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Jawahar Bagh incident prime accused Ram Vriksh Yadav may be alive as DNA doesn’t Match with his son’s

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Ram Vraksh Yadav, Twitter
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Lucknow, April 17, 2017: In a surprise twist to the infamous Jawaharbagh incident, in which over two dozen people, including two senior police officers were killed in Mathura last year, a forensic lab report says that the DNA of prime accused Ram Vriksh Yadav, reportedly found dead, does not match with his son’s.

The Central Forensic Science Laboratory (CFSL), Hyderabad, in its report has inferred that the DNA picked from the corpse supposedly of Ram Vriksh does not match with his son’s DNA.

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A Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader Ashwani Upadhyaya had petitioned the Allahabad High Court, seeking a DNA test on the body of Ram Vriksh to ascertain whether the allegedly dead person was him or not.

Following this, the High Court had ordered a DNA verification by the CFSL, report of which was submitted before the court on Monday.

Yadav and his men had encroached upon a multi-acre park in the centre of Mathura and when on orders of a court, police went to clear them out in June last year, the police team was fired upon in which SP (City) Mukul Dwivedi and SO Santosh Kumar Yadav were killed.

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Later, as many as 24 persons, including many encroachers, were also killed in the violence that followed.

The incident had made international headlines for the scale of violence and the fact that senior police officials were also killed.

After the DNA report, police now suspect that Ram Vriksh might be alive and hiding, and the body considered as his was of somebody else. (IANS)

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Novel Synthetic DNA Vaccines Safe To Use Against Ebola: Scientists

While there are no licensed treatments available for Ebola virus disease yet, multiple experimental therapies are being developed.

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Ebola, UNICEF. congo, DNA
A Congolese health worker administers Ebola vaccine to a woman who had contact with an Ebola sufferer in the village of Mangina in North Kivu province of the Democratic Republic of Congo

Scientists, including one of Indian-origin, have found that the novel synthetic DNA vaccine is safe against Ebola virus and offers a long-term alternative to traditional vaccines.

The team, from The Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, US, optimised a shorter, dose-sparing, immunisation regimen and simplified vaccine that can be directly administered into the skin. They targeted a virus surface protein called glycoprotein.

This new approach induced rapid and protective immunity from virus challenges.

Importantly, the approach showed strong immune responses one year after the last dose, supporting the long-term immunogenicity of the vaccine — a particularly challenging area for Ebola vaccines.

Ebola, UNICEF. congo, DNA
A boy runs past a dispenser containing water mixed with disinfectant, east of Mbandaka, DRC. VOA

“Synthetic non-viral based DNA technology allows for rapid vaccine development by delivery directly into the skin, resulting in consistent, potent and rapid immunity compared to traditional vaccine approaches,” said lead researcher David B. Weiner, Director of Wistar’s Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center.

“An anti-Ebola virus DNA vaccine like this may provide an important new tool for protection, and we are excited to see what future studies will unveil,” he added.

In the study, published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, the team detected antibody levels were equal or higher to those reported for other vaccines currently being evaluated in the clinic.

“The success of intradermal delivery of a low-dose regimen is very encouraging,” said Ami Patel, Ph.D., associate staff scientist in the Weiner Lab. “The ultimate goal of our work is to create effective and safe vaccines that are optimised for field use in at-risk areas.”

Ebola, UNICEF. congo, DNA
Photo taken Sept 9, 2018, shows health workers walking with a boy suspected of having the Ebola virus at an Ebola treatment centre in Beni, Eastern Congo. VOA

Ebola virus disease is a serious and often fatal illness that can cause fever, headache, muscle pain, weakness, fatigue, diarrhoea, vomiting, stomach pain and haemorrhage (severe bleeding).

First discovered in humans in 1976 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the largest outbreak occurred in West Africa from 2014 to 2016, which claimed more than 11,000 lives, according to the World Health Organization.

Also Read: Ebola Increases The Number of Orphans in DRC: UNICEF

The death rate is about 50 per cent and the virus is spread by contact with contaminated body fluids, including blood and semen.

While there are no licensed treatments available for Ebola virus disease yet, multiple experimental therapies are being developed. (IANS)