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Know What Your Hair Says About Health

Huffingtonpost.com shares a list of health conditions linked to hair problems:

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Know What Your Hair Says About Health
Know What Your Hair Says About Health. Pixabay

Dry or thin or any other hair problem — all are connected to health. The tress issues might be signs of diseases you are unaware of.

Huffingtonpost.com shares a list of health conditions linked to hair problems:

– If you once had thick and lustrous hair that turned fine and limp, check how you’ve been treating your hair. Swimming in chlorinated water and using hair colour are some of the causes of hair shine loss. But limp, dry hair may also be a sign of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid, in which your thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough hormones, causing your metabolism to slow down.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

– Dandruff is a common problem that can be easily treated with an anti-dandruff shampoo. But if your dandruff is starting to turn into thick scaly patches, it could be a sign that you have psoriasis. It is a long-term skin problem that causes skin cells to grow rapidly that leads to thick, white, silvery, or red patches of skin.

– The average person loses about 100 strands a day and it is considered to be normal as the hair volume is unaffected. But if your hair starts to feel markedly thinner, it may be a sign of hypothyroidism or a sign of a hormonal imbalance relating to polycystic ovarian syndrome.

Also Read: Get Those Perfect Curls

– Another sign of a more serious problem could be dry and brittle hair that breaks easily. Your hair is made up of a protein called keratin, and if you’re not getting enough protein in your diet, it could weaken your hair. This could also be another sign of a thyroid issue, so be sure to check with your doctor if this is the case. (Bollywood Country)

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Know How Higher Intake of Sodium Can Treat Lightheadedness

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

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"Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms," Juraschek said. Pixabay

Higher sodium intake should not be used as a treatment for lightheadedness, say researchers challenging current guidelines for sodium consumption.

Lightheadedness while standing, known as postural lightheadedness, results from gravitational drop in blood pressure and is common among adults.

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

However, contrary to this recommendation, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre (BIDMC) found that higher sodium intake, actually increases dizziness.

“Our study has clinical and research implications,” said Stephen Juraschek, researcher from BIDMC in Boston.

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Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions. Pixabay

“Our results serve to caution health practitioners against recommending increased sodium intake as a universal treatment for lightheadedness. Additionally, our results demonstrate the need for additional research to understand the role of sodium, and more broadly of diet, on lightheadedness,” Juraschek said.

For the study, reported in The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, the team used data from the completed DASH-Sodium trial, a randomised crossover study that looked at the effects of three different sodium levels (1500, 2300, and 3300 mg/d) on participants’ blood pressure for four weeks.

While the trial showed that lower sodium led to decrease in blood pressure, it also suggested that concerns about lower level of sodium causing dizziness may not be scientifically correct.

Also Read: ‘It Has Been A Very Long Process, But Ultimately A Very Successful Process’: South Korea Agrees to Pay More for U.S. Troops

The study also questioned recommendations to use sodium to treat lightheadedness, an intervention that could have negative effects on cardiovascular health.

“Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms,” Juraschek said.

“Clinicians should check on symptoms after initiation and even question the utility of this approach. More importantly, research is needed to understand the effects of sodium on physical function, particularly in older adults.” (IANS)