Saturday February 22, 2020

Kids with Autism More Likely to Be Bullied by Both Their Siblings and Their Peers

Children with autism experience difficulties with social interaction and communication, which may have implications

0
//
The study, published in the journal Autism and Developmental Disorders, also found that children with autism are more likely to be both the victims and perpetrators of sibling bullying compared to those without autism. Pixabay

Parents, please take note. Kids with autism are more likely to be bullied by both their siblings and their peers, meaning that when they return from school, they have no respite from victimisation, warn researchers.

The study, published in the journal Autism and Developmental Disorders, also found that children with autism are more likely to be both the victims and perpetrators of sibling bullying compared to those without autism.

“Children with autism experience difficulties with social interaction and communication, which may have implications for their relationships with siblings,” said study lead author Umar Toseeb from the University of York.

“From an evolutionary perspective, siblings may be considered competitors for parental resources such as affection, attention and material goods – children with autism might get priority access to these limited parental resources leading to conflict and bullying between siblings,” he said.

Kids, Autism, Bullied
Kids with autism are more likely to be bullied by both their siblings and their peers, meaning that when they return from school, they have no respite from victimisation, warn researchers. Pixabay

The researchers used data of over 8,000 children, more than 231 of which had autism, to investigate sibling bullying.

For the findings, the children were asked questions about how often they were picked on or hurt on purpose by their siblings and peers and how often they were the perpetrators of such acts.

The study revealed that, at the age of 11 years, two thirds of children with autism reported being involved in some form of sibling bullying.

While there was a decrease in bullying for children in both groups by the time they reached the age of 14 years, children with autism were still more likely to be involved in two-way sibling bullying, as a victim and a perpetrator.

Also Read- Pre-Schoolers with Symptoms of ADHD Take More Time to Be School-Ready

According to the researchers, children involved in sibling bullying, irrespective of whether they had autism or not, were more likely to experience emotional and behavioural difficulties both in the long- and short-term. (IANS)

Next Story

Family Conflict may Influence Suicidal Thoughts in Kids: Study

Parents, caregivers and people working with children should be aware of the possibility that a 9-year-old is thinking about suicide, Barch said

0
Suicide depression
The researchers said that the evidence was particularly strong for the suicide risk link, but the effect was smaller than for depression. Lifetime Stock

Family conflict and parental monitoring are significant predictors of suicidal thoughts in children as young as 9- and 10-year olds, says a study.

The majority of children surveyed in the study had caregivers who either did not know, or did not report, the suicidal thoughts of the children in their charge.

Historically, the belief has been that people don’t need to ask kids about suicidal thoughts before adolescence, said Deanna Barch, Professor at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, US.

“Our data suggests that’s absolutely not true. Kids are having these thoughts. They’re not at the same rates as adults, but they are nontrivial,” she added.

The study, published in the journal JAMA Network Open, looked at 11,814 children between ages 9 and 10 from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, a longitudinal study in the US on adolescent brain health in which caretakers also participate.

Dividing suicidal thoughts and actions into several categories, researchers found that 2.4 to 6.2 per cent of the children reported having thoughts about suicide, from wishing they were dead to devising — but not carrying out — a plan.

mother
Mother-daughter conflict ups suicide risk in abused teen girls: Study. Pixabay

When it came to actions, they saw 0.9 per cent of these 9- and -10-year-olds said they had tried to commit suicide; 9.1 per cent reported non-suicidal self-injury.

In more than 75 per cent of cases where children self-reported suicidal thoughts or behaviours, the caregivers did not know about the child’s experience, said the study.

The researchers found that family conflict was a predictor of suicidal thoughts and non-suicidal self-injury. Monitoring by a caretaker was also predictive of those measures, as well as suicide attempts.

Also Read: China Virus Set to Throw MWC Barcelona 2020 out of Gear

Parents, caregivers and people working with children should be aware of the possibility that a 9-year-old is thinking about suicide, Barch said.

“If you have kids who are distressed in some way, you should be asking about this,” she said, adding that caregivers can help identify kids who might be in trouble. (IANS)