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Let Apps Motivate You to get Better Physique

Whether you are trying to control alcohol consumption or forcing yourself every morning to jog, apps like iBeer and Zombies Run 2 can motivate you

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Let apps motivate you to get better physique
Let apps motivate you to get better physique. Pixabay

Whether you are trying to control alcohol consumption or forcing yourself every morning to jog, apps like iBeer and Zombies Run 2 can motivate you.

 Here’s some fun apps to help you to focus on fitness, reports dailystar.co.uk:

* iPint on iOS and iBeer on Android: If your friends are gulping down beer at parties, you can also join them with this virtual beer. The apps are available on phones that have mobile operating systems like Android and iOS. The best part is it won’t cost you anything and you’ll be hangover free in the morning.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

* Embarrassing Bodies My Health Checker: Before working on a healthier lifestyle, see what poor shape you’re in with this app. Apple users can check out eyes, heart, lungs and body mass index.

Also Read: Instagram Allows You to Post Stories From Other Apps

* Zombies Run 2: The app can be downloaded by Apple, Android and Windows phone users. But it will cost them 1.99 pounds, 2.19 pounds and 1.49 pounds respectively. But it will help to shed some kg. The phone app makes your morning jog a little more exciting. The story starts with you crash landing in the middle of a pack of zombies. As you listen to your playlists, a voice tells you the zombies are right behind you and it’s up to you to save the civilisation. Your phone’s GPS tracks your speed and if you’re not fast enough you’ll be eaten up by monsters. (IANS)

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Know How Higher Intake of Sodium Can Treat Lightheadedness

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

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"Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms," Juraschek said. Pixabay

Higher sodium intake should not be used as a treatment for lightheadedness, say researchers challenging current guidelines for sodium consumption.

Lightheadedness while standing, known as postural lightheadedness, results from gravitational drop in blood pressure and is common among adults.

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

However, contrary to this recommendation, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre (BIDMC) found that higher sodium intake, actually increases dizziness.

“Our study has clinical and research implications,” said Stephen Juraschek, researcher from BIDMC in Boston.

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Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions. Pixabay

“Our results serve to caution health practitioners against recommending increased sodium intake as a universal treatment for lightheadedness. Additionally, our results demonstrate the need for additional research to understand the role of sodium, and more broadly of diet, on lightheadedness,” Juraschek said.

For the study, reported in The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, the team used data from the completed DASH-Sodium trial, a randomised crossover study that looked at the effects of three different sodium levels (1500, 2300, and 3300 mg/d) on participants’ blood pressure for four weeks.

While the trial showed that lower sodium led to decrease in blood pressure, it also suggested that concerns about lower level of sodium causing dizziness may not be scientifically correct.

Also Read: ‘It Has Been A Very Long Process, But Ultimately A Very Successful Process’: South Korea Agrees to Pay More for U.S. Troops

The study also questioned recommendations to use sodium to treat lightheadedness, an intervention that could have negative effects on cardiovascular health.

“Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms,” Juraschek said.

“Clinicians should check on symptoms after initiation and even question the utility of this approach. More importantly, research is needed to understand the effects of sodium on physical function, particularly in older adults.” (IANS)