Saturday November 16, 2019

Key Tips for Baby’s Skin Care this Monsoon

The damp and humid weather can cause excessive sweating and lead to rashes and infections

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Baby, Skin, Care
With a change in the season, it is always a good idea to change your baby's skin care routine to a more season-friendly one by choosing the right products. Pixabay

A baby’s delicate skin needs the right nourishment and ample care, especially during the monsoon. With a change in the season, it is always a good idea to change your baby’s skin care routine to a more season-friendly one by choosing the right products; those with natural ingredients can further help tackle monsoon-related skin concerns.

Dr. Subhashini N.S., Ayurveda Expert, Discovery Sciences Group, R&D, The Himalaya Drug Company, says: “The damp and humid weather can cause excessive sweating and lead to rashes and infections. Rashes, cradle cap and itchy scalp are also common concerns during the monsoon. This makes it important to take care of baby’s sensitive skin and ensure it is hydrated. A good way to ensure this is by using mild products that contain natural ingredients and are free from phthalates, parabens, alcohol, artificial colour/dyes, mineral oils and animal-derived ingredients.”

Dr. Subhashini shares key tips for baby’s skin care this monsoon:

* For a bath, ensure you use a gentle soap which is mild and infused with herbs that help keep the skin soft and hydrated. Using a baby soap infused with olive oil and almond oil helps protect and soften baby’s skin. While olive oil helps nourish, almond oil helps moisturise baby’s skin.

Baby, Skin, Care
A baby’s delicate skin needs the right nourishment and ample care, especially during the monsoon. Pixabay

* For parents who prefer using a wash, you can opt for a gentle wash that helps keep baby’s skin soft and supple. A baby wash infused with the goodness of green gram and chickpea works as a gentle cleanser for baby’s delicate skin. Green gram helps keep the skin soft and supple and chickpea soothes the skin.

* For hair care during the monsoon, ensure to give your baby a head bath at least twice a week. This helps manage cradle cap and refreshes the scalp and hair. You can opt for a gentle shampoo infused with hibiscus and chickpea. Hibiscus helps condition the hair and chickpea helps nourish the hair.

* For skin care, you can opt for a calamine-based lotion with natural ingredients like aloe vera, nut grass oil and mustard oil. It is a mild solution to help treat rashes and relieve skin irritation.

* Post bath, using a diaper rash cream infused with almond oil and Yashada Bhasma can help tackle diaper rashes. Almond Oil helps moisturise the skin and Yashada Bhasma reduces skin inflammation and irritation caused due to diaper rashes.

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The best way to protect your little one from skin infections and rashes during the monsoon is by keeping your baby clean and dry. Also, ensure to change the diapers at regular intervals, which will help prevent rashes. With these few simple measures, you can keep skin concerns at bay and enjoy the rainy season together! (IANS)

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Skin Exposure to UVB Light Alters Gut Bacteria For Good: Study

In a new clinical pilot study, researchers tested the effect of skin UVB exposure on the human gut microbiome

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UVB Light causes gut microbiome changes, via vitamin D production, it has so far been shown only in rodents. Pixabay

Skin exposure to ultra-violet B, also known as UVB Light radiation from the Sun can alter the gut microbiome in humans — possibly via vitamin D which can help explain the protective role of UVB in inflammatory diseases like Multiple Sclerosis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Sun exposure, vitamin D levels and the mix of bacteria in our gut are each associated with risk of inflammatory conditions like MS and IBD, said scientists from University of British Columbia.

Exposure to UVB in sunlight is well-known to drive vitamin D production in the skin, and recent studies suggest that vitamin D alters the human gut microbiome.

However, that UVB, therefore, causes gut microbiome changes, via vitamin D production, has so far been shown only in rodents.

In a new clinical pilot study, researchers tested the effect of skin UVB exposure on the human gut microbiome.

Healthy female volunteers were given three, one-minute sessions of full-body UVB exposure in a single week.

Before and after treatment, stool samples were taken for analysis of gut bacteria – as well blood samples for vitamin D levels.

Skin UVB exposure significantly increased gut microbial diversity, but only in subjects who were not taking vitamin D supplements.

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Exposure to UVB in sunlight is well-known to drive vitamin D production in the skin, and recent studies suggest that vitamin D alters the human gut microbiome. Pixabay

“Prior to UVB exposure, these women had a less diverse and balanced gut microbiome than those taking regular vitamin D supplements,” reported Professor Bruce Vallance, who led the University of British Columbia study.

“UVB exposure boosted the richness and evenness of their microbiome to levels indistinguishable from the supplemented group, whose microbiome was not significantly changed”.

Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, the analysis suggests that vitamin D mediates the change — which could help explain the protective effect of UVB light in inflammatory diseases like MS and IBD.

The largest effect was an increase in the relative abundance of “Lachnospiraceae” bacteria after the UVB light exposures.

This indicates that vitamin D at least partly mediates UVB-induced gut microbiome changes.

The study is not designed to show the exact mechanism by which the microbiome changes occur, but both UVB and vitamin D are known to influence the immune system.

UVB
Skin exposure to ultra-violet B, also known as UVB Light radiation from the Sun can alter the gut microbiome in humans. Pixabay

“It is likely that exposure to UVB light somehow alters the immune system in the skin initially, then more systemically, which in turn affects how favourable the intestinal environment is for the different bacteria,” suggests Vallance.

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The results have implications for people who are undergoing UVB phototherapy, said scientists. (IANS)