Tuesday June 18, 2019
Home Politics Koirala defea...

Koirala defeated, Nepal gets new PM

0
//

Kathmandu: After defeating Nepali Congress leader Sushil Koirala in a keenly contested vote in parliament, Communist leader Khadga Prasad Sharma Oli was on Sunday elected the prime minister of Nepal. He became the first premier of the Himalayan nation after the September 20 promulgation of a federal constitution.

Notably, support from the main opposition Unified Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist helped the CPN (Unified Marxist-Leninist) chairman to bag support of 338 lawmakers out of 587 voting in the 599-seat house.

63-year-old Oli, a chronic patient of kidney-related ailments, is known to be a hawkish politician, whose sharp-worded statements have made headlines in the media.

An earlier sharp critic of the Maoists, Oli joined hands with UCPN-Maoist chairman Pushpa Kamal Dahal ‘Prachanda’ to become the 38th prime minister of Nepal.

The key challenge for Oli now is addressing the demands of agitating Madhesh-based political parties and other groups over concerns related to the newly-promulgated constitution.

He also needs to carry out on war footing reconstruction and rehabilitation necessitated by the April 25 earthquake, restoring peace and tranquillity in the Nepal-India border area and working towards political stability.

Oli started his political career some 45 years back from Jhapa district in eastern Nepal. He represents Jhapa-7 constituency in the parliament.

He served many years in jail during the party-less Panchayat era in Nepal before 1990 when the king was head of state.

He has served as home and foreign minister in the past.

Oli is married but has no children. He has no formal education from a college or a university but speaks several languages.

The 63-year-old leader was elected chief of the CPN-UML in July 2014, defeating Madhav Kumar Nepal, another former prime minister.

He was chief of the UML’s international department before being elected to the top post in the party.

Oli had served as the deputy prime minister and minister for foreign affairs in the Girija Prasad Koirala-led interim government formed immediately after the 2006 People’s Movement.

In 1994, he was minister for home affairs in the cabinet led by then UML chairman Man Mohan Adhikari. He was elected a member of parliament thrice in 1991, 1994 and 1999 from various constituencies in Jhapa district.

(Anil Giri, IANS)

Next Story

Nepalese Government Concludes its Clean-up Drive on the Mount Everest with 11 Tonnes of Trash

Each expedition team has to deposit $4,000, which are refunded if each climber returns with the 8 kg of waste

0
Nepal
This photograph taken from a helicopter shows an aerial view of Mount Everest in Nepal's Solukhumbu district, some 140 kilometers (87 miles) northeast of Kathmandu, on Nov. 22, 2018. VOA

The Nepalese government on Monday concluded its clean-up drive of the Mount Everest and said it had collected nearly 11 tonnes of trash that had piled up on the peak for decades.

The clean-up initiative, the first of its kind since Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa conquered the summit 66 years ago, was launched in mid-April and involved an elite team of 12 high-altitude Sherpa climbers who spent over a month collecting the waste.

“Along with the rubbish, they also collected four dead bodies from the high camps of Mount Everest that were brought to Kathmandu last week,” Dandu Raj Ghimire, the Director-General of Nepal’s Tourism Department, told Efe news.

According to Ghimire, the clean-up campaign cost nearly 23 million rupees (some $207,000). He added that China had also launched a similar drive to clean the north side of the world’s highest mountain.

“There are big environmental concerns and criticism from the international community that Nepal has not shown seriousness to maintain the beauty of the iconic peak,” he added, while vowing that the government would continue to clear the human residues left on Mount Everest.

Ang Dorje Sherpa, the Chairman of the Sagarmatha Pollution Control Committee (SPCC), said around seven tonnes of waste had been collected from the Everest Base Camp and the high camps.

The other four tonnes were removed from the villages of Lukla and Namche Bazar, both of which are considered the gateway to Everest.

Hundreds of foreign mountaineers spend thousands of dollars to conquer the peak every spring season, which normally begins in early April and lasts until May. As they go on the dangerous climb, they leave behind a trail of litter.

FILE – Mount Everest, the highest peak in the world, is seen in this aerial view March 25, 2008. VOA

Various stakeholders, including the Tourism Ministry, the Nepali Army, the Nepal Mountaineering Association, the Nepal Tourism Board, the Sagarmatha National Park, the SPCC and the local government have joined hands for this clean-up campaign.

In recent times, Everest has often earned the moniker of the world’s highest garbage dump.

Several tonnes of old equipment, oxygen cylinders, rubbish and human waste litter the famous mountain.

The government collects more than $3.55 million per year in revenue by issuing permits for climbers, but little had been spent so far to keep the ecosystem clean.

Also Read- Delhi High Court Agrees to Hear Plea Seeking to Increase Prescribed Length of Pregnancy

In 2014, the government introduced a rule forcing each member of an expedition to bring back at least 8 kg of collected garbage, in addition to the trash they generate themselves.

Each expedition team has to deposit $4,000, which are refunded if each climber returns with the 8 kg of waste.

The deposit is refunded only if the SPCC certifies that they have taken all their trash back down. But many commercial expeditions still end up leaving trash scattered among the gelid snow. (IANS)