Thursday June 20, 2019

Want to Know the Best Face Oil? These Five Will Definitely Help You!

Facial oils have a unique property of regenerating your skin. You can do the same for your face by knowing the best face oil for your skin type.

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Best face oil
Facial Oil

Benefits of Facial Oils for Skin

We always adore the ancient Egyptians for their flawless and vibrant beauty. Did you know that Oil is the real reason behind their beauty? Yes, that’s true! They applied Moringa oil. They considered Moringa oil as the best face oil. The thought of applying oil on your face may irk you to a great extent, but the benefits which oil gives you, cannot be given by cosmetic in this world. From preventing wrinkles to shrinking the enlarged face pores, they offer you a great deal. If you have dry skin, then oil acts as your skin’s antibiotic.

Five best face oils which can give you a flawless skin:

1. Jojoba Oil

Best face oil
Jojoba oil.                                                                                                                                                         Pixabay.

 

The Unique feature of Jojoba oil is its similarity to our skin structure.It gets completely dissolved in the skin; balances out sebum production and prevents acne. It is comprised of important minerals and nutrients and functions as an element of all-day moisture to the skin. It is the best face oil for skin types- sensitive, dry and aged.

 

2. Castor Oil

There can be nothing as good as Castor Oil to deal with skin breakouts. Its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties eliminate the acne-causing bacteria, which helps in the reduction of skin breakouts; thus, making it a great deal for skin types prone to breakouts. It consists of Vitamin E, proteins, minerals and unsaturated fatty acids. It can heal the scars of skin. It is the best face oil for skin types which struggle with acne and sunburns.

 

3. Tamanu Oil

Tamanu oil is being used in medicines since ages. It has the capability of healing wounds and regenerating skin cells by fighting bacteria. The oil contains a lipid, calophyllolide, which is highly anti-inflammatory. It is beneficial for broken skin and the skin damaged from acne.

 

Also ReadDo You Wish to Stay Healthy but are Scared of the word ‘Diet’? If so, then these Ayurvedic Diet Tips are for you! 

4. Hemp seed oil

Best face oil
Hemp seeds.                                                                                                                                                     Pixabay.

Hemp Seed Oil reduces facial pores and eliminates. Its anti-inflammatory properties induce elasticity in the skin. It comprises of 80% fatty acids and has the ideal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 EFA (Essential Fatty Acids). Hemp seed oil is the best face oil.

 

5. Rosehip oil

Best face oil
Rosehip.                                                                                                                                                      Pixabay.

Rosehip oil the best face oil for skin types- dry and oily. It penetrates to the deepest layers of the skin and regenerates cells. It is highly rich in vitamin C, Omega-6 and Omega-3 fatty acids, which help in curing scars. It also reduces the appearance of wrinkles and brightens the skin.

by Megha Acharya of NewsGram.   Megha can be reached at Twitter @ImMeghaacharya.

 

Next Story

US-China Trade War Sparks Worries about Rare Earth Minerals

Rising trade tensions between the U.S. and China have sparked worries

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Trade, Earth, Minerals
FILE - A mining machine is seen at the Bayan Obo mine containing rare earth minerals, in Inner Mongolia, China, July 16, 2011. VOA

Rising trade tensions between the U.S. and China have sparked worries about the 17 exotic-sounding rare earth minerals needed for high-tech products like robotics, drones and electric cars.

China recently raised tariffs to 25% on rare earth exports to the U.S. and has threatened to halt exports altogether after the Trump administration raised tariffs on Chinese products and blacklisted telecommunications giant Huawei.

With names like europium, scandium and ytterbium, the bulk of rare earth minerals are extracted from mines in China, where lower wages and lax environmental standards make production cheaper and easier.

But trade experts say no one should panic over China’s threats to stop exporting the elements to the U.S.

Trade, Earth, Minerals
FILE – In this April 30, 2009, photo, coral reefs grow in the waters of Tatawa Besar, Komodo islands, Indonesia. Rising demand for copper, cobalt, gold and the rare-earth elements vital in manufacturing smartphones and other high-tech products is causing a prospecting rush to the dark seafloor thousands of meters beneath the waves. VOA

There is a U.S. rare minerals mine in California. And Australia, Myanmar, Russia and India are also top producers of the somewhat obscure minerals. Vietnam and Brazil both have huge rare earth reserves.

“The sky is not falling,” said Mary B. Teagarden, a China specialist, professor and associate dean at the Thunderbird School of Global Management in Phoenix. “There are alternatives.”

Simon Lester, associate director of the center for trade policy studies at the Cato Institute think tank in Washington, agreed. “Over the short term, it could be a big disruption, but companies that want to stay in business will find a way,” he said.

Although the U.S. is among the world’s top 10 countries for rare earths production, it’s also a major importer of the minerals, looking to China for 80% of what it buys from other countries, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. China last year produced 120,000 metric tons of rare earths, while the United States produced 15,000 metric tons.

Also Read- China May Restrict Tech Access in Spiraling US Trade Dispute

Mountain Pass Mine

The United States also depends on China to separate the minerals pulled from Mountain Pass Mine, the sole rare earths mine in the U.S., which was bought two years ago by the Chicago-based JHL Capital Group LLC .

“We need to develop a U.S.-based supply chain so there is no possibility we can be threatened,” said Ryan S. Corbett, managing director of JHL Capital.

The mine’s top products are neodymium and praseodymium, two elements that are used together to make the lightweight magnets that help power electric cars and wind turbines and are found in electronics such as laptop hard drives.

Mountain Pass, located in San Bernardino County, Calif., was once the top supplier of the world’s rare earth minerals, but China began taking over the market in the 1990s and the U.S. mine stopped production in 2002.

Trade, Earth, Minerals
FILE – Workers are pictured at the site of the Lynas rare earth plant in Gebeng, eastern Malaysia, April 19, 2012. VOA

Mountain Pass later restarted production, only to close again amid a 2015 bankruptcy. Corbett said extraction resumed last year after JHL Capital purchased the site with QVT Financial LP of New York, which holds 30%, and Shenghe Resources Holding Co. Ltd. of China, a nonvoting shareholder with 9.9%.

Since then, Mountain Pass has focused on achieving greater autonomy with a $1.7 billion separation system set to go online late next year that would allow it to skip sending rare earths ore to China for that step.

China could hurt itself in the long run by cutting off the U.S., specialists said.

David Merriman, a rare earths analyst for Roskill commodity research in London, said that during a similar trade flap with China in 2011, Japan began looking to other countries, including Australia, for the minerals needed to manufacture electronics.

Also Read- Researchers Identify Master Cell Playing Key Role in Fighting TB

Australian rare earths production giant Lynas Corp. Ltd. this month announced a proposed deal with Blue Line Corp. of Texas for a separation facility at an industrial site in Hondo, Texas.

Other deposits

There may be other options, too. Deposits of rare earths have been detected in other U.S. states, including Wyoming and Alaska, as well in several remote areas of Canada. The Interior Department is calling for more prospecting and mining of “critical minerals,” including on public lands currently considered off-limits, and even in oceans.

“We have to be more forward-thinking,” said Alexander Gysi, an assistant professor in geology and geological engineering at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden. “It would be better for the U.S. to have a greater range of sources for rare earths.” (VOA)