Saturday October 20, 2018

Key facts regarding China’s invasion of Tibet

A glimpse of how China has destroying Tibet's land and culture

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A Tibean monastery Image: Wikimedia Commons
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By Shubhi Mangla

Tibet is located in the center of Asia and south west China bordering Nepal, Bhutan, India and Burma.  It is a vast plateau with an altitude of 15,000 above sea level. It comprises of a unique culture, language and regional and political system.

In 1949, when Chairman Mao came to power, he peacefully liberated Tibet and sent troops to conquer it. Tibet being a small territory with a not so large army was easily crushed by the Chinese army. In 1951, an agreement took place between the Tibetan government and China, which acknowledged China’s sovereignty over Tibet while giving the Tibetan government the autonomy regarding Tibet’s internal matters. But over the years, the Chinese have violated this treaty and established greater control.

A simple map of the three traditional provinces of Tibet overlaid on a map of modern provincial boundaries of the People's Republic of China. Source : Wikimedia Common
A simple map of the three traditional provinces of Tibet overlaid on a map of modern provincial boundaries of the People’s Republic of China.
Source : Wikimedia Commons

Today Tibet has been divided, renamed and integrated into Chinese provinces. Originally, Tibet has three provinces− Kham, U-Tsang and Amdo. When Tibet is referred in the context of China, it means the region of U-Tsang and part of Kham. The remaining part of Kham was divided between Yunnan and Sichuan Chinese provinces and Amdo between Gansu, Sichuan and Qinghai.

China has imposed harsh policies over Tibet. They have destroyed their natural resources and claim that Tibet has been a part of China since 800 years without any facts. They have denied them from basic human rights including right to speak.

Related : Watch video on why Tibet is burning?

Dalai Lama XIV Source: Wikimedia Commons
Dalai Lama XIV
Source: Wikimedia Commons

There have been many protests by Tibetans to protect their land and their spiritual and political leader, Dalai Lama which has only led to Tibetans sacrificing their lives. During the uprising of 1959, Dali Lama Dalai Lama took an exile in India with his followers. He and his followers are thriving to make Tibet an independent and democratic state since years.

 

Here are some facts regarding Tibet

  • About 1.2 million people have lost their lives after China’s invasion of Tibet in 1950. It is hard to find a family who didn’t have at least on member jailed or killed by the Chinese. Approximately 17 percent of Tibetan population has been killed.
Tibetan monk self immolates in Nepal Image: voanews
Tibetan monk self immolates in Nepal
Image: voanews
  • Tibet’s rivers provide water to over 1 billion people across Asia. Tibetan plateau is the third largest source of water and ice in the world. Its glaciers, rivers, forests and wetland are important resources for China’s global power.
  • China uses torture to make Tibetans confess their crimes if they don’t confess out of fear. According to The Guardian, “Chinese security agents continue to employ a medieval array of torture methods against government opponents, activists, lawyers and petitioners, including spiked rods, iron torture chairs and electric batons, a report claims”.
  • There is mass immigration of Chinese in Tibetan region. Tibetans have less as compared to the Chinese people in their own land and have been reduced to the status of a minority.
  • According to freetibet.org, “Over 100 counties have achieved independence in the time that Tibet has been occupied”.
  • The so called Tibetan Autonomous Region of China covers an area of 1,220,000 square kilometers which accounts for 12 percent of China’s total area. This tells us how Tibet is being wiped off the map.
  • Tibetan monasteries are a key part of their rich cultural and religious significance where Tibetan Monks and nuns hold educational projects, old age homes and orphanages. Large number of monasteries has been destroyed since 1960s as the Chinese consider them as a threat. 99% of them are closed due to communist rule.
  • It is one of the most repressed countries in the world alongside Saudi Arabia, North Korea and Syria.

Shubhi Mangla is an intern at Newsgram and a student of Journalism and Mass Communication in New Delhi. Twitter @shubhi_mangla

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  • Pritam Go Green

    Say hello to United States. Yes this is the desired help we need in order to stop China . First South China Sea and now Tibet. I mean what are these Chinese people trying to prove ? Probably take over the entire world -__-

  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    Tibet is in pathetic situation. Something has to be done in order to stop China or else Tibet would surely lose its identity

SHARE
  • Pritam Go Green

    Say hello to United States. Yes this is the desired help we need in order to stop China . First South China Sea and now Tibet. I mean what are these Chinese people trying to prove ? Probably take over the entire world -__-

  • Pashchiema Bhatia

    Tibet is in pathetic situation. Something has to be done in order to stop China or else Tibet would surely lose its identity

Next Story

Shanghai Airport Gets Check-In With Facial Recognition Machines

Increased convenience may come at a cost in a country with few rules on how the government can use biometric data.

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Shanghai,
A U.S. Customs and Border Protection facial recognition device is ready to scan another passenger at a United Airlines gate. VOA

It’s now possible to check in automatically at Shanghai Hongqiao airport using facial recognition technology, part of an ambitious rollout of facial recognition systems in China that has raised privacy concerns as Beijing pushes to become a global leader in the field.

Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport unveiled self-service kiosks for flight and baggage check-in, security clearance and boarding powered by facial recognition technology, according to the Civil Aviation Administration of China.

Similar efforts are under way at airports in Beijing and Nanyang city, in central China’s Henan province.

Shanghai,
Face recognition tool was first launched in 2012

Many airports in China already use facial recognition to help speed security checks, but Shanghai’s system, which debuted Monday, is being billed as the first to be fully automated.

“It is the first time in China to achieve self-service for the whole check-in process,” said Zhang Zheng, general manager of the ground services department for Spring Airlines, the first airline to adopt the system at Hongqiao airport. Currently, only Chinese identity card holders can use the technology.

Spring Airlines, Shanghai said Tuesday that passengers had embraced automated check-in, with 87 percent of 5,017 people who took Spring flights on Monday using the self-service kiosks, which can cut down check-in times to less than a minute and a half.

Shanghai,
Rana el Kaliouby, CEO of the Boston-based artificial intelligence firm Affectiva, demonstrates the company’s facial recognition technology, in Boston, April 23, 2018. VOA

Across greater China, facial recognition is finding its way into daily life. Mainland police have used facial recognition systems to identify people of interest in crowds and nab jaywalkers, and are working to develop an integrated national system of surveillance camera data.

Chinese media are filled with reports of ever-expanding applications: A KFC outlet in Hangzhou, near Shanghai, where it’s possible to pay using facial recognition technology; a school that uses facial recognition cameras to monitor students’ reactions in class; and hundreds of ATMs in Macau equipped with facial recognition devices to curb money laundering.

Also Read: Facial Recognition Technology Catches A Person With Fake Passpost At The US Airport 

But increased convenience may come at a cost in a country with few rules on how the government can use biometric data.

“Authorities are using biometric and artificial intelligence to record and track people for social control purposes,” said Maya Wang, senior China researcher for Human Rights Watch. “We are concerned about the increasing integration and use of facial recognition technologies throughout the country because it provides more and more data points for the authorities to track people.” (VOA)