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Let’s Celebrate Father’s Day With Most famous Founding Fathers

Success has many fathers but failure is an orphan.

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Founding Fathers, left to right, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson revise the Declaration of Independence. (Painting by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris)
Founding Fathers, left to right, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson revise the Declaration of Independence. (Painting by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris), VOA

In the United States on the third Sunday of June we celebrate Father’s Day! So, today we celebrate fathers with some expressions that use the word “father” and “dad.”

Let’s begin with a great father idiom!

Success has many fathers but failure is an orphan.

An orphan is a child whose parents have died. Without parents, orphans can often feel alone in the world. There is no adult to claim them, so to speak.

We can say the same about failures. Often people, do not want to claim them as their own. People may not want to take ownership, for example, of a project at work that is a complete bust — you know, a failure.

On the other hand, it is not uncommon for people to fight over ownership of a big success. They always want to be on the right side of history.

“It was my idea!” “No, it wasn’t. I thought of it ages ago.” “Well, I did most of the work!”

You get the idea.

So, this idiom means that people like belonging to a successful cause but they distance themselves from a failed one.

Father and son
Father and son, Pixabay

Here’s how you can use it.

Let’s say a new business opens in your community. Everyone is excited about it! Some even invest money. It is the talk of the town. Then, it fails. People who once supported it don’t seem to remember supporting it.

When those people say to you, “Oh, I knew it would fail. It was doomed from the very beginning.” You can say to them, “Success has many fathers but failure is an orphan.”

Now, you could say that creating the United States of America was a success. And there is a group of men who are famous for being on the right side of history.

We call them the Founding Fathers.

We capitalize these two words when we are talking about any member of the group who wrote the United States Constitution in 1787. Some of the most famous Founding Fathers are George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and Benjamin Franklin.

However, following the success of the musical Hamilton, perhaps Alexander Hamilton has temporarily won the title of “most famous” Founding Father.

But Founding Fathers aren’t just found in history books and on the Broadway stage. We also use this term in other situations.

A founding father is a person who starts or develops a new movement, idea or some other big concept. Used this way, however, we do not capitalize “founding father.”

The Founding Fathers of the U.S. are highly respected and admired by most people. Our next type of father isn’t.

Not all dads are the greatest. In fact, some leave their families and provide no money to help to raise their children. We have a special name for these dads – deadbeat dads.

Also read: Raazi Director Meghna Shares Her Feelings On Working With Father Gulzar

Just for the record, some moms do this, too. But we’ll have to cover that term next Mother’s Day! (VOA)

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About 60% of Adult Men in US are Fathers; 8% Never Married: Census

About three-quarters of fathers were married. Almost 13% of dads were divorced and 8% had never been married

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Father's Day on 16th June'19. VOA

Fathers in the U.S. tend to be better educated than men without children, and relatively few men have children over age 40. These are some of the conclusions in a report released this week by the U.S. Census Bureau, just in time for Father’s Day.

The data in the report came from 2014, when the bureau for the first time asked both men and women about their fertility histories.  The goal of the report was to shed greater light on men’s fertility, a topic about which less is known than that of women’s fertility, according to the Census Bureau.

“In recent decades, there has been growing public and academic interest in fathers and fatherhood given the importance of dad in children’s lives,” the report said. It found more than 60% of the 121 million adult men in the U.S. were fathers. About three-quarters of fathers were married. Almost 13% of dads were divorced and 8% had never been married.

fathers
It found more than 60% of the 121 million adult men in the U.S. were fathers. VOA

Just under a quarter of U.S. men between ages 40 and 50 were childless, and about 17% had never been married by the time they reached their 40s. Both figures were noticeably higher than for women who had reached middle age. Just under 16% of women between the ages of 40 and 50 were childless, and 14% had never been married, according to the report.

Workforce participation

There were also noticeable differences in workforce participation between fathers and mothers with young children. Nearly 90% of dads whose youngest child was under age 6 were employed, while that figure was only around 60% for mothers, according to the report. There was no difference between the sexes for childless men and women.

fathers
About three-quarters of fathers were married. Almost 13% of dads were divorced and 8% had never been married. Pixabay

ALSO READ: Father’s Day Special: This is How a Father Should Spend Time with Kids

Men with children tended to be more educated than those without kids, although the report noted that might be the result of age, since the chances of becoming fathers and reaching higher education levels increases with age. Fatherhood also varied by race, ethnic background and age. Almost 30% of Hispanics in their 20s were fathers.

That was true for about a quarter of black men, more than a fifth of white men and an eighth of Asian men. By the time men reached their 40s, those disparities had narrowed. More than 83% of Hispanics were fathers, around 80% of black and Asian men were dads and around three-quarters of white men were fathers. (VOA)