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Know What Your Hair Says About Health

Huffingtonpost.com shares a list of health conditions linked to hair problems:

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Know What Your Hair Says About Health
Know What Your Hair Says About Health. Pixabay

Dry or thin or any other hair problem — all are connected to health. The tress issues might be signs of diseases you are unaware of.

Huffingtonpost.com shares a list of health conditions linked to hair problems:

– If you once had thick and lustrous hair that turned fine and limp, check how you’ve been treating your hair. Swimming in chlorinated water and using hair colour are some of the causes of hair shine loss. But limp, dry hair may also be a sign of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid, in which your thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough hormones, causing your metabolism to slow down.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

– Dandruff is a common problem that can be easily treated with an anti-dandruff shampoo. But if your dandruff is starting to turn into thick scaly patches, it could be a sign that you have psoriasis. It is a long-term skin problem that causes skin cells to grow rapidly that leads to thick, white, silvery, or red patches of skin.

– The average person loses about 100 strands a day and it is considered to be normal as the hair volume is unaffected. But if your hair starts to feel markedly thinner, it may be a sign of hypothyroidism or a sign of a hormonal imbalance relating to polycystic ovarian syndrome.

Also Read: Get Those Perfect Curls

– Another sign of a more serious problem could be dry and brittle hair that breaks easily. Your hair is made up of a protein called keratin, and if you’re not getting enough protein in your diet, it could weaken your hair. This could also be another sign of a thyroid issue, so be sure to check with your doctor if this is the case. (Bollywood Country)

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UN: Geneva Can Improve the Health of Citizens Using Digital Technology

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people's health

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health, citizens, digital technology
FILE - A doctor uses a smartphone to take a photo of a child with facial deformity before surgery at the Vietnam Cuba hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam. VOA

The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued its first guidelines on digital health intervention.

The U.N. agency said governments can improve the health of their citizens by using digital technology to make health systems more efficient and responsive to their patients. The United Nations said 51 percent of the world’s population has access to broadband internet service.

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health.

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Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health. Pixabay

She told VOA the technology enables people, even in the remotest settings, to leapfrog into the development of a more effective, inclusive health system. With the use of mobile phones, computers and laptops, she said it is possible to bypass the intervening stages many countries have had to go through.

“So, a health worker in Congo can directly start using a mobile phone if the government is able to provide one to the health worker and get away from filling 30 paper registers, which occupy about one-third of front-line health workers time,” she added.

New recommendations

The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems.

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The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems. Pixabay

A WHO scientist specializing in digital innovations and research, Garrett Mehl, said the recommendations deal with issues such as birth notification.

ALSO READ: Diabetes During Pregnancy Spikes up the Risk in Kids Later

“Knowing that a baby has been born is critical to knowing how to provide vaccinations; knowing that the mother needs different post-natal care visits,” he said. “But without knowing that there was a birth that has happened, it is difficult to trigger those events in the health system.”

The guidelines also address privacy concerns.They have recommendations for ensuring that sensitive data, such as issues of sexual and reproductive health, are protected and not put at risk. (VOA)