Friday February 28, 2020

People with More Job Control Less Likely to Suffer From Back Pain: Study

More autonomy at work cuts low back pain risk

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back pain
Not only physical but also psychological and social factors exert considerable influence on the development of the pain disorder. Pixabay

While physical factors such as incorrect posture or sitting for too long are generally related to chronic low back pain and this affects the person’s health and lifestyle, new research has found that employees with more job control are less likely to suffer from the disease.

The research, published in the journal BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, indicates that not only physical but also psychological and social factors exert considerable influence on the development of the pain disorder.

“People with a high workload suffered more frequently from chronic low back pain. Employees with more job control were less affected,” explained social psychologist Anne Tomaschek from Dresden University of Technology (TU Dresden) in Germany.

pain disorder work
New research has found that employees with more job control are less likely to suffer from the disease. Pixabay

It was also shown that back pain was lower when people received social support at work from their superiors and colleagues.

Worldwide, more than 23 per cent of the population suffers from chronic low back pain (CLBP).

This makes CLBP the most prevalent chronic pain disorder, associated with immense costs to the health care system.

For the study, the team of psychologists carried out a meta-analysis to identify psychosocial work factors that pose a risk for the development of chronic low back pain.

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The team synthesised more than 19,000 data sets from 18 studies investigating associations between psychosocial areas of work life and CLBP.

The researchers from TU Dresden were able to show that psychosocial areas of work life such as workload, job control and social support significantly contribute to the development of the disease, as well. (IANS)

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Air Pollution Increases Risk of Developing Kidney Diseases

India may face kidney diseases due to air pollution

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Kidney disease pollution
People living in countries with higher levels of air pollution such as India and China may face higher risks of developing kidney diseases. Pixabay

Researchers have found that people living in countries with higher levels of air pollution such as India and China may face higher risks of developing kidney diseases.

The findings may be especially important for parts of the world with higher air pollution where fine particulate matter levels are five to 10 times higher than in the US, the study said.

It’s known that breathing in air pollution can have detrimental health effects beyond the lungs, but few studies have shown how it impacts the kidneys, which act as filters for the blood.

“As rates of chronic kidney disease rise worldwide, it is important to understand whether and how exposure to air pollution plays a role,” said study researcher Matthew F. Blum from the Johns Hopkins University in the US.

Kidney disease pollution
It’s known that breathing in air pollution can have detrimental health effects beyond the lungs, but few studies have shown how it impacts the kidneys, which act as filters for the blood. Pixabay

For the findings, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, the research team examined information on 10,997 adults across four sites in the US who were followed from 1996-1998 through 2016.

The researchers estimated the monthly average levels of tiny particles of air pollution–called fine particulate matter–based on participants’ home addresses.

Fine particulate matter comes from a variety of sources including fossil fuel combustion, industrial processes, and natural sources, they said.

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The team found that exposure to higher amounts of fine particulate matter was associated with a higher degree of albuminuria — a marker of kidney dysfunction — at the start of the study as well as a higher risk of developing chronic kidney disease over time.

According to the researchers, future studies should examine whether efforts to improve air quality yield health benefits, including reducing rates of chronic kidney disease. (IANS)