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Indian Origin Scientist Kailash Sahu and team in US used Albert Einstein’s Theory to Weigh Stars

Kailash Chandra Sahu, an Indian-origin astronomer, led a group of scientists to weigh white dwarf stars using Einstein's General Theory of Relativity.

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Kailash Chandra Sahu
The Hubble Telescope hovering in space. Wikimedia
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  • A team of scientists in the US has successfully weighed the mass of a white dwarf star using Einstein’s predictions and theory
  • The group of scientists was led by an Indian-origin astronomer Kailash Chandra Sahu
  • This is the first time that the weight of a star has been measured using Einstein’s theory

US, June 10, 2017: Albert Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity is a century old. Yet, every year new developments in scientific knowledge are emerging through this basic formulated theory by Einstein.

The theory of relativity has once again provided development in our knowledge of the cosmos. In the US, a group of scientists has measured the mass of a white dwarf star by using the century-old theory.

The group was led by an Indian-origin astronomer Kailash Chandra Sahu at the Space Telescope Science Institute. The team used the Hubble Space Telescope to calculate the mass. Sahu is also the lead author of the research paper.

ALSO READ: Albert Einstein’s Century-old Prediction Comes True: Third Gravitational Waves detected by Scientists

The essence of the study lies in the technicality used by the scientists. They observed the white dwarf star as it passed by a distant star. When the two stars closely aligned, scientists analyzed the deflection in the light of the distant star caused by the gravity of the white dwarf star. The deflection in the sky would appear offset by 2 milliarcseconds!

The deflection may be incredibly tiny but it helped the scientists calculate the dwarf’s mass.

Einstein had hypothesized that a ray of light from a different star passing by an object would bend due to the gravity pull of the passing object. The study is published in the journal called Science.

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

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Researchers Have Successfully Created Artificial Placenta

Initial tests have already shown that the artificial placenta on the chip does in fact behave in a similar way to a natural placenta: small molecules are allowed to pass through, while large ones are held back, the researchers noted.

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Artificial placenta created in lab using 3D printing. Flickr
Artificial placenta created in lab using 3D printing. Flickr

Using a high-resolution 3D printing process, Austrian researchers have succeeded in creating an artificial placenta barrier on a chip, a development that can be used to investigate important aspects of nutrient transport from the mother to the foetus.

The placenta ensures the exchange of important substances between the mother and her unborn child, whilst simultaneously blocking other substances from passing through.

“The transport of substances through biological membranes plays an important role in various areas of medicine,” said Aleksandr Ovsianikov, professor at the TU Wien university in Vienna.

“These include the blood-brain barrier, ingestion of food in the stomach and intestine, and also the placenta.”

This can help provide clarity on how the exchange of glucose between mother and child takes place. Wikimedia Commons
This can help provide clarity on how the exchange of glucose between mother and child takes place. Wikimedia Commons

Studies have shown that diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure in the mother can affect the transport of substances to the foetus. Until now however, it has been almost impossible to investigate the way in which the many parameters involved interact in such cases.

Using the 3D printing made it possible to produce customised hydrogel membranes directly within microfluidic chips, which are then populated with placenta cells.

This can help provide clarity on how the exchange of glucose between mother and child takes place, the researchers said.

The novel chip consists of two areas — one represents the foetus, the other the mother. Using a specially developed femtosecond laser-based 3D printing process helped produce a partition between them — the artificial placenta membrane.

The high-resolution 3D printing involved a hydrogel with good biocompatibility.

Also Read: Obesity During Pregnancy May up Kid’s Risk of Epilepsy

“Based on the model of the natural placenta, we produce a surface with small, curved villi. The placenta cells can then colonise it, creating a barrier very similar to the natural placenta,” Ovsianikov explained.

Initial tests have already shown that the artificial placenta on the chip does in fact behave in a similar way to a natural placenta: small molecules are allowed to pass through, while large ones are held back, the researchers noted. (IANS)