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Jawahar Bagh incident prime accused Ram Vriksh Yadav may be alive as DNA doesn’t Match with his son’s

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Ram Vraksh Yadav, Twitter
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Lucknow, April 17, 2017: In a surprise twist to the infamous Jawaharbagh incident, in which over two dozen people, including two senior police officers were killed in Mathura last year, a forensic lab report says that the DNA of prime accused Ram Vriksh Yadav, reportedly found dead, does not match with his son’s.

The Central Forensic Science Laboratory (CFSL), Hyderabad, in its report has inferred that the DNA picked from the corpse supposedly of Ram Vriksh does not match with his son’s DNA.

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A Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader Ashwani Upadhyaya had petitioned the Allahabad High Court, seeking a DNA test on the body of Ram Vriksh to ascertain whether the allegedly dead person was him or not.

Following this, the High Court had ordered a DNA verification by the CFSL, report of which was submitted before the court on Monday.

Yadav and his men had encroached upon a multi-acre park in the centre of Mathura and when on orders of a court, police went to clear them out in June last year, the police team was fired upon in which SP (City) Mukul Dwivedi and SO Santosh Kumar Yadav were killed.

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Later, as many as 24 persons, including many encroachers, were also killed in the violence that followed.

The incident had made international headlines for the scale of violence and the fact that senior police officials were also killed.

After the DNA report, police now suspect that Ram Vriksh might be alive and hiding, and the body considered as his was of somebody else. (IANS)

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CRISPR Gene Editing can Cause Risky Collateral DNA Damage: Study

The work has implications for how CRISPR/Cas9 is used therapeutically and is likely to re-spark researchers' interest in finding alternatives to the standard CRISPR/Cas9 method for gene editing

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genes
CRISPR/Cas9 is a type of molecular scissor technology that can alter sections of DNA in cells by cutting at specific points and introducing changes at that location.. Pixabay

The much celebrated CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technique can cause greater genetic damage in cells than was previously thought, scientists have warned.

CRISPR/Cas9 is a type of molecular scissor technology that can alter sections of DNA in cells by cutting at specific points and introducing changes at that location.

Besides extensive use in scientific research, CRISPR/Cas9 has also been seen as a promising way to create potential genome editing treatments for diseases such as HIV, cancer or sickle cell disease.

But the new research, reported in the journal Nature Biotechnology, revealed that CRISPR/Cas9 frequently caused extensive mutations, though at a distance from the target site.

Many of the cells, in both mice and humans, had large genetic rearrangements such as DNA deletions and insertions.

genes
CRISPR/Cas9 frequently caused extensive mutations, though at a distance from the target site.. Pixabay

These could lead to important genes being switched on or off, which could have major implications for CRISPR/Cas9 use in therapies.

In addition, some of these changes were too far away from the target site to be seen with standard genotyping methods, the researchers said.

“This is the first systematic assessment of unexpected events resulting from CRISPR/Cas9 editing in therapeutically relevant cells, and we found that changes in the DNA have been seriously underestimated before now,” said Allan Bradley, Professor at the Wellcome Sanger Institute in London.

Also Read: New Link Found Between Alcohol, Genes And Heart Failure

“It is important that anyone thinking of using this technology for gene therapy proceeds with caution, and looks very carefully to check for possible harmful effects,” Bradley added

The work has implications for how CRISPR/Cas9 is used therapeutically and is likely to re-spark researchers’ interest in finding alternatives to the standard CRISPR/Cas9 method for gene editing.

“While it is not known if genomic sites in other cell lines will be affected in the same way, this study shows that further research and specific testing is needed before CRISPR/Cas9 is used clinically,” the researchers said. (IANS)