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Here is Why Mountain Lions Run Away from the Sound of Humans!

They are so Afraid that they Run Away When they Hear Us

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Mountain Lions, California
A new study conducted by a student of the University of California says that mountain lions run away to the sound of the humans.. Pixabay
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  • A new study conducted by a student of University of California says that mountain lions run away from the sound of the humans
  • “We exposed pumas in the Santa Cruz mountains to the sound of human voices to see if they would react with fear and flee, and the results were striking: They were definitely afraid of humans”
  • The study might prove to be valuable because of the human interference in places of the habitat of the Pumas which increases the chance of human-puma encounters

Los Angeles, June 23, 2017:

One roar from the “King of the Jungle” and that will be enough to chill your spine. We all fear those canines and claw bearing wild cats but that might not be the only case. A new study conducted by a student of the University of California says that mountain lions run away to the sound of the humans.

Justine Smith, who led the study as a graduate student in University of California (UC), Santa Cruz in the US said,  “We exposed pumas in the Santa Cruz mountains to the sound of human voices to see if they would react with fear and flee, and the results were striking: They were definitely afraid of humans.”

The study might prove to be valuable because of the human interference in places of the habitat of the Pumas which increases the chance of human-puma encounters.

“Fear is the mechanism behind an ecological cascade that goes from humans to pumas to increased puma predation on deer. We are seeing that human disturbance – beyond hunting – may alter the ecological role of large carnivores.” said Wilmers.

He also added, “As we encroach on lion habitat, our presence will likely affect the link between top predators and their prey,” he added.

– by Sumit Balodi of NewsGram. Twitter: @sumit_balodi

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Team Led by Indian-Origin Scientist Converts Plant Matter Into Chemicals

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A team led by an Indian-origin scientist from Sandia National Laboratories in California has demonstrated a new technology based on bio-engineered bacteria that can make it economically feasible to produce chemicals from renewable plant sources.
Lignin, a tough plant matter, is converted into chemicals. Pixabay

A team led by an Indian-origin scientist from Sandia National Laboratories in California has demonstrated a new technology based on bio-engineered bacteria that can make it economically feasible to produce chemicals from renewable plant sources.

The technology converts tough plant matter, called lignin, for wider use of the energy source and making it cost competitive.

“For years, we have been researching cost-effective ways to break down lignin and convert it into valuable platform chemicals,” Sandia bioengineer Seema Singh said.

“We applied our understanding of natural lignin degraders to E. coli because that bacterium grows fast and can survive harsh industrial processes,” she added in the work published in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America”.

Lignin is the component of plant cell walls that gives them their incredible strength. It is brimming with energy but getting to that energy is so costly and complex that the resulting biofuel can’t compete economically with other forms of transportation energy.

A team led by an Indian-origin scientist from Sandia National Laboratories in California has demonstrated a new technology based on bio-engineered bacteria that can make it economically feasible to produce chemicals from renewable plant sources.
Scientists successfully convert plant matter into chemicals. Pixabay

Once broken down, lignin has other gifts to give in the form of valuable platform chemicals that can be converted into nylon, plastics, pharmaceuticals and other valuable products.

Singh and her team have solved three problems with turning lignin into platform chemicals: cost, toxicity and speed.

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Engineering solutions like these, which overcome toxicity and efficiency issues have the potential to make biofuel production economically viable.

“Now we can work on producing greater quantities of platform chemicals, engineering pathways to new end products, and considering microbial hosts other than E. coli,” Singh (IANS)

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