartment to an interrogation room. He, who was once a collector of books, CDs, and DVDs, got tired of following trends and starting selling his belongings or giving them to his friends.

According to him, if he spends less time on cleaning and gathering trendy things he would be able to focus on the more important things in life like friends and traveling and it’ll make him a lot more active. Definitions of minimalists vary because the aim is not just de-cluttering but re-considering what possessions mean to them in order to gain something else.

In the West, an empty space is made complete by filling it with different things but here, in Japan, spaces are left empty to let people’s imaginations make them complete. It is a way of valuing the more important things in your life and discarding the less important ones.

– prepared by Harsimran Kaur of NewsGram. Twitter: Hkaur1025

 

Next Story

Japan to Drop Explosive to Make Crater on Asteroid to Collect Samples from Inside

Hayabusa2 made history on Feb. 22 when it successfully touched down on the boulder-rich asteroid, where it also collected some surface fragments

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FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2019, file photo, this image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows the shadow, center above, of the Hayabusa2 spacecraft after its successful touchdown on the asteroid Ryugu. VOA

Japan’s space agency said Monday that its Hayabusa2 spacecraft will follow up last month’s touchdown on a distant asteroid with another risky mission — to drop an explosive to make a crater and collect underground samples to get possible clues to the origin of the solar system.

Hayabusa2 made history on Feb. 22 when it successfully touched down on the boulder-rich asteroid, where it also collected some surface fragments.

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency said Hayabusa2 is to drop a copper impactor the size of a baseball and weighing 2 kilograms (4.4 pounds) on the asteroid on April 5 to collect samples from deeper underground where they had not been exposed to the sun or space rays.

The new mission will require an immediate evacuation of the spacecraft to the other side of the asteroid so it won’t get hit by flying shards from the blast, JAXA said. While moving away, Hayabusa2 will leave a camera to capture the outcome.

Japan
JAXA has previously planned to have Hayabusa2 briefly touchdown in a crater, but an agency researcher, Takashi Kubota, said they may not force it to prioritize safety for the spacecraft. VOA

The mission will allow JAXA scientists to analyze details of a crater to find out the history of the asteroid, said Koji Wada, who is in charge of the project.

Hayabusa2 will start descending toward the asteroid the day before to carry out the mission from its home position of 20 kilometers (12 miles) above. It will drop a cone-shaped piece of equipment containing explosives that will blast off a copper plate on the bottom. It will turn into a ball and slam into the asteroid at the speed of 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) per second.

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JAXA has previously planned to have Hayabusa2 briefly touchdown in a crater, but an agency researcher, Takashi Kubota, said they may not force it to prioritize safety for the spacecraft. Kubota said it would be the first time a spacecraft would take materials from underground a space object.

The asteroid, named Ryugu after an undersea palace in a Japanese folktale, is about 900 meters (3,000 feet) in diameter and about 300 million kilometers (180 million miles) from Earth. (VOA)