Monday January 20, 2020
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Kaiterra Launches Laser Egg+ CO2 Air Quality Monitor in India for Rs 16,995

The addition of the Laser Egg+ CO2 to our dynamic product portfolio brings CO2 monitoring to consumers' fingertips

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Kaiterra, Laser, Egg+
This is the first indoor air quality monitor for homes from Kaiterra to measure CO2, in addition to four other key pollutant indicators - PM2.5, air quality index, temperature and humidity. Flickr

Beijing-based healthcare firm Kaiterra, on Monday launched Laser Egg+ CO2 air quality monitor in India for Rs 16,995.

This is the first indoor air quality monitor for homes from Kaiterra to measure CO2, in addition to four other key pollutant indicators – PM2.5, air quality index, temperature and humidity.

“The addition of the Laser Egg+ CO2 to our dynamic product portfolio brings CO2 monitoring to consumers’ fingertips. Most consumers do not realise that moderate levels of CO2 commonly found in their home can lead to a cumulative negative impact on health and wellbeing,” Liam Bates, CEO and Co-founder of Kaiterra said in a statement.

Kaiterra, Laser, Egg+
Beijing-based healthcare firm Kaiterra, on Monday launched Laser Egg+ CO2 air quality monitor in India for Rs 16,995. Pixabay

The Laser Egg+ CO2 is powered by sensors and a cloud-based calibration which aims to provide accurate, real-time readings from reference-grade monitors stationed across the globe.

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Like its predecessors, Laser Egg+ CO2 can be monitored from a mobile device via the Kaiterra App. The app provides consumers with access to trends and real-time monitoring, as well as the ability to set alerts when air exceeds the pre-selected level. (IANS)

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Egg Consumption Not Linked to Heart Disease: Study

The meta-analysis included in the advisory included randomised, controlled, dietary intervention trials designed to prove cause and effect

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Egg
As per the advisory, in general, Egg intake was not significantly associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease in the studies that were examined. Pixabay

Heart-healthy diets are naturally low in dietary cholesterol and can help reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, say researchers, adding eating one Egg a day is not associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Too much cholesterol in blood contributes to formation of thick, hard deposits in arteries, a process that underlies most heart diseases and strokes.

Reducing dietary cholesterol by focusing on an overall heart-healthy diets that replace saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats remains good advice for keeping artery-clogging LDL (low-density lipoprotein) levels healthy, according to the scientific advisory from the American Heart Association.

“Saturated fats — mostly found in animal products such as meat and full fat dairy, as well as tropical oils — should be replaced with polyunsaturated fats like corn, canola or soybean oils,” said Jo Ann S. Carson from UT Southwestern Medical Center in the US.

“Foods high in added sugars and sodium (salt) should be limited,” Carson said.

The meta-analysis included in the advisory included randomised, controlled, dietary intervention trials designed to prove cause and effect.

According to the study, published in the journal Circulation, there is a dose-dependent relation between dietary cholesterol and higher levels of artery-clogging LDL when the range of dietary cholesterol tested was beyond that normally eaten.

This relationship persists after adjustment for dietary fat type. As per the advisory, in general, egg intake was not significantly associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease in the studies that were examined.

Egg
Heart-healthy diets are naturally low in dietary cholesterol and can help reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, say researchers, adding eating one Egg a day is not associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Pixabay

According to researchers, it’s reasonable to eat one whole Egg (or its equivalent such as 3 ounces of shrimp) daily as part of a heart-healthy diet for healthy individuals.

“Consideration of the relationship between dietary cholesterol and CVD risk can’t ignore two aspects of diet. First, most foods contributing cholesterol to the US diet are usually high in saturated fat, which is strongly linked to an increased risk of too much LDL,” Carson said.

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“Second, we know from an enormous body of scientific studies that heart-healthy dietary patterns, such as Mediterranean and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets are inherently low in cholesterol,” Carson said. (IANS)