Tuesday November 21, 2017

Children Gorging on Junk Food? Blame Father’s Education and High Income

The research counters the argument that new-generation mothers have become lazy and so feed two-minute noodles and other junk food to children

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children and junk food
children's affinity towards junk food. Wikimedia
  • A recently published research paper questions the widely held view that mothers are to blame for kids’ junk food
  • The authors say that junk food intake decreased with mothers’ education but went up with father’s educational status and income
  • Findings of the research suggest that the junk food intake of adolescents show a decrease with the mother’s education but increase with the father’s education

Aligarh, July 26, 2017: The next time you see children gorging on junk food, don’t blame the mothers. Instead, blame the father’s education and high income.

This is the finding of Nafis Faizi, Assistant Professor in the Department of Community Medicine at the Aligarh Muslim University.

In a research paper jointly authored with Arzi Adbi, a Doctoral Student of Strategy from Singapore, and Chirantan Chatterjee, Assistant Professor, Indian School of Business, Hyderabad, the paper questions the widely held view that mothers are to blame for kids’ junk food.

ALSO READHidden Digital Ads Push Children to Eat Fatty Food, warn Health Experts

The authors say that junk food intake decreased with mothers’ education but went up with father’s educational status and income. The more wealthy and more educated fathers are, more likely they will feed children with junk food.

The research counters the argument that new-generation mothers have become lazy and so feed two-minute noodles and other junk food to children.

Faizi pointed out that paternal factors play a big role in adolescents’ health outcomes.

He added that findings of his research suggest that the junk food intake of adolescents show a decrease with the mother’s education but increase with the father’s education. (IANS)

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Children’s Commissioner for England Warns against Overuse of Social Media among Children

Last year, industry watchdog Ofcom said the internet overtook television as the most popular media pastime for children in the UK.

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Social Media
Social media use among children is on the rise. Wikimedia

August 08, 2017: Parents must intervene to stop their children over using social media and consuming time online “like junk food”, according to a top official.

In an interview on Saturday, Children’s Commissioner for England Anne Longfield slammed the ways social media giants use to draw children into spending more time.

Also Read: China’s Internet Censors Block ‘Winnie the Pooh’ Images on Social Media

She said parents should be proactive in stopping their children from bingeing on the internet in the summer holidays.

“It’s something that every parent will talk about especially during school holidays; that children are in danger of seeing social media like sweeties, and their online time like junk food,” the BBC quoted Longfield as saying in the interview.

“None of us as parents would want our children to eat junk food all the time.

“For those same reasons, we shouldn’t want our children to do the same with their online time.”

Last year, industry watchdog Ofcom said the internet overtook television as the most popular media pastime for children in the UK.

Children aged five to 15 are spending 15 hours a week on the internet, reports the BBC.

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A study earlier this year of screen time and mental well-being among teenagers suggested that moderate use of devices may be beneficial.

The research, which appeared in the journal Psychological Science, was based self-reported data from 120,000 15-year-olds in England. (IANS)

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Muslim Women in India Can Become Change Agents With Education

Muslim women would have realised their full potential and they will ensure that India and the world do as well

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Muslim Women
Muslim mother and daughter. Pixabay
  • Narendra Modi called for empowerment and education of Muslim women
  • The literacy rate and the higher education statistics represent a double whammy for Muslim women as it relates to empowerment

June 25, 2017: Prime Minister Narendra Modi recently called for empowerment and education of Muslim women. One would have expected this message to receive widespread acceptance and support. It did not.

There was resistance on several fronts for a variety of reasons. Some saw Modi’s move as a political stunt. Some questioned whether Modi was doing anything meaningful in the education and empowerment area. Others came out against it because of a connection to the triple-talaq controversy.

There is no gainsaying that there is an unequivocal and critical need to empower Muslim women through education in order for India to achieve its full potential. The status of education in general was captured by the 2001 census which revealed that the Muslim literacy rate was only 59 per cent.

ALSO READ: Goddess Bonbibi: Here is Why this Goddess in Sunderban unites both Hindus and Muslims!

In response to these and additional findings regarding Muslims and others in the weaker sections, the Sachar Committee Report of 2006 disclosed a development deficit in a number of areas. The report resulted in the creation of an across-the-board programme for the development of minorities.

This programme and other initiatives have had a beneficial effect. In the 2011 census, the overall literacy rate for Muslims went up substantially to 68.5 per cent against the national literacy rate of 74 percent.

That was good news. But the numbers within the numbers tell a different story. The worst literacy rate for women in India is among those in the Muslim community at less than 52 percent. That is cause for concern.

Even more worrying is the performance of Muslims in terms of higher education. A US India Policy Institute released in 2013, six years after the Sachar Report, showed that only 11 per cent of Muslims in India pursue higher education compared to a national average of approximately 19 per cent. Most significantly, that study revealed that there has been a decline in the general category of Muslims participating in higher education.

The literacy rate and the higher education statistics represent a double whammy for Muslim women as it relates to empowerment. In education, literacy is the starting line and higher education is the finishing line for becoming fully empowered. These statistics indicate that not enough Muslim women even get to the starting line and very few get to the finishing line.

This must change. Muslim women must be able to participate fully along the entire educational continuum. This participation is pivotal for the future of the individual Muslim woman, the Muslim family and India.

For the individual Muslim woman, education itself is empowering. It removes the shackles of ignorance. It develops the knowledge, skills and attitudes to pursue and create one’s own destiny. It builds self-esteem and confidence. Education is the gift that keeps on giving. It is an opportunity creator and bridge to the future.

For the Muslim family, education prepares the Muslim woman to be a change agent. Too many Muslim families are trapped in poverty because of a lack of education. With her own education, the woman can educate and equip her children to escape that trap. I firmly believe education is a powerful equaliser, opening doors to Muslim women to lift themselves out of poverty.

For India, education delivers on the promise of the largest representative democracy in the world. Central to that promise are equality, opportunity and inclusive economic mobility. Education levels the playing field and makes that promise a reality. Once that reality exists for Muslim women they will be able to deliver on that promise for India by helping others up the ladder of success. They will have the capacity to change the face of India and the landscape of the world.

In the 21st century, higher education is becoming more important for climbing that ladder. By higher education, I don’t just mean four-year colleges or universities. I include technical, vocational and professional education at the secondary levels.

It might seem that I am a little delusional given the current circumstances in talking about Muslim women and higher education. But that is not the case.

On my last visit to India in February this year, I had the good fortune to give addresses and speak with young Muslim women students at Fatima Girls Inter College in Azamgarh and Abdullah Women’s College at Aligarh Muslim University (AMU). I was inspired by them and their commitment to making a positive difference in India.

During that visit, my wife Debbie and I also dedicated the new Management Complex that we had financed at AMU. In my comments at the dedication ceremonies, I predicted that from this Complex “will come the future leaders who will make India and the world a better place.”

Many of those leaders will be educated and empowered Muslim women who will be in the forefront of empowering other Muslim women who will then educate and empower other Muslim women — and the cycle will continue.

When that occurs, those Muslim women would have realised their full potential and they will ensure that India and the world do as well. When they succeed, all of us succeed. India succeeds. The world succeeds. (IANS)

 

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Don’t make Holi an excuse to binge on unhealthy calories and accumulate Health risks!

Try some healthy snacks like roasted hare kabab, grilled paneer tikka, rawa idli, broccoli and lentil chaat, this holi!

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Holi, Wikimedia

New Delhi, March 9, 2017: Don’t make Holi an excuse to binge on unhealthy calories and accumulate health risks. Go for detox and ditch too much of sweets, says an expert.

Sonia Narang, Nutrition Expert, Oriflame India, shares some tips that can help you to eat right on this Holi.

* Eat right and combat overeating. Gujiya and papri among a dozen other dishes are a must, but you must maintain the calorie consumption. For instance, take a spoonful instead of a full serving.

* You can increase water intake and salads to curb your appetite. Drink at least eight glasses of water for keeping your body hydrated. Try to stay away from drinks such as thandai and other alcoholic beverages.

* Plan your meal in such a way that one special meal of the day should most likely be lunch, so that day activities and movements can burn the extra amount of calories. Try keeping your breakfast light and healthy while dinner should be as light as possible to manage the intake of calories.

* Don’t neglect your exercise routine, keep your body active and compensate for the extra calories that are consumed.

* Try some healthy snacks like roasted hare kabab, grilled paneer tikka, rawa idli, broccoli and lentil chaat.

* Make a smoothie of strawberries, raspberries, apple, grapes and fresh ripened tomatoes. Add a little water and serve chilled. (IANS)