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Jewellery Trends For 2018

Jewellery trends go bold and asymmetrical for 2018

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Jewellery trends.
Jewellery Trends. Pixabay
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The 2018 is witnessing some new trends in jewellery and the re-imagination of some of the trends of yore. From boldness, juxtaposition of colours, asymmetrical shapes to trapped and protected gemstones, experts suggest some trends for this year.

Venkatesh S., lead designer at BlueStone.com, enlists some of the most prominent trends that one can expect in the months to come.

* Bold statement jewellery: It is the most prominent trend especially so far as earrings and choker neck pieces are concerned.

Ear Jewellery
Ear Jewellery. Pixabay

* Trapped and protected gemstones trend: Typically, gemstones are set in jewellery using traditional setting styles such as prongs. This year, the industry redefines gemstone settings in jewellery by using a halo of precious colortones and mesh to hold the gemstones within the piece. An innovation in jewellery that challenges the classics.

* Bold statement jewellery incorporating discs: Statement studs and eardrops, and choker neckpieces incorporating discs in various sizes and metals such as gold and rose gold, are likely to be the hottest interpretation of this trend, straight off the runway!

* Frills and ruffles: The hottest trend in apparel will be translated to jewellery as well. This trend does not necessarily translate to huge pieces. Subtle but powerful ruffle jewellery pieces can make as big a statement as huge pieces.

Farah Khan Ali, CEO, Creative Director, Farah Khan Fine Jewellery too have some trends to share.

* Juxtapose of colour: Fascination for colours is stronger ever. We predict an exotic style of bringing eclectic palette together with interesting silhouettes.

* Asymmetry and mis-match: The trend of asymmetry is a freedom to mix and match.

* Fluidity: Fluid forms with volume in surfaces would be dominant. Clean and contemporary shapes and silhouettes will be popular.  BollywoodCountry

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Earth Day 2018: Focusing on Ending Plastic Pollution

Earth Day 2018 focuses on Plastic pollution

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A demonstrator holds a placard as she participates in the March for Science rally on Earth Day in Mexico City, Mexico April 22, 2017. The placard reads:
FILE - A demonstrator holds a placard as she participates in the March for Science rally on Earth Day in Mexico City, Mexico April 22, 2017. The placard reads: "A country without science, research and education is a country dependent." Earth Day 2018, which is Sunday, will focus on plastics pollution. (VOA)

Each year on April 22, many people stop to think about the health of the world environment, as as if it were a New Year’s Day for nature, many make resolutions to treat the world around them more responsibly.

The day first celebrated in 1970 is approaching a half-century of existence with a movement that started in the United States and spread around the world. People celebrate the day with environmental action such as natural area cleanups, public demonstrations, tree plantings and, in 2016, the signing of the international Paris climate agreement, which aims to keep climate change in check.

The theme for 2018 is plastic pollution. Experts say a large mass of discarded plastic that has gathered in the Pacific Ocean, known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, has grown to more than 600,000 square miles — more than 155 million hectares (600,000 square miles), or twice the size of the U.S. state of Texas.

FILE - In this photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a black-footed albatross chick with plastics in its stomach lies dead on Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Nov. 2, 2014. Midway sits amid a collection of man-made debris called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Along the paths of Midway, there are piles of feathers with rings of plastic in the middle — remnants of birds that died with the plastic in their guts. Each year the agency removes about 20 tons of plastic and debris that washes ashore from surrounding waters.
FILE – In this photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a black-footed albatross chick with plastics in its stomach lies dead on Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Nov. 2, 2014. Midway sits amid a collection of man-made debris called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Along the paths of Midway, there are piles of feathers with rings of plastic in the middle — remnants of birds that died with the plastic in their guts. Each year the agency removes about 20 tons of plastic and debris that washes ashore from surrounding waters. (VOA)

The patch developed in less than 100 years, as plastics have been in common use only since the 1950s. It is one of several masses of refuse found in the world’s oceans, brought together by weather patterns and water currents. Experts say many types of plastic that do not biodegrade can remain in the environment for up to 2,000 years.

Also Read: ‘Skip The Straw’: A Call For Earth Day

This year’s Earth Day focuses on getting rid of single-use plastics, promoting the using of alternative materials, recycling and developing more responsible behaviors concerning the use of plastics.

The environmental group behind Earth Day, the Earth Day Network, estimates that 1 billion people around the world recognize Earth Day in some way.  VOA

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