Sunday July 21, 2019

Kicking the Habit of Smoking Works Best in Pairs: Study

Lampridou noted that research is needed to confirm the findings in smokers who are otherwise healthy

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A person smoking cigarette, Pixabay

Is addiction not letting you quit smoking? Relax. A new study suggests that kicking the habit works best in pairs. The study, presented at EuroPrevent 2019, showed that couples who attempted to stop smoking together had a six-fold chance of success compared to patients who attempted it alone.

“Quitting smoking can be a lonely endeavour. People feel left out when they skip the smoke breaks at work or avoid social occasions. On top of that, there are nicotine withdrawal symptoms. Partners can distract each other from the cravings by going for a walk or to the cinema and encouraging replacement activities like eating healthy food or meditating when alone. Active support works best, rather than nagging,” said Magda Lampridou, Researcher from the Imperial College London in Britain.

For the study, the researchers evaluated the supporting role married or cohabiting partners might have in smoking cessation and enrolled 222 current smokers who were at high risk of cardiovascular disease or had suffered a heart attack.

Burning Cigarette. Wikimedia

The couples attended preventive cardiology programmes and during the 16-week programme, they were offered nicotine replacement therapy with patches and gum. In one programme, participants could choose the prescription drug, varenicline instead.

At the end of the programme, the findings revealed that 64 per cent of patients and 75 per cent of partners had quit smoking compared to none and 55 per cent in the beginning.

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European Society of Cardiology (ESC) cardiovascular prevention guidelines advise against tobacco in any form and people who stop smoking generally halve their risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Lampridou noted that research is needed to confirm the findings in smokers who are otherwise healthy. (IANS)

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53% Smokers Belong to the Age Group of 20-30 Years, Reveals Survey

India is one of those countries reeling under a huge burden of high mortality and morbidity linked with tobacco addiction

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E-cigarettes, Smokers
A woman smokes an electronic cigarette in London, Aug. 19, 2015. VOA

A whopping 53 per cent of smokers belong to the age group of 20 to 30 years, a survey has revealed, adding most of them resort to smoking to cope with stress.

According to the survey conducted by Aviss Foundation, every third person in the age group of 15-50 years was addicted to smoking.

“Of all the respondents, which were between the age group of 15 to 50 years, a whopping 33 per cent admitted to smoking addiction,” it said.

The survey revealed that youths took to smoking to beat the stress.

tobacco prodcuts, excise duty
Hookah smoking is addictive and can lead to the use of other tobacco products such as cigarettes. Pixabay

“According to the survey figures, 56 per cent thought that smoking helped them get relief from stress while 55 per cent of them admitted that they are aware of its ill-effects and were anxious about their health but continue to smoke anyway. Apart from this, 55 per cent had tried to quit smoking but failed, underlying the strong addictive nature of smoking leading to difficulties in giving up,” it added.

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India is one of those countries reeling under a huge burden of high mortality and morbidity linked with tobacco addiction. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), India is home to 12 per cent of the world’s smokers.

“While government policies in India have always been designed carefully around the targeted awareness programmes, the survey figures indicate that it’s time to sit up and fine-tune our strategies to address the issue more effectively,” said Aviss Foundation head Prerana Garg. (IANS)