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Image: Kashmir Observer

Image: Kashmir Observer

Image: Kashmir Observer

By Ishan Kukreti


The Mufti Mohammad Sayeed-led government in Jammu and Kashmir has back tracked from its promise of giving 1500 acres of land for the rehabilitation of Kashmiri Pandits. Now, a mere 50 acres of land will be available for their resettling in the Valley.

According to BJP spokesperson Sanjay Kaul, “J&K Chief Minister Mufti Muhammad Sayeed has reduced the land size for rehabilitation of Kashmiri Pandits form 1500 acres to mere 50 acres.”

Speaking to NewsGram, Kaul said, “A rally will be organised today at Jantar Mantar at 10 am by Kashmiri Pandits to raise a voice against government’s indifference towards Pandits.” He said that around 5,000 people will participate to give the sticky political issue of homeland in the valley a solid push.

“It’s a show of strength for the cause of homeland for Kashmiri Pandits. The aim of the rally is to send a message that the Pandits are united and pressurize the government to take some concrete steps towards resolving a 25 year old problem,” the BJP spokesperson said.

Naim Akhtar, spokesperson for the PDP, could not be contacted for comments, while PDP’s Rangeel Singh declined to talk about the issue.

Meanwhile, Pakistani Foreign Ministry on Thursday had claimed that the Indian government’s plan to resettle Kashmiri Pandits was a ploy to change the demography of the “only Muslim state” of India.

“Any effort to create special dedicated townships or zones, or any other step to alter the demographic make-up of Jammu and Kashmir, is in violation of the UN Security Council resolutions,” spokeswoman of the Foreign Ministry of Pakistan, Tasneem Aslam had said.

The statement’s repercussion was seen in the state as Pakistani flags were waved in Syed Ali Shah Geelani’s rally at Tral on Friday. Jammu too witnessed agitation as people burnt effigies of Geelani and raised slogans against the separatists.


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