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Like Uber, get a VIRTUAL doctor on your smartphone

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Los Angeles, USA: As the number of cellphone users around the world continues to grow, more people are able to get services with mobile apps. One of the latest innovations is on-demand medical care. The University of Southern California Center for Body Computing says it uses virtual reality technology and artificial intelligence to provide care for patients anywhere in the world. Elizabeth Lee of Voice of America explains how it works.

From ordering food to getting a ride, mobile apps allow users to get what they want by just pressing a button.

Soon you may also be able to get a doctor – on demand. Well, a VIRTUAL doctor, actually!

Dr Leslie Saxon, Center for Body Computing says: “We’re trying to do the same thing for medical diagnosis and care.”

Now, This doctor is a virtual human, in this case, an avatar…of Leslie Saxon, a heart doctor.

Dr Saxon further adds:“There are only so many experts in the world and we’re never going to be able to bring the world’s medical experts or have enough to supply the need of the entire world.  So we can clone — if you will — many of the experts to provide care anywhere anytime, without borders so that I can treat patients in Iran or Indonesia or India as easily as I can treat them in Los Angeles.”

Researchers here at the University of Southern California’s Institute for Creative Technologies. have been able to create virtual humans that not only interact with real people but respond with empathy.

Randall Hill, Institute for Creative Technologies says: “We can pick up signals there that tell us whether the patient is depressed or happy or whatever.  And so we’re able to use that and create an experience.”

Saxon says in many ways, VIRTUAL doctors can be better doctors than their HUMAN originals. She adds: “We’re human doctors. We’re not always in the same mood. We’re not always delivering information in the same way. We’re not always as current as we need to be depending on the type of visit that we’re having. So these virtual humans hopefully are smarter. Potentially, they even read the patients better.”

The VIRTUAL doctor will have the knowledge of its human counterpart to diagnose problems and provide tailored information about a certain diagnosis based on patients’ characteristics and where they live. Sensors on a phone or worn by the user can provide more information for the virtual doctor. Creators say an avatar like this does not replace real doctors, it enhances them.

And in some places, it helps equalize medical care.

Dr Saxon elaborates: “We can bring everything that’s built in developed countries sophisticated medical systems and knowledge across the world where they are not built.”

The mobile application for the Virtual Care Clinic will be available later this year. The aim is to have virtual doctors speak in multiple languages.

((Elizabeth Lee For VOA News Los Angeles))

The video brought to you by NewsGram in collaboration with VOICE of America.

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India 2nd in Government Requests for Users’ Data on Facebook

In the second half of 2018, Facebook identified 53 disruptions of Facebook services in nine countries, compared to 48 disruptions in eight nations in the first half of 2018

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FILE - A man poses for a photo in front of a computer showing Facebook ad preferences in San Francisco, California, March 26, 2018. VOA

The Indian government requested Facebook to provide data for 20,805 users (including 861 emergency requests) — second only to the US government — in the July-December 2018 period and the social networking giant provided some data in 53 per cent of the cases.

During the second half of 2018, the volume of content restrictions based on local law increased globally by 135 per cent — from 15,337 to 35,972.

“This increase was primarily driven by 16,600 items we restricted in India based on a Delhi High Court order regarding claims made about PepsiCo products,” said Facebook in its latest Transparency Report for the second half of 2018.

The US government asked for users’ data in 41,336 cases wherein Facebook provided some information in 88 per cent of the cases.

“In the second half of 2018, government requests for user data increased globally by seven per cent from 103,815 to 110,634,” Chris Sonderby, Vice President and Deputy General Counsel at Facebook, said in a statement late Thursday.

“Of the total volume, the US continues to submit the highest number of requests, followed by India, the UK, Germany and France,” he added.

In a separate post, Facebook said it removed more than three billion fake accounts in the October 2018-March 2019 period, saying that about 5 per cent of its monthly active users were fake.

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FILE – The Facebook app icon is shown on an iPhone in New York. VOA

Facebook disabled 1.2 billion accounts in Q4 2018 and 2.19 billion in Q1 2019.

“For fake accounts, the amount of accounts we took action on increased due to automated attacks by bad actors who attempt to create large volumes of accounts at one time,” Guy Rosen, Facebook’s vice president for integrity, said in a blog post.

According to Rosen, for every 10,000 times people who view content on Facebook, 11 to 14 views contained content that violate the platform’s adult nudity and sexual activity policy.

In the second half of 2018, Facebook identified 53 disruptions of Facebook services in nine countries, compared to 48 disruptions in eight nations in the first half of 2018.

Also Read: OPPO, Samsung, Apple Most Preferred Brands by Gen Z

“This half, India accounted for 85 per cent of total new global disruptions,” the company informed.

In this period, on Facebook and Instagram, the company took down 2,595,410 pieces of content based on 511,706 copyright reports; 215,877 pieces of content based on 81,243 trademark reports; and 781,875 pieces of content based on 62,829 counterfeit reports.

“In Q1 2019, we took action on about 900,000 pieces of drug sale content, of which 83.3 per cent we detected pro-actively. In the same period, we took action on about 670,000 pieces of firearm sale content, of which 69.9 per cent we detected pro-actively,” added Rosen. (IANS)