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Let Apps Motivate You to get Better Physique

Whether you are trying to control alcohol consumption or forcing yourself every morning to jog, apps like iBeer and Zombies Run 2 can motivate you

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Let apps motivate you to get better physique
Let apps motivate you to get better physique. Pixabay

Whether you are trying to control alcohol consumption or forcing yourself every morning to jog, apps like iBeer and Zombies Run 2 can motivate you.

 Here’s some fun apps to help you to focus on fitness, reports dailystar.co.uk:

* iPint on iOS and iBeer on Android: If your friends are gulping down beer at parties, you can also join them with this virtual beer. The apps are available on phones that have mobile operating systems like Android and iOS. The best part is it won’t cost you anything and you’ll be hangover free in the morning.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

* Embarrassing Bodies My Health Checker: Before working on a healthier lifestyle, see what poor shape you’re in with this app. Apple users can check out eyes, heart, lungs and body mass index.

Also Read: Instagram Allows You to Post Stories From Other Apps

* Zombies Run 2: The app can be downloaded by Apple, Android and Windows phone users. But it will cost them 1.99 pounds, 2.19 pounds and 1.49 pounds respectively. But it will help to shed some kg. The phone app makes your morning jog a little more exciting. The story starts with you crash landing in the middle of a pack of zombies. As you listen to your playlists, a voice tells you the zombies are right behind you and it’s up to you to save the civilisation. Your phone’s GPS tracks your speed and if you’re not fast enough you’ll be eaten up by monsters. (IANS)

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UN: Geneva Can Improve the Health of Citizens Using Digital Technology

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people's health

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health, citizens, digital technology
FILE - A doctor uses a smartphone to take a photo of a child with facial deformity before surgery at the Vietnam Cuba hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam. VOA

The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued its first guidelines on digital health intervention.

The U.N. agency said governments can improve the health of their citizens by using digital technology to make health systems more efficient and responsive to their patients. The United Nations said 51 percent of the world’s population has access to broadband internet service.

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health.

health
Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health. Pixabay

She told VOA the technology enables people, even in the remotest settings, to leapfrog into the development of a more effective, inclusive health system. With the use of mobile phones, computers and laptops, she said it is possible to bypass the intervening stages many countries have had to go through.

“So, a health worker in Congo can directly start using a mobile phone if the government is able to provide one to the health worker and get away from filling 30 paper registers, which occupy about one-third of front-line health workers time,” she added.

New recommendations

The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems.

health
The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems. Pixabay

A WHO scientist specializing in digital innovations and research, Garrett Mehl, said the recommendations deal with issues such as birth notification.

ALSO READ: Diabetes During Pregnancy Spikes up the Risk in Kids Later

“Knowing that a baby has been born is critical to knowing how to provide vaccinations; knowing that the mother needs different post-natal care visits,” he said. “But without knowing that there was a birth that has happened, it is difficult to trigger those events in the health system.”

The guidelines also address privacy concerns.They have recommendations for ensuring that sensitive data, such as issues of sexual and reproductive health, are protected and not put at risk. (VOA)