Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Kochi in Kerela has its namesake in Japan as well. Pixabay

July 12, 2017:

Do you know there are myriads of cities in India which have doppelganger name in the abroad as well? No. Well, here is a list of cities in India which have a doppelganger in all over the world.


KOCHI: Kerela/Japan

Kochi, alias Cochin, in India is popularly known as the Queen of the Arabian Sea. The place was incipiently established as a castle town encompassing the seat of the lords of Province of Tosa, the Kochi Castle.

PATNA: Bihar/Scotland

Patna in India is the oldest inhabited places in the world. Previously, it was known as Patliputra. Patna has also been the home to famous astrologists and scholars including Chanakya, Aryabhata, Kalidasa, and Panini. There is another Patna in Scotland that got its name from the Indian city itself. William Fullarton, the founder of the village was the son of a person who served the East India Company.

LUCKNOW: Uttar Pradesh/United States

Lucknow is the capital of Indian state Uttar Pradesh and the largest cultural hub in the state. Its namesake in the United States is a small unincorporated community in Pennsylvania. It is a 5,500-acre mountain estate mansion and surprisingly Lucknow in the United States is also named after the city of Lucknow in India.

BARODA: Gujarat/United States

Vadodara in Gujarat, aka Baroda, is popular for furniture, textiles, handicraft items and food. While its namesake in the United States is a 1.7 sq km village established by Michael Houser. The name was suggested by CH Pindar, a constructor on the railroad born in Baroda.

INDORE: Madhya Pradesh/United States

Indore in Madhya Pradesh has a marvellous past. While Indore in the United States is an unincorporated community in West Virginia that derived its name from Endor, a place cited in the Hebrew Bible.

BALI: Rajasthan/Indonesia

Bali is a town located in Rajasthan on the left shore of Mithari river. The major draw of this town is forts. While Bali in Indonesia houses several islands including Nusa Lembongan, Nusa Penida, and Nusa Ceningan. It is also a popular tourist destination across the world.

KOLKATA: West Bengal/United States

Kolkata, now called Calcutta is the capital of West Bengal. It is also called as ‘Cultural Capital of India’ and ‘City of furious, creative energy’. While its namesake in Ohio state of the US and was designed in 1810.

SALEM: Tamil Nadu/United States

Salem in Tamil Nadu is girded by hilly regions that were part of Chera dynasty and a trade route with the Roman empire. Its namesake is a city in the US state of Massachusetts which is popular for its Witch trials. Contrastingly,‘Salem’ in Hebrew means ‘Peace’.

– by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94


Popular

Photo by Diane Picchiotino on Unsplash

Mass graves marked by individual crosses

Just as much as man has evolved from the time of the nomads, his practices and rituals have grown more and more sophisticated. With time, things that once were just formalities have acquired ritual significance and are observed in solemnity. Death was once something that marked the end, but now is an important life change event that is memorialized. Some people come alive only after death.

In nomadic times, men buried their dead companions or family along the route they traveled. They would place a stone or any heavy object over it, to prevent the soil from becoming loose around the body, or to keep it safe from scavengers. This practice is no longer followed as the animal kingdom and man's world have become distinct from each other.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Marcus Wallis on Unsplash

A match underway

The sporting industry thrives on the success of the patron teams, or at least, teams that the people love. It is common knowledge how much time and energy people are willing to spend watching matches between their favourite team and its rival. Matches that take place across the world, in different time zones, do not matter much when it comes to expressing patronage for a star player or team. Late nights, crowded sitting rooms, and rain-checked appointments are absolutely welcome during match season.

Cricket has gained the world's love when it comes to making them stop everything and stare at a screen, awaiting the next run, boundary, or wicket. No other sport across the world receives as much love and undying allegiance. In this scenario, it is only natural to have an entire system in place that makes use of this immense love for the sport. Creating leagues that run annually, and pit one team against another, to measure prowess, skill, and popularity does not seem odd at all. In fact, it pumps the adrenaline more than ever, and receives an incredible amount of support. People will do anything to watch their team in action one more time.

Keep Reading Show less
Wikimedia Commons

The film closely follows the story of Satyavadi Raja Harishchandra

Cinema and movie making is constantly changing, and the result is in front of us we've come a long way from silent black and white short movies to high definition, colour, 5-D movies. It has evolved for the last 108 years and continues to grow. India's first auteur-filmmaker Dhundiraj Govind Phalke popularly known as Dadasahen Phalke directed and produced India's first feature film Raja Harishchandra which was a hundred per cent made by the Indian crew. The movie was released in Bombay's (Mumbai) Coronation Theatre on the 3rd of May 1913 under the label of being India's first home production, full-length film.

Raja Harishchandra was the first to be 'acted, directed and produced by an all-Indian team. Phalke's inspiration to make a "Swadeshi" movie comes from when he viewed the silent movie, "The Life of Christ" in 1911. He wrote in Navayug, November 1917 that While the Life of Christ was rolling fast before my physical eyes, I was mentally visualizing the gods, Shri Krishna, Shri Ramachandra, their Gokul and Ayodhya… He wanted to feel the connection with the movies but that connection failed to form as the context of the movie was foreign.

Keep reading... Show less