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Jordon opts for retributory justice to avenge its pilot’s killing


Jordon responds to Kasaesbeh’s killing, executes two Iraqi militants
by NewsGram Staff

Image Credit: Moyan Brenn

In an attempt to send a strong message, responding to the killing of its Pilot Jordon hanged two Iraqi militants. It had vouched for an “earth shaking response” after the video broadcast of the Pilot being burnt alive by the hardliners. The pilot, Muath al-Kasaesbeh was captured when his F-16 crashed in northeastern Syria in December last year.

One of the militants hanged by Jordon was Sajida al-Rishawi, sentenced to death for a bomb attach in Amman in 2005. She was much-sought by the Islamic State for release in exchange for a Japanese hostage, journalist Kenji Goto, who was eventually beheaded as Jordon had insisted on release of the pilot as part of the deal. The other militant executed was a senior al Qaeda member, Ziyad Karboli.

Kasaesbeh was a member of a large tribe that plays a major role in the support of the Hashemite monarchy. The people of Jordon are thoroughly apprehensive of King Abdullah’s political backing toward the U.S.-led war as Kasaesbeh’s fate has become a matter of concern and raised a fear of further militant reactions. Jordon is a major ally to the U.S. against hardline Islamist groups. It has a tactical support from the U.S. at its borders to help fortify the border defences to check the jihadists’ intrusion from Syria.

The Syrian government also condemned the killing and asked Jordon to cooperate it in tackling the hardliners and al Qaeda-backed Nusrat Front. The U.S., however, has ruled out any partnership with Syria as it deems President Bashar al-Assad as part of the issues.

Meanwhile, the victim’s father came up to appeal that the two executions would not suffice and a more elaborate action was required to avenge the killing. “I want the state to get revenge for my son’s blood through more executions of those people who follow this criminal group that shares nothing with Islam. Jordanians are demanding that the state and coalition take revenge with even more painful blows to destroy these criminals.” Safi al-Kasaesbeh told the Reuters.

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US Backtracks on Iraqi, Kurd Cease-fire Claim

An Iraqi soldier removes a Kurdish flag from Altun Kupri
An Iraqi soldier removes a Kurdish flag from Altun Kupri on the outskirts of Irbil, Iraq. VOA

Iraq, October 27: The U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State announced Friday morning a cease-fire between Iraqi forces and the Kurdish Peshmerga in Northern Iraq but quickly backtracked on the claim, saying it is not an “official” cease-fire.

Army spokesman Ryan Dillon posted a clarification on Twitter to say “both parties (are) talking with one another,” but that a “cease-fire” had not been reached.

The Iraqi military and the Kurdish minority have been clashing for several weeks after the Iraqi troops moved to secure areas in northern Iraq that had been seized from IS jihadists by Kurdish forces. The Kurdish forces abandoned the land largely without resistance, though low-level clashes have been reported.

Iraqi PM rejects Kurdish offer

The areas Iraqi forces are moving into were mostly under Baghdad’s control in 2014, when Islamic State militants swept into the region. Kurdish Peshmerga and coalition forces recaptured the lands, and the Kurdistan Region has since held them.

The Iraqi leadership said it is retaking the areas to establish federal authority after a Kurdish referendum for independence in September threatened the nation’s unity. More than 92 percent of Kurds in Iraq voted “yes” in a vote Baghdad called illegal, and the international community leaders said was dangerous and ill-timed.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi on Thursday rejected an offer by Kurdish leaders to freeze the results of their independence referendum in favor of dialogue in order to avoid further conflict.

The Kurdistan Regional Government, in a statement, said the confrontations have hurt both sides and could lead to ongoing bloodshed and social unrest in Iraq.

“Certainly, continued fighting does not lead any side to victory, but it will drive the country towards disarray and chaos, affecting all aspects of life,” the KRG said.

‘Unified Iraq is the only way to go’

Abadi said in a statement his government will accept only the annulment of the referendum and respect for the constitution.

During a briefing Friday morning at the Pentagon, Joint Staff Director Lieutenant General Kenneth McKenzie Jr. told reporters the U.S. believes “a unified Iraq is the only way to go forward.”

He added, “We’re not helping anyone attack anyone else inside Iraq, either the Kurds or the Iraqis.”(VOA)

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