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Jimmy Gait Receives Test Results, Laments About Being Misdiagnosed By Kenyan Medics

In his new update video, Gait affirmed that he doesn’t have throat cancer as was initially claimed and that he needed not to have any surgery as well

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Jimmy Gait, Test, Results
Gospel Singer Jimmy Gait.

BY GOEFFREY ISAYA

Gospel singer, Jimmy Gait has finally received his medical results which are a sigh of relief for him and his fans. Jimmy Gait

In his new update video, Gait affirmed that he doesn’t have throat cancer as was initially claimed and that he needed not to have any surgery as well.

The Muhathara singer, who traveled to India seeking treatment for a throat condition, lamented that he had actually been misdiagnosed by Kenyan doctors, who according to him, were only out for his money.

Speaking on Gait’s condition, Dr Sanjay  Khanna, who has been treating the musician noted that Gait had no throat condition as he was suffering from increased acid production which caused an infection in his stomach.

Jimmy Gait, Test, Results
Gospel singer, Jimmy Gait has finally received his medical results which are a sigh of relief for him and his fans. Pixabay

He further noted that there was no need for Gait to undergo surgery.

Dr Khanna also mentioned that Gait is responding well to the treatment and he will be released to travel back home soon after his review.

He also asked all medical practitioners to assess their patients well so that they can be treated well.

Gait stated: “I am so grateful to God that I chose to seek further medical attention otherwise I would have never been able to sing again.

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“Thank you so much for your prayers and support,” he added.

Jimmy Gait has been away from the public limelight and according to reports, has been battling the throat condition for three months now.

He left for India two weeks ago.

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FDA Gives Market Authorisation For Zika Diagnostic Test

A Zika diagnostic test developed by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis was newly granted market authorisation

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Zika, Virus, Test
Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are seen in a mosquito cage at a laboratory in Cucuta, Colombia,Feb. 11, 2016. VOA

A Zika diagnostic test developed by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis was newly granted market authorisation by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

According to a press release posted on the website of the university on Wednesday, using an antibody as well as other components to detect anti-Zika antibodies in the blood of people recently infected with the virus, the test can detect signs of Zika infection in serum samples within 12 weeks of infection, the Xinhua news agency reported.

Zika, Virus, Test
Scientists develop nanotechnology based test that detects Zika virus. Wikimedia Commons

The test is not meant to be used as a stand-alone proof of infection. The FDA recommends that the test be used only for people with symptoms of recent infection, as well as a history of living in or travelling to geographic regions where Zika circulates. Positive results should be confirmed in accordance with guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Zika virus can cause babies to be born with devastating brain damage. But the signs of Zika infection in adults: rash, fever, headache and body aches, are nonspecific, so a pregnant woman who develops such symptoms can’t be sure if she has contracted Zika or something less risky for her fetus.

“This test, along with another that detects viral genetic material at very early stages of infection, will help women and their doctors make informed health-care decisions,” said Michael S. Diamond, a co-inventor of the technology that underlies the test and a professor of molecular microbiology and of pathology and immunology at Washington University.  (IANS)