Friday April 26, 2019
Home Indian Diaspora Lisa Singh: I...

Lisa Singh: Indian-origin Labour Senator re-elected to the Australian Senate

In 2015 preselection ballot, John Short overtook Lisa, which relegated her to the fourth position

0
//
Lisa SIngh. Image Source:disaccords.wordpress.com
  • Lisa Singh has been re-elected as a Senator in Australia
  • She won an amazing majority of 6.1% of the votes in her own right
  • She’s passionate about social and economic equality, law enforcement and climate change action

Lisa Singh, born in Tasmania to a Fijian-Indian father, a man who arrived as an international student in Australia back in 1963, is now an elected member of the Australian Parliament on July 27.

Before her stint in the Australian parliament, Lisa Singh was sworn in on November 2008 as a Minister for Corrections and Consumer Protection, Minister for Workplace Relations and Minister Assisting the Premier on Climate Change in the Tasmanian Parliament. During her tenure, she introduced many legal reforms but as luck would have it, she was defeated in the March 2010 state elections, mentioned theindiandiaspora.com report.

Journey of an Indian-origin Labour Senator

Lisa singh. Image Source: youtube.com
Lisa Singh. Image Source: youtube.com

This win marks her re-entry into the Australian senate. In 2010, Lisa was elected to the Australian Senate; she then started her journey to build better political ties between India and Australia. During her tenure, she took part in various Indian festivals with the Indian diaspora who were settled in Australia and also visited India soon thereafter. In 2014, President of India, Pranab Mukherjee, honored Lisa by awarding her the Pravasi Bharatiya Samman Award for helping foster better Indo-Australian ties.

During her tenure, she took part in various Indian festivals with the Indian diaspora that were settled in Australia and also visited India soon thereafter. In 2014, President of India, Pranab Mukherjee, honoured Lisa by awarding her the Pravasi Bharatiya Samman Award for helping foster better Indo-Australian ties.

According to theindiandiaspora.com article, in 2015 preselection ballot, John Short overtook Lisa, which relegated her to the fourth position. John Short, an Australian Manufacturing Workers Union Secretary was a reasonable candidate and enjoyed support. This year Singh was demoted to the sixth position. It seemed as an unwinnable position on the Tasmanian Labor Party ticket.

The great-granddaughter of a laborer from Fiji who arrived from Calcutta, Lisa Singh is re-elected to Australian senate, following footsteps of her grandfather Ram Jati Singh who was a MP in the Fiji Parliament coming up against all odds of gender and race Lisa Singh won an amazing majority of 6.1% of the votes in her own right. At a point, it was unlikely for the Labor Party to win more than three Senate seats in Tasmania (a minimum required for Singh to remain in power). However, with 0.80 quota in her name, five seats for Labor Party is practically guaranteed.

Lisa Singh. Image source: indiandiaspora
Lisa Singh. Image source: theindiandiaspora.com

The story of a mother of two sons coming back up from the bottom or sixth position in this context is awe-inspiring. Lisa Singh recently tweeted honouring the decision.

She’s passionate about social and economic equality, law enforcement and climate change action. She hopes to keep fighting for these issues while she mentors people of varied backgrounds to buck up the courage to run for the parliament.

– prepared by Karishma Vanjani of NewsGram. Twitter: @BladesnBoots

ALSO READ:

Next Story

Bill To ‘Secure’ Ukrainian As Official State Language Gets Affirmation

The Ukrainian language also would be mandatory in all official documents, court records, elections and referendums, international treaties, and labor agreements,.

0
Kyiv
Activists rally outside parliament in Kyiv in support of the language law on April 25. RFERL

Ukraine’s parliament has approved legislation that its authors say will “secure” the use of Ukrainian as the official “state language.”

Ukraine’s outgoing President Petro Poroshenko has said that he will sign the bill into law before he leaves office in early June.

But Ukraine’s president-elect, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, has criticized the bill as a set of “prohibitions and punishments” that will complicate bureaucratic procedures and “increase the number of officials instead of reducing them.”

In an April 25 statement on his Facebook page, Zelenskiy said his view “is that the state should promote the development of the Ukrainian language by creating incentives and positive examples.”

“After my appointment to the post of president, a thorough analysis of this law will be made to ensure that it meets all the constitutional rights and interests of all Ukrainian citizens,” Zelenskiy said, adding that he will respond “in accordance with the constitutional powers of the president of Ukraine and in the interest of citizens.”

bill
The bill says the language rules would not apply to private conversations or religious rituals. Pixabay

Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova told reporters in Moscow that the bill contradicts the Ukrainian Constitution and promotes the “Ukrainization” of the country.

“It is actually a law on forced Ukrainization, basically a total one. Its texts envision significant restrictions, and in some case directly ban the use of Russian and the languages of ethnic minorities in different spheres of social life,” Zakharova said.

The bill says “the only official state language in Ukraine is the Ukrainian language.”

It says “attempts” to introduce other languages as the state language would be considered as “activities with the goal to forcibly change the constitutional order.”

The bill also introduces a legal concept known as the “public humiliation of the Ukrainian language,” which it defines as “illegal activity equated to desecration of Ukraine’s state symbols” under the country’s criminal code.

It allows language quotas for state and private television broadcasts and says at least half of the text in printed media must be in Ukrainian.

The legislation also calls for the introduction of “language inspectors who will be present at all gatherings and sessions of any state bodies.”

They would be empowered to demand documents from political parties and public organizations and to impose punitive fines of up to $450 if they determine the documents are “not in Ukrainian.”

facebook
In an April 25 statement on his Facebook page, Zelenskiy said his view “is that the state should promote the development of the Ukrainian language by creating incentives and positive examples.” VOA

The bill also calls for the establishment of a state-run “center for the Ukrainian language” to issue certificates that confirm the language fluency of Ukrainian citizens.

Public posts that require Ukrainian fluency under the bill include the presidency, the speaker of parliament and all parliamentary deputies, government ministers, the head of the state security service, the prosecutor-general, the chief of the Ukrainian National Bank, and local council members.

The Ukrainian language also would be mandatory in all official documents, court records, elections and referendums, international treaties, and labor agreements,.

The bill says the language rules would not apply to private conversations or religious rituals.

The language issue is controversial among Russian speakers in Ukraine.

Russia-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine claim Kyiv is deliberately curtailing the use of the Russian language. (RFERL)