Monday April 22, 2019

Kids of Mothers With Type-1 Diabetes at Risk of Being Overweight

Children of mothers with Type-1 diabetes had a significantly higher body mass index than children from mothers without diabetes

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The findings, published in the journal Diabetologia, were based on data from nearly 2,800 children with a first-degree relative with Type-1 diabetes.
New shoe insole could treat diabetic foot ulcers. Pixabay

Children of mothers with Type-1 diabetes are at significantly higher risk of being overweight and of exhibiting insulin resistance, new research has found.

“Our study shows that children of mothers with Type-1 diabetes are not only at significantly higher risk of having the condition itself, but are also at greater risk of being overweight and developing insulin resistance,” said one of the researchers Anette-Gabriele Ziegler from Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen – German Research Center for Environmental Health, Munich-Neuherberg.

“We would therefore advise that paediatricians should bear this correlation in mind, so that they can react on early warning signs in such children,” Ziegler added.

The findings, published in the journal Diabetologia, were based on data from nearly 2,800 children with a first-degree relative with Type-1 diabetes.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

“Their metabolic status and body weight were tracked up to the age of 18,” said lead author Anitha Pitchika from Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen.

Type-1 diabetes is the most common metabolic disorder in childhood. It was already known that children of parents with Type-1 diabetes are at much higher risk of developing the disease than the rest of the population.

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“Moreover, there were also sporadic indications from previous studies that children of mothers with Type-1 diabetes are also at increased risk of having metabolic syndrome, as the intermittent high blood glucose levels in the uterus appear to have long-term effects on the child’s metabolism and body weight,” explained Andreas Beyerlein from Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen.

In this study, the researchers investigated this hypothesis with a large dataset and found that children of mothers with Type-1 diabetes had a significantly higher body mass index than children from mothers without diabetes. (IANS)

Next Story

Diabetes During Pregnancy Spikes up the Risk in Kids Later

For the study, the researchers included 73,180 mothers

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The study showed that a child or teenager whose mother had gestational diabetes -- diabetes during pregnancy -- was nearly twice as likely to develop diabetes before the age of 22 years. Pixabay

Children and youths whose mothers had diabetes during their pregnancy are themselves at an increased risk of the disorder, say researchers, including one of Indian-origin.

The study showed that a child or teenager whose mother had gestational diabetes — diabetes during pregnancy — was nearly twice as likely to develop diabetes before the age of 22 years.

The association was found in children from birth to the age of 22 years, from birth to 12 years, and from 12 to 22 years, said the study, published in Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Although Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes in parents are well-established risk factors for diabetes, we show that gestational diabetes mellitus may be a risk indicator for diabetes in the mother’s children before age 22,” said Kaberi Dasgupta, clinician-scientist from the McGill University in Canada.

“This link of diabetes in children and youth with gestational diabetes in the mother has the potential to stimulate clinicians, parents, and children and youth themselves to consider the possibility of diabetes if offspring of a mother with gestational diabetes mellitus develop signs and symptoms such as frequent urination, abnormal thirst, weight loss or fatigue,” said Dasgupta.

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According to World Health Organzation, diabetes can be treated and its consequences can be avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications.

For the study, the researchers included 73,180 mothers. (IANS)