Monday April 22, 2019

Late Onset of Menstruation May Spike up Dementia Risk, Says Study

For the study, the researchers involved 6,137 women among which 42 per cent later developed dementia

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Representational Image- dementia, Pixabay

Women whose menstruation starts later and those who enter menopause early may have a greater risk of developing dementia, say researchers.

The findings showed that women who had their first menstrual cycle at age 16 or older had a 23 per cent greater risk of dementia than women who had their first menstrual cycle at age 13.

Women who went through natural menopause before age 47 had a 19 per cent greater risk of dementia than women who went through menopause at age 47 or older.

In addition, women who had hysterectomy — surgery to remove all or part of the uterus — had an eight per cent greater risk of dementia than those who did not, according to the study, published in the journal Neurology.

1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia. Pixabay
1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia. Pixabay

“Oestrogen levels can go up and down throughout a woman’s lifetime. Our results show that less exposure to oestrogen over the course of a lifetime is linked to an increased risk of dementia,” said Paola Gilsanz, Researcher at Kaiser Permanente – a US-based healthcare company.

For the study, the researchers involved 6,137 women among which 42 per cent later developed dementia.

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“Since women are 50 per cent more likely to develop dementia over their lifetimes than men, it’s important to study any risk factors that are specific to women that could eventually lead us to potential points of intervention,” Gilsanz suggested. (IANS)

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Violent Relationship ups Mental Disorder Risk in Women, Says New Study

However, a certain amount of unpredictability was actually healthier for women, noted researchers

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For the study, the researchers included 120 women participants, who were assessed concerning the abusive behaviour they faced and the violent environment around them. Pixabay

Women, please take note. If you are in a violent relationship you may be at an increased risk of suffering from mental disorders, suggests a new study.

The study, published in Primary Care Companion for CNS Disorders journal, indicates that the unpredictable violence not only causes physical injuries to women but also leaves the victims at a higher risk of suffering from mental disorders.

“We expect severity and frequency to be the major driver to patient outcomes, but in some cases it isn’t,” said David Katerndahl, Professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center, US.

Women
Representational image. Pixabay

“The nonlinearity, or unpredictability, of the violence is much more of a driver,” he added.

However, a certain amount of unpredictability was actually healthier for women, noted researchers.

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“Women who have what we call ‘optimal nonlinearity’, which means they have some nonlinearity but it’s not extreme, actually did better in the study in general,” said Katerndahl.

For the study, the researchers included 120 women participants, who were assessed concerning the abusive behaviour they faced and the violent environment around them. (IANS)