Monday April 22, 2019

Know the Low Cost Blood Cancer Detection Tool

For the study, the team used a form of clicker training to teach four beagles to distinguish between normal blood serum and samples from patients with malignant lung cancer

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doctors, blood cancer
Dogs have smell receptors 10,000 times more accurate than humans', making them highly sensitive to odours we can not perceive. Pixabay

Your canine friend can use its highly evolved sense of smell to pick out blood samples from people with cancer with almost 97 per cent accuracy, a finding that can lead to new low-cost and non-invasive screening approaches for the disease, finds a study.

Dogs have smell receptors 10,000 times more accurate than humans’, making them highly sensitive to odours we can not perceive.

“Although there is no cure for cancer, early detection offers the best hope,” said lead researcher Heather Junqueira, at BioScentDx, a US-based healthcare company. “A highly sensitive test for detecting cancer could save thousands of lives and change the way the disease is treated,” he said.

cancer
The team plans to use canine scent detection to develop a non-invasive way of screening for cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Pixabay

For the study, the team used a form of clicker training to teach four beagles to distinguish between normal blood serum and samples from patients with malignant lung cancer.

Although one beagle — aptly named Snuggles — was unmotivated to perform, the other three correctly identified lung cancer samples 96.7 per cent times and normal samples 97.5 per cent times.

“This work is very exciting because it paves the way for further research along two paths, both of which could lead to new cancer-detection tools,” said Junqueira.

dogs, blood cancer, cancer detection tool
“This work is very exciting because it paves the way for further research along two paths, both of which could lead to new cancer-detection tools,” said Junqueira. Pixabay

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“One is using canine scent detection as a screening method for cancers, and the other would be to determine the biologic  compounds the dogs detect and then design cancer-screening tests based on those compounds,” he said.

The results will be presented at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology annual meeting in Florida. The team plans to use canine scent detection to develop a non-invasive way of screening for cancer and other life-threatening diseases.  (IANS)

Next Story

Blood Cancer: Stem Cell Protein Play An Important Role in Cure

The stem cell protein Asrij is misexpressed in several human hematological malignancies and implicated in the p53 pathway and DNA damage response, the team said.

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cancer
According to the study, published in the journal Blood, inactivation of the tumour suppressor p53 is essential for unrestrained growth of cancers. But only 11 per cent of hematological malignancies have mutant p53. VOA

Researchers have identified a stem cell protein that may help in finding cure for blood cancer.

The study, done on mice, suggests a stem cell protein called Asrij is a novel regulator of wild type tumour suppressor p53 stability in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).

cancer
According to the study, published in the journal Blood, inactivation of the tumour suppressor p53 is essential for unrestrained growth of cancers. But only 11 per cent of hematological malignancies have mutant p53. Pixabay

It could help design targeted therapies for myeloproliferative disease, a group of slow-growing blood cancers, according to researchers, including Maneesha S. Inamdar from the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR) in Bengaluru.

“We provide a new mouse model resembling myeloproliferative disease and identify a post-translational regulator of wild type p53 essential for maintaining HSC quiescence that could be a potential target for pharmacological intervention,” the team said.

According to the study, published in the journal Blood, inactivation of the tumour suppressor p53 is essential for unrestrained growth of cancers. But only 11 per cent of hematological malignancies have mutant p53.

microscope
The study, done on mice, suggests a stem cell protein called Asrij is a novel regulator of wild type tumour suppressor p53 stability in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Pixabay

Mechanisms that cause wild type p53 dysfunction and promote leukemia are inadequately deciphered, suggests the study.

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The stem cell protein Asrij is misexpressed in several human hematological malignancies and implicated in the p53 pathway and DNA damage response, the team said.

For the study, the team generated the first Asrij null (knockout, KO) in mice and showed they are viable and fertile with no gross abnormalities. However, by six months, they exhibited increased peripheral blood cell counts, splenomegaly and an expansion of bone marrow HSCs with higher myeloid output. (IANS)