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Learn Internet of Things: Create Your Own Smart Home

Let us see what makes the IoT possible:

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How would you feel if after waking you up at 7 AM, your alarm clock also turned on the geyser and notified your coffee maker to prepare coffee for you just the way you want it? You know what makes this dreamy morning possible? Yes, Internet of Things! So, what is Internet of Things?

In simple words, it is a web-enabled system that works through internet connectivity and by collecting data from your devices. It follows a Machine to Machine (M2M) communication principle and is a highly complex and intelligent system. You know what else it is? It is the future! From Nest thermostats to hue lights and Fitbits to self-driving cars, it’s all the magic of IoT that keeps us enchanted in this human world and will continue to do so.

Let us see what makes the IoT possible:

How does IoT work:

  1. Embedded sensors: These are responsible for collecting data from the devices that you use as well as your environment. These sensors pick up information such a temperature, pressure, sound, and make your internet of things applications function accordingly.
  1. IPv6:  IPv6 is the communication protocol that enables the working of IoT as well as the creation of new and unique IP addresses. This protocol is secure and allows multiple devices to be connected at once.
  1. Cloud: This is a system of digital data storage that documents all the data transmitted from your cellphones, laptops, home appliances, etc. All the information from your device id, sensors, and processors gets stored in a cloud.
  1. Data processing: Once the data is stored in the cloud, it goes through processes of manipulation to make meaningful datasets. This is made possible through sophisticated algorithms that you can get familiar with through an IoT training.
  1. Connectivity: The IoT applications have the capability to establish both online as well as offline connection. IoT connectivity works on the Point to Point (P2P) principle through the modes of Wi-fi, Bluetooth, Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID), etc.
IoT plays a vital role in our lives.

Why should you care about IoT?

IoT has the potential to make healthcare and medical facilities better than ever. Just imagine how easy things would be when in cases of emergency, the hospital could extract the patient’s medical records from the cloud and operate accordingly without wasting even a single second. With things like Amazon Echo and Google Home,  IoT is already making its way in both outdoor and indoor spaces. Let’s say you forgot to switch off the AC in your room. A few hours later, while sitting in the classroom or watching a movie in the theatre, you suddenly realize that you didn’t switch it off. But you can’t do anything about it until you reach home and then you start worrying about the electricity bill! Guess what, with IoT, all such problems can be solved! Your AC, connected to the internet, will have a short conversation with your smartphone informing it about your carelessness. Your phone will then tell you about it and you can switch it off with just a tap!

With government programs like Digital India, Smart Cities, and Make in India, the nation is advancing towards deploying IoT solutions. According to a TechSci Research report, IoT market in India, currently in a nascent stage, is projected to grow at a CAGR more than 28% during 2015-2020, which would be about $15Bn. Having realized the potential of this trend, government, startups, and huge companies (including Google) are heading towards the IoT space. It blows your mind, doesn’t it? Lucky for you, the IoT industry is still a growing one and can make use of skilled professionals and enthusiastic individuals who have taken up IoT courses.

Here are some careers that you can explore by learning the IoT technology:

  1. Cloud engineers: Cloud engineers perform cloud computing which involves providing host services over the internet. Apart from this, the cloud engineers are also responsible for the planning, management, and support of the cloud’s network and system. Cloud engineers need to be familiar with languages such as Python, Java, and Ruby.
  1. Data scientists: All the connected devices generate huge volumes of data streams. Data scientists have the responsibility of making meaningful datasets out of the transmitted information from the sensors. They also perform memory management by computing the storage of the cloud and are usually required to be familiar with SQL and Java.

Also Read- Intern With A Startup This Summer

  1. Industrial engineers: Managing and programming the hardware is a crucial part of IoT. Industrial engineers are responsible for making M2M happen in IoT projects. This field generally requires a strong quantitative and mechanical aptitude.
  1. UI/UX engineers: The UI/UX engineers in IoT aren’t only responsible for the software design but also the hardware to enhance and optimize the user’s experience. Additionally, they are also responsible for creating appropriate interfaces. The skills needed in this field include Adobe, CSS, GUI development, etc.

Courtesy: Sarvesh Agrawal is the Founder and CEO of Internshala, an internships and trainings platform (internshala.com)

Next Story

Internet of Things: Children at Greater Risk of Bullying, Exploitation in Digital Era

Children are also getting hands-on -- using small-scale easy-to-programme devices such as the "BBC micro:bit" to experiment and get creative with digital technologies

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internet of things
Children are also getting hands-on -- using small-scale easy-to-programme devices such as the "BBC micro:bit" to experiment and get creative with digital technologies. Pixabay

Forget screen addiction as there is a new threat to keeping children safe in the digital era: Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

According to researchers, children need protection when using programmable Internet computing devices in a digital world where everyday objects contain sensors and stream data to and from the Internet.

The risks can include peer-to-peer abuse or bullying, dangers of abuse by adults, as well as risks related to the use, exploitation, commercialisation, or insecure management of any data the children generate by using the devices, warn Lancaster University scientists.

Children are also getting hands-on — using small-scale easy-to-programme devices such as the “BBC micro:bit” to experiment and get creative with digital technologies.

internet of things
Unless properly considered, Internet-connected devices can present risks to children and others around them. Pixabay

Unless properly considered, Internet-connected devices can present risks to children and others around them.

“Children who are learning to programme IoT devices still have critical gaps in their understanding of privacy and security,” said doctor Bran Knowles from Lancaster University’s school of computing and communications.

In addition, parents may also lack technical understanding of IoT, which makes it difficult for them to help ensure their children are managing their privacy and keeping safe.

“Formal training is available for online safety issues such as social media bullying and sexting, but, as yet, there is no IoT component to this curriculum,” Knowles added.

internet of things
According to researchers, children need protection when using programmable Internet computing devices in a digital world where everyday objects contain sensors and stream data to and from the Internet. Pixabay

It is essential, therefore, that the designers of IoT devices anticipate the full spectrum of contexts in which children may use these devices and adopt strategies that will ensure they have properly considered, and mitigated, the potential safety and privacy risks to children and their families.

ALSO READ: Would You Give Up Digital Life if Given Lifetime Data Protection?

“Our research provides a framework to help designers approach these critical risks with their own devices, while still enabling these devices to have enough functions activated so that they still provide a fun learning experience,” she said.

The team’s methodology includes working with supervised groups of school children to explore a wide range of ways that young people may want to use Internet-connected computing devices. (IANS)