Tuesday November 19, 2019

Ten Trees that have Spiritual Significance Attached to them: Find Out!

You will be surprised to know what spiritual representation each of the trees contains

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Trees Landscape
Trees have spiritual representation. Pixabay

June 20, 2017:

Trees have some spiritual representation and symbolic meaning attached to them. A tree is a symbol of endurance, perseverance, antiquity, and magnanimity.  With body rooted in earth and crown dancing in the sky, a tree is a symbol of life.

You will be surprised to know what spiritual representation each of the trees contains. Here is a list of trees with different symbols:

  1.  APPLE 

Apple Tree. Pixabay

It symbolizes happiness, youthfulness, vigor, beauty, and magic.

 

2.  BAMBOO 

Bamboo Tree. Pixabay

It represents spirit, rejuvenation, and versatility.

 

3. BONSAI 

Bonsai Tree. Pixabay

It conveys meditation, harmony, the balance of thoughts.

 

4. CEDAR 

Cedar Tree. Pixabay

The symbolic meaning includes purification and healing.

 

5. CHERRY 

Cherry Tree. Pixabay

It signifies awakening and rebirth. It is also called a symbol of romance.

 

6. EUCALYPTUS

Eucalyptus Tree. Pixabay

It purports wealth and foretelling.

 

7. OAK 

Oak Tree. Pixabay

It is a symbol of prowess and strength and is the most powerful of all trees.

 

8. OLIVE 

Olive Tree. Pixabay

It implies reward, success, and fruitfulness.

 

9. PINE 

Pine Tree. Pixabay

It is a symbol of holiday celebration and eternal life.

 

10. PALM 

Palm Tree. Pixabay

It exhibits firm, unbreakable and an opportunity to nurture the soul.

 


prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter: @Nainamishr94
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Study Reveals That Plants and Trees are Effective Options to Curb Air Pollution

The findings indicate that nature should be a part of the planning process to deal with air pollution

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Trees
Calculations of The Study included the capacity of current vegetation - including Trees, grasslands and shrublands - to mitigate air pollution. Pixabay

Plants and Trees may be better and cheaper options than technology to mitigate air pollution, says a new study from an Indian-origin researcher.

The study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, found that adding plants and trees to the landscapes near factories and other pollution sources could reduce air pollution by an average of 27 per cent.

Researchers found that in 75 per cent of the countries analysed, it was cheaper to use plants to mitigate air pollution than it was to add technological interventions – things like smokestack scrubbers – to the sources of pollution.

“The fact is that traditionally, especially as engineers, we don’t think about nature; we just focus on putting technology into everything,” said Indian-origin researcher and study lead author Bhavik Bakshi from the Ohio State University.

“And so, one key finding is that we need to start looking at nature and learning from it and respecting it. There are win-win opportunities if we do – opportunities that are potentially cheaper and better environmentally,” he added.

To start understanding the effect that trees and other plants could have on air pollution, the researchers collected public data on air pollution and vegetation on a county-by-county basis across the lower 48 states.

Trees
Plants and Trees may be better and cheaper options than technology to mitigate air pollution, says a new study from an Indian-origin researcher. Pixabay

Then, they calculated what adding additional trees and plants might cost.

Their calculations included the capacity of current vegetation – including trees, grasslands and shrublands – to mitigate air pollution.

They also considered the effect that restorative planting – bringing the vegetation cover of a given county to its county-average levels – might have on air pollution levels.

They estimated the impact of plants on the most common air pollutants – sulfur dioxide, particulate matter that contributes to smog, and nitrogen dioxide.

They found that restoring vegetation to county-level average canopy cover reduced air pollution an average of 27 per cent across the counties.

Their research did not calculate the direct effects plants might have on ozone pollution, because, Bakshi said, the data on ozone emissions is lacking.

Trees
The study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, found that adding Plants and Trees to the landscapes near factories and other pollution sources could reduce air pollution by an average of 27 per cent. Pixabay

They found that adding trees or other plants could lower air pollution levels in both urban and rural areas, though the success rates varied depending on, among other factors, how much land was available to grow new plants and the current air quality.

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The findings indicate that nature should be a part of the planning process to deal with air pollution, and show that engineers and builders should find ways to incorporate both technological and ecological systems. (IANS)