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photo credit: www.indiatvnews.com

By NewGram Staff Writer

Srinagar: At least 2 army soldiers were killed on Thursday in a gunfight between the security forces and separatist guerrillas in North Kashmir’s Kupwara district.



photo credit: www.oneindia.com

photo credit: www.oneindia.com

“An encounter started at Laribal Rajwar (Handwara) forest area in Kupwara district between troops of 21 Rashtriya Rifles (RR) and militants during the night. Two jawans of the RR have been killed in this encounter as per reports received,” a senior police officer revealed in summer capital Srinagar on Friday, adding that the gun fight was still on.

Reinforcements have been rushed to the spot to augment the strength of the security forces and hunt down the militants, the officer added.

Here it must be quoted what Kashmiri separatist leader Shabir Shah had said last month. All the militants who had given their lives over the Kashmir issue were like freedom fighter Bhagat Singh. “The way India celebrates Bhagat Singh, the same way militants are our heroes,” he had remarked.

This fight between militants and separatists has existed in Kashmir for long, giving way to so many conflicts and gunfights. Toll of casualties due to this conflict has always risen in Kashmir. The roots of the conflict between the Kashmiri insurgents and the Indian Government are tied to a dispute over local autonomy.

(With inputs from IANS)


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