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Kerala Woman Gives Birth to a Healthy Baby Boy, 35,000 feet above in Jet flight

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Mumbai/Kochi, June 18, 2017: A Kerala woman gave birth to a healthy baby boy while flying at a height of 35,000 feet on Jet Airways’s Dammam-Kochi flight on Sunday morning, officials said. Both mother and child are in “stable condition”.

Jet’s 9W-569 flight, with 162 passengers on board, was diverted to Mumbai for handling the medical emergency as the 29-year-old C. Jose, who was travelling alone, went into premature labour on Sunday morning when the plane was flying in Pakistan airspace.

The flight crew made an announcement to find out if there was any doctor on board, but there was only a trained paramedic, Mini Wilson, who stepped forward to help.

Jose was shifted to the first class, where Wilson, assisted by cabin crew comprising Mohammad Taj Hayath, Deborah Tavares, Isha Jayakar, Sushmita David, Cathering Lepcha and Tejas Chavan, helped deliver the baby boy safely.

Upon landing, mother and child were rushed to the Holy Spirit Hospital in Andheri east where their condition was reported to be “stable”.

Jet Airways announced that being the first baby to be born in flight for the airlines, the kid would get a free lifetime pass for any travel on the carrier.

Jet Airways also informed Jose’s family, who are rushing to Mumbai.

After a two-hour halt for the medical emergency, the flight departed for its onward destination to Kochi.

Talking to IANS, Cochin International Airport Ltd. Managing Director V.J. Kurian confirmed the incident, but did not have more details. (IANS)

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Radiation From Smartphones May up Miscarriage Risk: Study

This study provides evidence from a human population that magnetic field non-ionising radiation could have adverse biological impacts on human health

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Pregnant woman using smartphones
Pregnant woman using smartphone.

Pregnant women’s exposure to non-ionising radiation from smartphones, Bluetooth devices and laptops may more than double the risk of miscarriage, a study has showed.

Non-ionising radiation — radiation that produces enough energy to move around atoms in a molecule, but not enough to remove electrons completely — from magnetic fields is produced when electric devices are in use and electricity is flowing.

It can be generated by a number of environmental sources, including electric appliances, power lines and transformers, wireless devices and wireless networks.

While the health hazards from ionising radiation are well-established and include radiation sickness, cancer and genetic damage, the evidence of health risks to humans from non-ionising radiation remains limited, said De-Kun Li, a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist at the Kaiser Permanente — a US-based health care firm.

For the study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, the team asked for 913 pregnant women over age 18 to wear a small (a bit larger than a deck of cards) magnetic-field monitoring device for 24 hours.

Pregnant woman using smartphones
Representational image.

After controlling for multiple other factors, women who were exposed to higher magnetic fields levels had 2.72 times the risk of miscarriage than those with lower magnetic fields exposure.

The increased risk of miscarriage associated with high magnetic fields was consistently observed regardless of the sources of high magnetic fields. The association was much stronger if magnetic fields was measured on a typical day of participants’ pregnancies.

The finding also demonstrated that accurate measurement of magnetic field exposure is vital for examining magnetic field health effects.

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“This study provides evidence from a human population that magnetic field non-ionising radiation could have adverse biological impacts on human health,” Li noted.

“We hope that the finding from this study will stimulate much-needed additional studies into the potential environmental hazards to human health, including the health of pregnant women,” he said. (Bollywood Country)

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