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Knowledge To Restrict Internet Worldwide Exported By China: Report

The report also expressed dismay over efforts in the United States to reverse "net neutrality" rules

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Internet, china
Computer users sit near a monitor display with a message from the Chinese police on the proper use of the internet at an internet cafe in Beijing, China.. VOA
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China is exporting its methods of strict internet controls to governments around the world that are employing them to stifle dissent and free flow of information, and tighten their grip on power, according to U.S.-based Freedom House.

In an annual report issued Wednesday, the rights watchdog said global internet freedom had declined for the eighth consecutive year in 2018, with democratic governance under threat from what it called “digital authoritarianism.”

Internet, china
In this April 29, 2015 file photo, visitors use a laptop computer at a display booth as a security guard stands nearby at the Global Mobile Internet Conference in Beijing. A coalition of international business groups has appealed to China in a letter dated Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016 to change proposed cybersecurity rules they warn will harm trade and isolate the country. VOA

Freedom House says Beijing has held sessions on managing online content with 36 of the 65 countries tracked in the report, and provided internet monitoring equipment to governments of many of those nations. The group also says many governments have passed or proposed new laws restricting web information and access in the name of fighting “fake news.”

Also Read: VPN Security Stepped Up By China Ahead Of Big Trade

The report also expressed dismay over efforts in the United States to reverse “net neutrality” rules that ensure internet service providers treat all data equally, and not manipulate them into “faster” or “slower” speeds. (VOA)

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Google Investigating The Root Cause Of Its Malfunction

ThousandEyes detected intermittent availability issues to Google services from some locations.

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YouTube, Google, google services
A Google logo is displayed at the entrance to the internet based company's offices in Toronto. VOA

After several users complained that they were either unable to access Google services like YouTube on Tuesday, the tech giant confirmed the root cause of this was “external” and under investigation.

Internet research firm ThousandEyes, however, claimed that “traffic to certain Google destinations appears to be routed through an ISP in Russia and black-holed at a China Telecom gateway router”.

The disruption in Google services was limited to nearly an hour.

YouTube, Google, google services
The YouTube Music app is displayed on a mobile phone in Los Angeles. VOA

“Throughout the duration of this issue Google services were operating as expected and we believe the root cause of the issue was external to Google,” the company said.

“We will conduct an internal investigation of this issue and make appropriate improvements to our systems to help prevent or minimize future recurrence.”

According to media reports, G Suite applications like Gmail and Google Drive were not impacted.

Google described the issue as “Google Cloud IP addresses being erroneously advertised by internet service providers other than Google”.

YouTube, Google, google services
A Google logo is seen at the company’s headquarters in Mountain View, California, VOA

ThousandEyes named China Telecom, Nigerian-provider MainOne and Russian network operator TransTelekom behind this incident.

Also Read: Social Media Laws Should Be Tightened: Germany

“Potential hijack underway. ThousandEyes detected intermittent availability issues to Google services from some locations. Traffic to certain Google destinations appears to be routed through an ISP in Russia & black-holed at a China Telecom gateway router,” ThousandEyes tweeted.

Google told the Wall Street Journal that users’ data was not compromised, adding that “and that the company has no reason to believe that the incident was malicious”. (IANS)