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By Ila Garg

Kargil War Heroes – Part 1


The biggest pain for a soldier comes not from the wounds that he bears on his body or the blood that he sheds, but if his blood isn’t enough to protect his nation.


Captain Vikram Batra was one such valiant soldier who sacrificed his life for the nation at a young age of 24.

Born on 9th September 1974 and brought up in the hills of Himachal Pradesh, he was the brave son of G.L Batra and Jai Kamal Batra. His brother Vishal Batra is now working at ICICI Bank, Delhi.

His contributions during the Kargil war can’t go unnoticed. To recognise his bravery and heroism, he was awarded the Param Vir Chakra, India’s highest and most prestigious award for valor.

Every soldier awaits the day when he will be bestowed with the duty of serving his nation. In Captain Batra’s life, it came in the form of Kargil War on 1st June 1999. His unit was assigned to recapture the most significant peak – Point 5140 which was under the illegal possession of the Pakistani soldiers at that time.

Captain Batra showed unflinching courage and presence of mind when he decided to attack his enemy from the rear side to catch them by surprise. Despite being fired at by heavy machine guns, Captain Batra and his unit managed to destroy two machine gun posts. Even his injuries didn’t stop him from taking his mission further.

But unfortunately, the grit displayed by him at such a crucial time is now slowly losing importance.

He single-handedly killed three enemy soldiers in a dangerous combat but after 16 years, people seem to have forgotten all about his gallantry.

It was the unfortunate morning of July 7, 1999, when Captain Batra was sent on a rescue mission with his troop, during a counter-attack from Pakistan. It was while saving a Subedar that Captain Batra was shot. He had told the Subedar to step aside as he had children and a wife to look after. Captain Batra, thus, was not only brave but had a heart of gold.

Before closing his eyes forever, his last words were, “Jai Mata Di”.


The government did provide some help initially but now the family has been left on their own.

The heroism and selflessness made Captain Batra the embodiment of an ideal soldier and epitome of fearlessness. His courage and supreme sacrifice should be an inspiration for the youngsters to join the armed forces. They say public is forgetful but can we really afford to forget our soldiers who sacrifice their precious lives to ensure our safety?

Can we let their bravery go in vain by sitting in our comfort zones and not coming forward at the time of the need?

If they are strong enough to leave their families behind and consider the nation before everything else, even themselves, we should at least be sensitive enough to learn from their acts of valor.

More in this segment:

Kargil War Heroes – Part 2
Kargil War Heroes – Part 3
Kargil War Heroes – Part 4
Kargil War Heroes – Part 5
Kargil War Heroes – Part 6
Kargil War Heroes – Part 7
Kargil War Heroes – Part 8
Kargil War Heroes – Part 9
Kargil War Heroes – Part 10
Kargil War Heroes – Part 11
Kargil War Heroes – Part 12
Kargil War Heroes – Part 13
Kargil War Heroes – Part 14
Kargil War Heroes – Part 15


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