Saturday February 29, 2020

Drinking Lingonberry Juice may Regulate Blood Pressure: Study

Drinking this berry juice may lower blood pressure

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blood pressure
Long-term consumption of lingonberry juice lowers high blood pressure. Pixabay

Long-term consumption of lingonberry juice lowers high blood pressure and improves the functions of blood vessels, reveals an experimental study.

At some point in their lives, many people develop elevated blood pressure, even hypertension and functional disturbances in blood vessels related to low-grade inflammation.

In addition to drug therapies, nutrition has a key role in the management of these disorders.

Studies have shown that polyphenol-rich food reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Lingonberry, bilberry, cranberry and blackcurrant are excellent sources of polyphenols.

“Lingonberry juice is no substitute for medication, but it is a good dietary supplement,” said researcher Anne Kivimaki from University of Helsinki in Finland.

Both lingonberry and cranberry are part of the Vaccinium family of plants, just like bilberries blueberries and huckleberries.

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The juice does not prevent the age-related elevation of blood pressure. Pixabay

In her doctoral thesis, Kivimaki investigated the cardiovascular effects of cold-pressed lingonberry juice, cranberry juice and blackcurrant juice as drinking fluid for 8-10 weeks on genetically hypertensive rats (SHR).

Diluted lingonberry juice significantly lowered high blood pressure while juice that contained more polyphenols improved impaired blood vessel function to the level of healthy vessels, the results showed.

The juice did not prevent the age-related elevation of blood pressure typical to the hypertensive animal strain.

Lingonberry juice prevented the expression of genes associated with low-grade inflammation in the aorta. The effect of other berry juices was less marked, showed the findings.

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Underlying the effect is probably the reduction of low-grade inflammation as well as mechanisms related to the renin-angiotensin system, a central regulator of blood pressure, and the availability of nitric oxide, a local endothelial vasodilating factor, said the study. (IANS)

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People with Damaged Livers Can Continue Medication for Diabetes

Even damaged livers can handle medicines for diabetes, BP

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Diabetes
People with diabetes, hypertension and depression might be able to continue taking life saving medications in small doses even while they heal from drug-induced liver injuries. Pixabay

People with diabetes, hypertension and depression might be able to continue taking life saving medications in small doses even while they heal from drug-induced liver injuries, suggests new research.

The findings, published in the journal Drug Metabolism and Disposition, suggests that doctors need not always make patients with drug-induced liver injury stop taking all their medications until the liver healed.

Drug-induced liver injury — when a person accidentally harms their liver by taking medications prescribed by a doctor (or occasionally over the counter drugs) — affects about almost 1 million people globally. “Doctors give patients drugs to treat diseases. No one wants their liver damaged, but it happens all the time,” said Xiaobo Zhong from the University of Connecticut in the US.

When a person takes a medication by mouth, it goes into their stomach and then to the intestines, where it is absorbed into the blood. This blood, in turn, passes first through the liver before reaching the rest of the body. The liver has enzymes that break down medicines.

But different people naturally have more or less of these enzymes. Sometimes, what could be a safe and effective dose in one person is too much for someone else who has different enzyme levels. This is why some individuals are more vulnerable to liver damage, even when taking drugs just as a doctor prescribed.

Diabetes
If patients have chronic conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, or depression, their conditions can run out of control if they do not take their medicines. Pixabay

There is no standard guidance for doctors when a patient gets drug-induced liver damage. Often times they tell the person to stop taking all medications immediately and wait for their liver to recover. But that can take weeks or months.

“But if patients have chronic conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, or depression, their conditions can run out of control,” if they stop taking the medications, Zhong said. And that can be life threatening.

The researchers tested whether mice whose livers had been damaged by acetaminophen (the active ingredient in Tylenol) had lower levels of drug metabolising enzymes, called cytochrome P450 enzymes.

The researchers investigated whether mice with drug-induced liver damage can safely take medications for diabetes, hypertension and depression. It looks like they can, as long as the doses are much smaller than normal, said the study.

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Because the damaged liver does not break down the medications as efficiently, they are just as effective at these lower doses. The team still has to test whether these results hold in humans. (IANS)